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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 27, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE WEATHER
CLOUDY AND COLDER;
PROBABLY RAIN

' p ,tAhr ' Ci iYi

4:3attx

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XXXI. No. 20. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 1920. PRICE FIVE CENTS

OPERATORS PLEDGE
AID IN COMATING
HIGH COAL PRICES

ACTION FOLLOWS REQUEST
ATTORNEY GENERAL FOR
SUPPORT

OF

RETAILERS GET ONLY
F AIR PROFIT, CLAIM
Meeting Representing Three-Fourths
of Coal Industry Discusses
General Situation
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, Oct. 26. - At an open
meeting here today of approximately
1,000 coal operators representing
7,000 soft coal operators in the coun-
try and three-fourths of the total pro-
duction, a resolution was unanimous-
ly adopted pledging the support to
Attorney General Palmer to elimin-
ate unreasonably high prices and un-
wise practices where such exist.
The action was taken following the
receipt of a message from the attor-
ney general requesting the operators
to co-operate with the department of
Justice in bringing about elimination
-of exorbitant prices for soft coal.
During the discussion of the coal
situation many operators maintained
that bituminous men generally were
only receiving reasonable profits and
that the large majority strongly con-
demned profiteering in coal prices
which if it existed was the exception
rather than the rule.
TO PUBLISH SPEECHES GIVEN
AT EDUCATIONAL CONFERENCE
Prof. John R. Brumm, head of the
department of journalism, is to have
charge of the editing and preparing
for the press a volume to contain all
of the speeches which were given at
the educational conference held here
recently.
Prominent in this collection will be
the address given by Dr. A. Lawrence
Lowell, president of Harvard univer-
sity, in which he sets forth evils
found in the present educational sys-
tem and suggests reforms to correct
these evils; and also an address by
Sir Robert A. Falconer, president of
the University of Toronto, the sub-
ject of which was "The University
and International Relationships."
The book will be sent to libraries
of various universities to serve as
references for those interested in ed-
ucational work.
Men Interested in Swimming to Meet
Those wishing to try out for the
Varsity and freshmen swimming
teams and others interested in swim-
ming are requested to attend a meet-
ing at 7 o'clock tonight in the Union.
Matters important to University
swimming will be discussed.

NAME TWO TEAMS'
,A O LEAD CHEERS'
As a result of tryouts feld at Ferry
field last Saturday, two cheering
teams, each composed of four men
and a captain, were chosen by A. 0.
Cuthbert, '21E, Varsity cheer leader.
The following men selected by
Cuthbert are asked to report for
practice at the field between 4:30 and1
5:30 o'clock this afternoon: S. J. Grif-
finger, '23D, and W. Frankhauser,
'22, captains; R. B. Kelly, '23E, J. A.
Bacon, '23, R. E. Hunt, '22, T. Ross,
'23E, E. Pilcher, '23E, O. A. Nichols,
'23, B. McCracken, '23D, and P. M. l
Shaw, '21.
In regard to the other aspirants
who were not appointed, Cuthbert
says, "Every man who tried out last
Saturday before the game did well,
but as theateams are limited to 10
men, not all the tryouts could be,
chosen, but their names are being
kept on file for future reference, and
may be called upon at any time."I
THREEUDULLR UWHEAT
OBJECT OF GROWERS.,

A9CTS NOW BOOKED
FORL BND BOUNCE
Will Be Means of Sending Band to
Minnesota and 0. S. U.
Football Games
NOV. 5 DECIDED UPON AS
DATE SHOW WILL BE GIVEN
"90. S. UT. and Minnesota too," is the
slogan which the committee in charge
of the Band Bounce, to be held Nov.
5 in Hill auditorium, has adopted. It
is with the idea of raising sufficient
funds to send the band with the foot-
ball team on both these trips next
month that this bounce is being ar-
ranged, and the committeemen state
that they intend to give the campus
its money's worth in the way of en-
tertainment.
Rhodes Will Feature
Featuring a xylophone and a ma
rimbaphone supported by two pianos
and two saxophones, is the part which
D. E. Rhodes, '21, will play in the
evening's entertainment. This com-
bination, playing "popular music in
a featured way" is expected by the
committee to be one of the leaders of
the evening.
The "Midnight Sons" quartette
from the Varsity Glee club will sing
on the program, putting their har-
mony against the "jazz" of the or-
chestras for rewards in musical hon-
ors.
A recent addition to the program is
a dance to be given by George Lynn,
'22, and Anita Sower, '23, who ap-
peared last year in "Red Feather" in
a number similar to that which they
will present at the Bounce.
Pep Is Promised

Students Given Half Holiday For
Armistice Day Parade And Service

Following a meeting of the senate
council yesterday afternoon, Pres.
Marion L. Burton announced to rep-
resentatives of military organizations
on the campus that all classes will be
suspended on the afternoon of Armis-
tice day, Nov. 11. This was done in
order that all ex-service men both in
the University and the town may par-
ticipate in a memorial parade in com-
memoration of the Michigan men who
fell in the war.
Plans for the celebration of Armis-
tice day by the city of Ann Arbor
were made Tuesday night at a meet-
ing of the Chamber of Commerce com-
SANCTIONS GLEE
CLUB, MINSTREL

Committee on Student Affairs
Approval of Show by
Musical Clubs

Gives

ASSOCIATION GIVES HIGHER
BOR COST AS REASON
FOR RAISE

LA.

(By Associated Press)
Wichita, Kan., Oct. 26. - The U. S.
wheat growers association with a
membership of 70,000 in Kansas, Ok-
lahoma, Texas, Nebraska and South
Dakota, has issued a proclamation
urging all of its members to refrain
from selling wheat until such time as
the price of good wheat is increased
to $3 a bushel at growers' terminal
markets.
The proclamation sets forth that
the wheatgrower's expense for labor
was the highest in years, and that
with reduced prices for wheat thel
farmer stood to lose half of his in-
vestment.
Cooley Club Postpones Meeting
The meeting of the Cooley club,
scheduled for this week, has been
postponed to Tuesday, Nov. 2, at
which time a faculty member of the
Law school will talk.

Thomas' orchestra will close

the

bill with what is promised to be a
bit of as snappy music as Ann Ar-
bor has heard in some tifne.
H. P. Lindsay, '21, states that the
committee's intention has been "To
put pep and snap into the entertain-
ment rather than to secure a large
number of mediocre acts."
Call Practice for Senior Engineers
Senior engineers will hold football
practice at 4 o'clock this afternoon on
Ferry field.

Former Faculty Jiember akes
economic Survey For Government

ACTIVE WORK ON PRODUCTION
WILL COMMENCE AT ONCE3
Approval of the proposed Glee and
Mandolin club minstrel show having
been granted yesterday by the com-
mittee on student affairs, work on thet
production will be commenced imme-
diately by the Union committee in
charge of the business management
of the organization.'
To Be First Appearance
A tentative date for the minstrel
has been set as some time in thet
third week of December. This show,
which will be the first public appear-
ance of the club as a unit this year,
is said by officials to be the first step,
in winning for the organization such1
prestige and recognition as, the opera
has obtained in the past years.
As far as is possible, talent for the'
production will be enlisted from
within the club, but tryouts for spe-
cialty acts, such as softshoe dancing
and monologues will be called at some.
date in the near future.
Will Need Book
Men interested in writing a book for
the show should see E. Mortimer
Shuter, who will direct the minstrel,
today, or Ray Storrer, '21E, chair-
man. Their office hours are from
10:30 to 12 o'clock and from 2 to 5
o'clock in the musical activities room
of the Union.
As only a short time remains be-
fore the show, the book will have to
be submitted soon so that the book
committee, which will probably be the
same one that selects the opera book,
can commence work.
Tryouts for the Glee and Mandolin
club progressed last night, and as
soon as all the available material has
been sifted down, the personnel of the
organization will be announced.
V. F. W. TO FORUMLATE PLANS
FOR BIG MEMORIAL PARADE
Definite plans for the memorial par-
ade to be held on Nov. 11 will be made
at a meeting of the Richard N. Hall
post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars
to be held at 7:15 o'clock tonight in
room 318 in the Union. All over-seas
men who have not as yet joined
are urged to be present. Announce-
ments relative to the banquet on Arm-
istice night will be made at this meet-
ing.
Student Council to Meet Tonight
The Student council will meet at
7:15 o'clock tonight in room 306 of
the Union. Plans for the Fall games
and the final sanctioning of arrange-

mittee, who declared that they will co-
operate in every way with the Uni-
versity authorities and service men
to make the memorial parade a suc-
cess.
The committee in charge is plan-
ning for a short service in Hill audi-
torium following the parade. Both the
Varsity band and the Masonic bani
will take part in the parade, which
will be made up of the University and
city posts of the Veterans of Foreign
Wars, the American Legion, the cam-
pus Overseas club, the Marine club,
the G. A. R., and Spanish War veter-
ans.
It has been urgently requested by
the committee in charge that all men
In the University who were in any
branch of service whether at home or
abroad send home for their uniformsa
and march in the parade. Men whod
are unable to procure their uniformss
will form a separate detachment. I
The speaker for the Hill auditorium
services will be selected by the Ann
Arbor Chamber of Commerce com-
mittee, which is endeavoring to se-a
cure some prominent man.>
FERRIS DUFENDS
ADMINISTRATIONI
Woodbridge N. Ferris, Democratic
candidate for governor of Michigan1
at the November election, declared
in the Whitney theater last night hist
belief in "A League of Nations,"I
woman's ability to perform the dutiest
of suffrage, and pointed with pride toI
the record made by the present Dem-
ocratic administration and his own
previous record.
Starting out by speaking of the
part we played in the late war Mr.c
Ferris stated that when Presidentc
Wilson started across the ocean for
the first time he was generally ac-l
knowledged to be the foremost livingt
exponent of world democracy.
Shifting the theme to the League
of Nations, he stated that he knew
the league was bigger than either
Wilson, Harding or Cox. He said the
Democrats had exhausted the supply
of copies of the league which they had
printed and wanted to know why the
Republicans did not place the league's
articles in the hands of the voters if1
It was of such an injurious nature.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
SEMINAR TO BE CONDUCTED
The faculty of the college of engi-
neering has authorized an electrical
engineering seminar to run through-
out the year under the guidance of
Dr. George W. Patterson, head of the
department of engineering mechanics,
and. the first professor of electrical
engineering in the University.
It is intended to develop from this
course a' series of highly theoretical
courses, and to establish a laboratory
for advanced investigation. According
to Prof. John C. Parker, of the elec-
trical engineering department, the
tendency of American engineering
schools has been to concentrate on
practical work, but a course such as
this, following the example of Euro-
pean schools, will make it possible
for students to obtain the best of
mathematical theory, and to originate
new methods of attack.
ALPHA NU TO HOLD VARSITY
DEBATING TEAM TRYOUTS
Selection of men to represent it at
the tryouts for the Varsity debating
team will take the place of the regu-
lar session of Alpha Nu when it meets
at 7:30 o'clock Thursday night in Uni-
versity hall. The question to be de-
bated is, "Resolved, That the United

States should adopt the Parliamentary
form of government."

SPEAKERSPICKED
FOR TRADITIONS
DAYPRO6RAM
MEETING=TO BE IN CHARGE OF
CARL JOHNSON, '20
OLYMPIC STAR
WATKINS, '10, PICKED
TO SPEAK FOR ALUMNI
Prof. Aigler to Represent Faculty,
While James McClintock, '21L,
Is Student Speaker
The prominent speakers listed fo
Traditions day Thursday evening are
alone expected to be enough of a
drawing card to -fill Hill auditorium,
says the council committee headed by
Richard B. Marshall, 121E.
James K. Watkins, '10, of Detroit,
will be the representative of the
alumni who will make his address
principally to the freshmen, for
whom will be reserved the main sec,
tions of the lower floor. Mr. Watkins
is one of the prominent alumni of the
University now residing in Detroit.
His activities on the campus while a
student were, varied. He was a cele-
brated football player, one of the
staunch supporters of Union activi-
ties, and his abilities as a comedian
in the Union operas have often been
termed the best ever seen on the cam-
pus.
Johnson to Preside
Carl E. Johnson,- '20, Michigan's
famous track athlete and member of
America's Olympic team, will be
chairman of the meeting. The two
other speakers will be Prof. Ralph W.
Aigler, of the Law school, and Janes
I. McClintock, '21L, who will talk for
the faculty and the student body. The
Varsity band and cheerleaders will be
on hand to intersperse the speeches
with songs and cheers from the stu-
dents.
For All Students
"The meeting," said Marshall, "is
primarily for freshmen. The Student
council wants the freshmen to start
out their first year with a clear under-
standing of Michigan traditions and
why they should be lived up to. They
will sit in the front rows of the first
floor of the auditorium and the
speeches will be for their especial
benefit. It will be more than a mere
pep meeting, it will be more than a
gathering of freshmen, for we expect
and hope that the rest of the hall will
be occupied by sophomores and upper-
classmen."
Y. W. C. A. Forum Meeting Today
There will be a meeting of all girls
interested in the Y. W. C. A. forum
topic, "Women as Citizens," at 5
o'clock this afternoon in Newberry
hall. A discussion of the Republican
and Democratic platforms by prom-
inent men will be the feature.

WHO IS YOUR CHOICE
FOR U. S. PRESIDENT
Here's an opportunity for you
to express your preference for
the presidency of the United
States for the ensuing years.
On the dotted lines below,
place your choice for President
-Harding, Cox, Debs, or any of
the candidates, then your class,
and whether you are a man or
woman. Mention if you are a 1
faculty member.
Mail this slip or take it to the
office of The Michigan Daily in
the Press building by noon
Thursday. Place it in an envel-
ope for the Sunday editor.
The result of the straw ballot
will be published Sunday, in
connection with the political fea-
tures in the Sunday Supple-
ment.
My Choice for President
M ale ........................
Female...................
Faculty ....................
Class .......................

W. L. Shurz, who was a visitor in
Ann Arbor during the past several
days and who was formerly assistant
professor of Latin-American history
in the University, has just finished an
economic survey of the countries of
Bolivia and Argentina for the United
States department of commerce.
Mr. Shurz has written a book on
Argentina that is now published. He
has written one on Bolivia, which will
be out in about three months. He left
yesterday for Washington, where he
will confer with the department of
commerce heads before leaving for
Brazil. He will be in the latter coun-
try about a year, acting as commercial
attache for the United States govern-
ment.
According to Prof. C. H. Van Tyne,
of the history department, he is rec-
ognized as one of the best informed
men in the country on South Am-
erican history and conditions.
During a recent revolution in Bo-
livia, when the government in power'
was overturned, he escorted the de-
posed president safely from the coun-
try.
It is expected that Mr. Shurz will
assume his duties with the University

SHOULD RESERVE SEATS
FOR CHICAGO GAME NOW
Students are requested to
send in their applications with
the coupons for the Chicago
game immediately. According
to the Athletic association, the
demand for tickets for this game
will be as great as it was for
the Illinois game, and it will be
advisable for students to act
promptly in order to be sure of
receiving reserved seats.

LAST CHANCE TO VOTE
WITH ABSENT BALLOT
All those who have not sent
in application for ballots should
do so at once. Necessary forms
may be obtained at the Repub-
lican club headquarters, Nick-
els' Arcade. All ballots should
be mailed to proper officers not
later than Saturday. Election
will be held in all states, Nov. 2.
Free notary service, Farmers
and Mechanics bank, 9 to 10
o'clock and at Republican club,
4 to 5:15 o'clock.

i

I

I

when he returns from South Amer-4ments for Traditions day will be tak-

I

ica.

en up.

__

Friday
Oct. 29
8 P.M.
ANN ARBOR'S
GREATEST CONCERT

Six

Brilliant

Opera Stars

GIOVANNI MARTINELLI, TENOR MARIE RAPPOLD, SOPRANO
NINA MORGANA, SOPRANO GIUSEPPE CORALLO, TENOR
HELENA MARSH, CONTRALTO THOMAS CHALMERS, BASS
EMILIO ROXAS, AT THE PIANO
IN A PROGRAM OF VERDI - PUCCINI MUSIC AS GIVEN AT THE FAMOUS SUNDAY EVENING
CONCERTS AT THE METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE
COURSE TICKETS (with $3.00 Festival Coupon) $4.50 - $5.00 - $5.50 - $6.00. INDIVIDUAL CON-
CERTS $1.00 - $1.50 - $2.00 FOR SALE AT THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC - MAYNARD STREET

FIVE BIG
CONCERTS
LATER
America's
Greatest Stajrs

I

'I

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