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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 05, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

.

On The.
==Screen

(F. X. K.)
ginning today and lasting for'
e days, the Arcade presents "Les-
in Love" with that popular act-
Constance Talmadge.
s Lelia Calthorpe, she is left by
father's death, the mistress of a
31y mansion and the heiress of a
ine. The fortune dwindles and
guardians feel she should marry,
ry Winkley, one of the guardians,
eives the idea of marrying Lelia
is nephew, Henry Warren, and of
[ng his fortune to young Warren,
providing Lelia with a husbani
money at the same time. He and
stly, the family lawyer, browbeat
a until she consents to look over
kkley's nephew- Warren, however,
ts all plans by refusingto, ,con-
r the idea. From that point the
ario writer put his hero and hero-
through a lot ofspeculiar situations
)re the final close-up.
iss Talmadge does some of the
acting of her career in this pic-
and is ably supported by Flora
ch, as her maiden aunt Agatha,
rge Fawcett, as Priestly, Frank
ister, as Henry Winkley, and Ken-
i Harlan as Henryr Warren.
o start the week, the Majestic has
aged Dorothy Dalton in "The Idol
he North," for a three day run.
s Dalton takes the part of Colette
sac, the daughter of a French-
adian miner, and she finds em-
ment in the main dance hall and
on of the town. Enraged by her
ity at trimming them, the miners

of the town force her to marry Martin
Bates, a derelict. Miss Dalton, how-
ever, with accustomed ease reforms
the man and falls in love with him her-
self. For those who enjoy a good
melodrama, it is heartily recommend-
ed,
* * *
For Wednesday and Thursday, the
Arcade has- booked another comedy,
Wanda Hawley in 'The House That
Jazz Built." Miss Hawley begins the
picture in the role of a poor but beau-
tiful young bride, but her husband be-
gins to make money, and a few years
of indulgence transform her into a fat
and ungainly matron. At this point,
her husband decides that he does not
love her, and leaves her, never to re-
turn. Miss Hawley looks at herself
in the mirror and decides that her hus-
band is right, begins setting-up exer-
cises, and succeeds in winning her
husband back from a deadly vamp.
The plot. and other small faults of the
picture are forgotten however, when
we gaze upon Miss Hawley.
* * *
For Friday and Saturday, the Ar-
cade has booked "Extravagance," the
newest vehicle of May Allison. This
is a departure from Miss Allison's
usual type of picture, it being in 'a
more serious vien than she is wont*to
play. Miss Allison takes the part of
a wealthy young wife whose social
ambitions put a severe dent into her
husband's income. Her husband, des-
perate to keep his wife's love, forges
a check on his father. It is only when
jail faces him that she comes to her
senses. Miss Allison, as Nancy Brown
carries off the honors in the leading
role in her usual style, and is ably
assisted by Robert Edeson, William
Courtwright, and Grace Pike. '

* *Tt i t *
The best offering of the week

on theI

Vhite Flannel Trousers

screen, "Sacred and Profane Love,"z
with Elsie Ferguson, puts in its ap-t
pearance at the Majestic on Wednes-
day to stay for the balance of thef
week. This picture is taken directly
from Arnold Bennett's play of the
same name in which Miss Ferguson
also took the leading part. She suc-
ceeds nearly, if not quite as brilliantlyt
on the screen as on the stage, in her
characterization of Carlotta. She is
supported by a noteworthy cast in-
cluding such stars as Conrad Nagel,
who plays the male lead, Thomas
Holding, Helen Dunbar, and Winifred
Greenwod. The picture is a good ex-
ample of the tendency of the times to
produce some worth-while things. It
is a step in the right direction.
Limelighters In
1921 Class Roll
(Continued from Page One)
capable assistants and has handled
efficiently all the problems with which
he has been confronted.-
Pete Van Boven
Joe Karpus, Larry Butler, and Jack
Perrin, among others, have spent the
major ,portion of their four years on
the athletic field.1
Klrpus Swatted 'Em,
Karpus has lead the attack of the
basketball team and is in a large way
responsible for the tie for Conference
honors in that sport which this year's
team achieved. His worth on the base-
ball diamond has been proved time and
again, his hitting being responsible
for numerous Wolverine wins..
Pete Van Boven has captained the
Varsity baseball team through one of
its most spectacular seasons. Begin-
ning the year under almost unsur-
mountable handicaps the' nine has at
all times played the game and has
proved itself a worthy Michigan ag-
gregation.
They're Known
Perrin in football and baseball and'
Butler in track have been mainstays
of thesenbranches of sport and their
efforts have made the Wolverines fear-
ed wherever they have competed.
Fred Petty and Clarence Johnson
have guided the literary and engineer-
ing senior classes of the University
through the year. Both men have been
instrumental in reviving senior cus-
toms and traditions and in furthering
plans and policies conducive to the
general welfare of the University.
C. Stewart Baxter has been presi-
dent of the Students Christian associa-
tion' through the crucial year of its
existence and the reorganization and
firm foundation on which he leaves
it indicate the quality of work he has
done for Michigan.
The Inksters '
Howard Weeks, Lester Waterbury,
and Willis Blakeslee, have spent their
time editing campus pulications.
Weeks has been at the helm of the
Gargoyle, Waterbury has guided the
Chimes, and Blakeslee edited the, '21
Michiganensian. Long hours of work?
were spent by these men in prepring
themselves for the- positions of editors
and with their appointments the work
became even harder and the responsi-
bilities doubled.
George Roderick has contributed his
share to the activities of the Univer-
sity in writing practically all of the
Opera music for the past two years.
"Pinkey" has also appearel in num-
erous spotlight skits and novelty en-
tertainments.-
Many other men graduating with '21
have worked long, and untiringly for
'21 and the University during their
-college days but to name them all
would be to give a list of all the class

members.
Hey! C 'mon Over
Fine Swimmin'
(Continued from Page One)
and equip the camp. It is up to the
student body to pay the expenses of
the kids up there. $10 will keep a bay
two weeks. "Duke" Dunne, chairman
of the committee, wants to raise $1,500
to put 150 boys in the. camp. Those
who can pay their own transportation
expenses will do so. No salaries wil]
be paid to anyone, the work being
solely on a service basis.
It is expected to enlarge the Michi-
gan camp after this year so that next
year possibly 150 boys can be accom-

modated at one time, instead of 50
that this year's camp will take care
of. One student leader will be in
every tent. Ths campus is doing to be
given an apportunity to give a bit to
the city kids' vacations. How much
is it worth to you to make Michigan's
camp a regular one, with power equal
to her other activities?
rogress JMade
In .Past Year
(Continued from Page One)
stadiui at Ferry Field has already
passed the experimental stage. After
a change had" been made in the plans
as already accepted by the Board in
Control of Athletics engineers were
set to work on, drawings for a huge
bowl that will be able to handle bet-
ter the huge crowds of the Conference
games.
Closer relations among students and
an attempt at common solution of
their problems were made by, means
of the general and upperclass convo-
cations, revived during the year and
highly successful from - the point of
view of 'actual results achieved. A
similar plan leading to consequences
that will be far more apparent in
their effects on the standing of the
University as a whole, is the conven-
tion of newspaper editors of the Con-
ference assembled at Ann Arbor to
discuss mutual - problems and plans
for a closer relationship.

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister

Cor. Catherine and Division Sts.

10:40 A.h M.-"TheNew Nature
Worship." Miss Julia N.
Budlong, minister of the
People's Church, Kalamazoo,
will be the preacher this
Sunday.
5:30 P. M. - Good Fellowship
Meeting of the Y. P. R. U.
Outdoors, weather permit-
ting.
.A Cordial Welcome to All!

Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rter
Rev. Charlaes T. Webb, Curate
1

'~A thlet ic

Year

(Continued from Page One)
Wolverine on the southern training
trip when the nine was just rounding
I =TRINITY LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and William St.
9:30 A. M.-Sunday School.
10:30 A. M.-- Regular Morning
. Service. The Rev. Louis F.
Gunderman, of Monroe, Wis.,
a will be the preacher.
1 ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, tl,,,,,,,, 111111111. . i

FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below State
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER
321 East Ann 'Street
10:30 A. M.
J. M. Wells will speak.
"EATING, DRINKING, AND
BEING MERRY." -
12:00 Noon-Sunday School.

7:35 A. M.-Hqly Communion.
10:30 A. M.-Sermon by the
Rector,: "The Catholic and
Protestant Conceptions."
4:30 P. M. - Evening Service
and Address by the Rector.
ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR
Headquarters In Lane HaL.
Classes meet in the "Upper
Room.
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class, Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.

into shape, and Illinois, only last Sat-
urday, was the first northern school
to beat Michigan in a close 3 to 2
game. If Pete Van Boven's men came
through clean on their present trip,
Michigan will have won her fourth
consecutive ball championship, but at
any rate the Wolverines are certain
to finish second in the Conference per-
centage column. ^
Westy Got Sick
Walter Wesbrook's sudden illness
deprived the tennis team of its cap-

tain and in all probability the Conf
ence title. With Walter in the 1i
up, the court men had refeated
Western schools in dual meets, a
had lost matches only to Yale a
Harvard. As it was, however, Lev
Munz was runner-up in the sing
championship at Chicago last we
The combination of Munz and W
brook should certainly have broug
Michigan the doubles title and Wal
should have garnered in anot
singles' championship.

TODAY'S CHURCH SERVICES

A Very

Good Value

.6:30 P. M.-Guild Meeting.

$1000

"

WADHAMS & CO.

FOUND-AT--LASTI

A Place Where You Can. Get a Real

Satisfying Beefsteak Dinner

!1llillillllll11ltllflllliltllt11111t111Pi
ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
a= REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
' When we get to putting doc-E
trines of God on the shelf be-
cause they are not suitable or
palatable, we are guilty of
Saul's sin of substituting sacri-
Cflee for obedience. Thus we
may please men and insult God.
10730 A. M.-(English) Sermon
by Mr. Herman Meyer, stu-
dent of theology.,
" UIlf11111U1111M11llllllillifllllttllille
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edifice, 409 S. Division.
Sunday services at 10: 30-A. M.
Subject, "God the Only Cause
and Creator."
Testimonial meeting Wednesday
evening at 7:30. A cordial invi-
tation is extended to all.. Sun-
day School at 11:45 A. M., to
which pupils under 20 may be
admitted. A public reading
room, 236 Nickels Arcade, is
open daily, except Sundays and
holidays,- from 12 to 5 o'clock.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
. DISCIPLES
South University Ave.
Classes for Students
F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor
10: 30 A. M.- Subject, "Me-'
morial Day Aftermath."
6:30 P. M.-C. E.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
The Minister speaks at 10:30 on
"DOES IT MAKE ANY DIFFERENCE WHAT
WE BELIEVE?"
12:00 M.
Dr. McCandliss, of Hainan, China, will give a farewell
talk to the student class at noon.

i' x

I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH

REV. ARTHUR W. STALKER, D.D., Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director
SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 1921
10:30 A. M.-OUR GREAT COMMUNION SERVICE..
Music:
"Communion Service" .....................................Moir
"Benedictus qui venit".
- "Credo"
"Agnus Dei"
"Sanctus"
12:00 Noon-Bible School.
6:30 P. M.-WESLEYAN GUILD devotional meeting.
7:30 P. M.-HON. ALBERT, J. BEVERIDGE, Wesleyan Guild Lec-
turer. Subject, "The Bible as Good Readingf'
Music:
"Let Us Who Represent ttie Cherubims"...........Rachmaninoff
"Pilgrim Song"...............................Pschaikowskl

C. E. Social Half-Hour.
ments in the Life of Today."

P. M.
Topic, "The Ten Command-
Rebecca Wilson, Leader.

i

MR. BESIMER SERVES THEM

s

-d

OPPOSITE D. U. R."STATION
JUST ABOVE RAE THEATRE

fI

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

0

-FIRST

Morning Worship, 10:30

COLLEGE

E N D

SALE

Now is your time to buy your
Graduation Gifts
DARLING & MALLIEAUX

'he Minister will preach

9:30 A. M.-Bible School.
7:30 P. M. - Evening Service.
Subject, "The Gospel for
This Age." No. I.

Street

7 Nickels Arcade

I

I

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