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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 05, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Univer-
year by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
lblication of a1 news dispatches credited to it or net otherwise
ited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
s matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $3.5o.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the Sig-
re not necessarily to appear in ptnt, but as an evidence of
. and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
retion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
igned communications will receive no consideration. No mnan-
ipt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
ised in the communications.
"What's Going On" notices will not be received after g o'clock
he evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
NAGING EDITOR ............GEORGE 0. BROPHY JR.
s Editor.......... ............Chesser V Campbell
rman Editorial Board........................Lee Woodruff
ht Editors-
T. H*. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
j). I. Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Lay Editor............ ....... ...-... A.. eritein
Editor........ ... B. P. Campbell
orials*..............T. . Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. '. Beach
ts ......................Robert Aigell
nen's Editor...........................Mary D. Lane
graph ...........---. .++... ..-......Thomas Dewey
scope .... ............................-....E. R. Meiss
Assistants
pline Waldo Frank H. McPike Sidney B. Coates
IG. Weber J. A. Bacon C. T. Pennoyer
beth Vickery W. W. Ottaway Marion B. Stahl
ge Reindel Paul Watzel Lowell S. Kerr
ry B. Grundy Byron Darnton Marion Koch
ces Oberholtzer M. A. Klaver Dorothy Whipple
rt E. Adams Walter Donnelly Gerald P. Overton
ace F. Elliott Beata Hasley Edward Lambrecht
ston MeBain Kathrine Montgomery Sara Waler

enough money for the carrying out of plans for a
model high school which will be erected as soon as
possible. With this equipment, it is hoped the cry-
ing needs for teachers. throughout the state'can be
satisfied and greater steps can be made in the study
of educational science. The goal of the new school
is to attract all prospective teachers from the va-
rious colleges and to unite them in a single college
so that they can get special training and understand
the requirements of education as a distinct profes-
sion.
With the installation of its new college of edu-
cation Michigan stands ready to carry out a plan
that it has longed hoped to make a reality. The fact
that under the new arrangement we will have fa-
cilities for instruction in education equal to those
of any similar school in the country gives addi-
tional evidence that the University is one that keeps
up with the needs of the times.

A BOOK FOR GRADUATION FROM

G

R

A

H

A

M

S

I BOTH ENDS O F THE DIAGONAL WALK

__._-

PYV

H. E,. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
ESS MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
sing .............. ...... ..-..D-P--Joyce
ds .................,.... ........S. Kunstadter
tion ............................F M. Heath
ts. ..............................-..... R. Priehs
tion..................................V. F. Hillery
Assistants
Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robf.rtson M. S. Goldring
. Hutchinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
Cross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
L. Davis A. J. Parker

W
J.
H
A.
)bt.

THE STAGE HERO
Age-long moments of tense silence - the slam-
mimg of a door far backstage - anticipation on
the faces of the' minor actors on the stage and the
program-fluttering spectators - and then, strutting
and magnificent and borne in amid a sudden swish
of ecstatic whispering and a quick spontaneous clap
of applause - the star!
Who has not learned to look forward to this
dramatic and skilfully prepared moment of the mod-
ern drama? We are all worshippers of stage pres-
ence; the great men of our imaginations are all sur-
rounded with a nimbus of the sort of thing which
we would seldom tolerate in our familiars and
which we abstractly despise as "side" and "bluff".
When Otis Skinner swashbuckles out upon the
stage in some such role as the old officer of Na-
poleon in "The Honor of the Family" he catches
the quick-stirred flame of romance that lies so near
the surface in the soul of youth. He and his kind
are masters in the art of magnificent poise and
clamant personality. When the romantic hero im-
plies "I am the sun" we take his word for it; and
whether the plot makes him a delicious rake, an
old-school gentleman, a buccaneer or a charmingly
stone-age crook, we pay him again the tribute of
human nature. The ego has command of us in life's
routine, and we hate to admit inferiority to those
in our own little universe; but the minute we can
get out of the range of galling comparison, our
hero-worship instincts climb on top. The stage hero
satisfies one of life's great human longings.
rIThe Telescope
An Infernal Trick
An introduction always has
Been rather difficult for me,
And if I failed to catch the name,
I'd say, "Is it spelled 'i' or 'e'?"
But once my system didn't work,
It surely failed to fill the bill;
'The girl I met, and sprang it on,
Was peeved, because her name was Hill.
Today's wax mattress is awarded to the individ-
ual who wants to know if a "letter of credit" is a
capital letter.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920I
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6: 05 a. in., 7:05 a. in.,
8:10 a. in., and hourly to 9:10 p.:in.
Limilteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. in. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. in. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit-5:55aan., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. in.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40.p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jaikson-7:b0 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.

1921 JUNE 1921
S. M~. T. W. T. F. S.
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30
PAN AMAS
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas, etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.

t'W.Uashtenaw Electric
Shop
200 East Washingtorn Street

I

'

ii

Increase your business by advertis- ILet a classified ad find
lng in The Michigan Daily.--Adv. tiele.-Adv.

that lost ar-

Electric Fans for
the warm days to come-

1

i i
..

Bring

Your Guests

/I

Telephone 273

To

7- - 7--7

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
4 Iswue of The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
of all news to be printed that night.-
SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 1921.
Night Editor-HUGHSTON McBAIN.
SEND A KID TO CAMP
The Michigan Fresh Air Camp which will be
placed before the students on Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday of this week, presents a two-fold op-
portunity for service. Firstly, financial aid
may be given by all; secondly, half a hundred
men may serve at the camp as counselors, molding
the character of boys still at impressionable ages.
The unqualified success of the permanent camps
maintained by the universities of Pennsylvania
and Princeton is cause for the belief that the Michi
gan camp may be equally successful. Provost-emer-
itus Edgar F. Smith, of Pennsylvania, says: "The
camp is one of the most helpful instruments in the
uplift of the boys. A new life is opened to them."
George W. Perkins, secretary to Postmaster Gen-
eral Hays, says of the Princeton camp: "The
Princeton summer camp ranks at the top of tihe ac-
tivities of the Philadelphian society."
The plan is particularly of the American type of
philanthropy. It is not charity of an indiscrimin-
atory nature encouraging poverty. Each boy must
meet his helpers half way. Most important, per-
haps, is that the boy is taken out of his old en-
vironment and put under the upbuilding influence
of the great-out-of-doors.
Many cases are on record of boys who were made
valuable citizens by these camps. Supeintendent
James Barrett, dean of the evening school of Drexel
institute, was started right when he romped, played,
swam, ate, slept and lived with college men for two
weeks in a fresh air camp away from the degrad-
ing influence of the slums.
Alumni plan to furnish the site and equipment for
the camp. The campus is asked by the student
committee to give $1,500 to pay the expenses of
one hundred and fifty boys at this summer's camp.
Five dollars will send a kid to camp for a week.
Why not get behind the committee and see that the
whole one hundred and fifty get a chance to go?
TIHE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
What is undoubtedly one of the most important
steps that has been made in the educational life of
the State of Michigan is the recent establishment
of a school of education at the University. Coming
after fifteen years of untiring work on the part of
the educational department, it marks the attain-
ment of another goal set by President James B. An-
gell when in 1879 he recognized the responsibility
of the University to provide the state with edu-
cational leaders and brought about the establish-
rnent of a chair of the Science and the Art of
Teaching.
Although Michigan was the first to establish such
a department ard the last to change its policy and
make it into a separate school the new plan satis-
fies a need that the state has long felt.
With the reorganization a great deal can be ac--
complished that was heretofore impossible because
of dependence upon other colleges. The primary
aim .ofthe school is to emphasize teaching as a pro-
fession. It will endeavor to do this by turning out
competent teachers who will have had a training
similar to the laboratory courses of other profes-

Sunday Dinner
MENU
SOUP
Willits' Best
Wafers Olives Radishes
Roast Sirloin Beef
Brown Gravy
Fricasseed Chicken with Biscuit
Creamed Lima Beans
Mashed Potatoes
Salad
Rolls
DESSERT
Huckleberry Pie
Strawberry Shortcake with
Whipped Cream
Strawberry Sundae
Vanilla Ice Cream
Tea Coffee Milk Iced Tea
12:00 to 2:00 P. M.-PrIce $1.00
COME EARLY
Not Open Sunday Evening
WILLITS' CAFE
Phone 173 315 South State

Chinese

Garden

Most Popular Restaurant in the City

I

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YOUR CHOICE OF

AMERICAN AND OINESE COOKING
SPECIAL MENUS FOR SUNDAY AND DURING
COMMENCEMENT

li

AMERICAN MANAGEMENT

106 SOUTH MAIN STE UP STAIRS
"GE T THE HABIT"

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Qouth Eppie Taff:
Here lies a man named Bennie Starte,
Who used cell number ten;
He thought his name was Bonaparte,
But it was only Ben.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"Short Skirts Are Wonderful for Getting
Stares."

kY; .

Portable Phonographs.

FOR YOUR OU TINGS

Up

The senior elections were all taken in fun ttil
the girls tried to decide who was the cam'us flirt.
Page the state troops.
The Game
Even if the gargoyle fellers couldn't play ball,
they certainly did sport some flashy knicker-
bockers.
And, by the way, most of the boys from the funny
journal believed in that old adage, "It is safer to
cover the face than to cover the base".
Stolen Thunder
Miss Newlywed:-Milkman, do you keep your
cows in a pasture?
Milkman-Why, of course, ma'am.
Miss N. W.-Goody! Fred does so love pas-
teurized milk. - The Aggie Squib,
Feeling that by this time she knows us sufficiently
well, L. H. L. has petitioned us to call her "Erma",
and at the same time submitted the following Weir-
ian product of a sudden burst of inspiration:
Yellow, yellow, yellow,
A yellow sun ;
Brown white and white brown,
A yellow sun;
Cold, cold, cold,
Cold and slippery and greasy,
Slippery and oily and slimey,
A yellow sun,
Greasy, slimy, slippery,
A cold fried egg.

AKE music along on your week-end outing or

on your evening canoe trip.
yourself more if you do.

You'll enjoy

E HAVE received a new lot of Portable
Phonographs. These, together with our ex-
cellent line of Victor and Brunswick Records,
will help you solve your vacation music problem.

Thutwr*311t

usir nixse

hrs. A.M. loat'.

I

finlMI 1- 105 u Wllam $'trrdt

Famous Closing Lines
brush you off," said the telegraph pole to

"I'll

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