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June 04, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,.,.

Ea

g except Monday during the Univer.
introl of Student Publications.
EIE ASSOCIATED PRESS
s exclusively entitled to the use for
>atches credited to it or not otherwise
be local news published therein.
e at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ir mail, $3.50.
ess building, Maynard Street.
Editorial, 2.4.
exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
)pear in print, but as an evidence of
will be published in The Daily at the
left at or mailed to The Daily office.
il receive no consideration. No man-
s the writer incloses postage.
cessarily endorse the sentiments x
isr
ces will not be received after 8 o'clock

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
EDITOR ...........GEORGE 0. BROPSY JR.
............... ,........Chesser M. Campbell
:toral Board..........................Lee Woodruff
9-
4Adams - H. W. Hitchcock
Dakin J.E1 . McManis
ud Sherwood. T. W. Sargent, Jr.
r....I.......... .......J..A. Bernstein
B.. P. Campbell
. ......T.JT. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach
..........Robert Angell
tar .................................Mary D. Lane
.........Thomas Dewey
... ...... .. R. Meiss

Assistants
alde Frank H. McPike
ber J. A. Bacon
ckery W. W. Ottaway
rldl Paul Watzel
-undy Byron Darnton
holtzer M. A. Klaver
dams Walter Donnelly
llitt Beata Hasley
Bain Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koche
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Sdward Lambrecht
SaraWailer
H. X. Howlett

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
ESS MANAGER...........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
sing .................................. . P. Joyce
d ..................... .. Kunstadte
Lion .......................... P M. eath
............. ........................ ..E. R. Piehy
on...................... ......... .- Hillry
ASSitat, "
Lambrecht M M. Monte H. C. Hunt
Hlamel, Jt . W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
H.itchinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
Cross R. G. Burchen W. Cooley
L. Davis A. J. Parker
sons wishing to secre infodrmation cnering news for any
The"ailyshould s e the night editor, who has full charge
;wa to be printed that night.
SATURDAY, JUNE 4, 1921.
x -
Night. Editor-MARTIN KLAVER.
IKE IT ONE HUNDRED PERCENT
forty percent showing of the Mentor sys-
iring its initial year is disappointng to every-
ho realizes its possibilities, but only goes to
that more effort will have to be put into it
future to make it come up to expectations.
fact that it has gotten a slow start can be
rtly to the practical difficulties in the original
ry scheme ad partly to the failure of some
men who volunteered to instruct the fresh-
> assume the full burden of their obligation..
iw percentage in the result goes little to the
of the idea. The need for assistance such
best be given -by upperclassmen is as great
r and the Mentor system'is still the logical
giving it. x'That sentiment is still strong for
:cessful installation of the plan is shown by
perclasstnen's resolution approving it which
ssed May first."
re is hnodoubt that the rcent changes inkthe
al mechanism of the scheme will make it
easier to carry out in the future. By assign-
shmen according to territory instead of the
et there will obviously, be a marked saving
less effort on the part of the advisers, oand
entors and .proteges can keep more closely
h with one another.
except by inaking the return for a given
t of effort greater, mechanical changes will
ure any greater degree of success next year
as. The real crux of the matter is that the
s will have to buckle down to work and put
n across.
IIGAN'S ADVERTISING COURSES
year's graduating class is facing a harder
tion than any in nearly thirty years in the
of obtaining employment. Jobs literally do
m to exist. Nearly every type of industrial
mmercial estblishment in the country are
with short staffs and showing little inten-
taking on new men at present at least.
in spite of the widespread shutdown, hard-
business men continue to expend huge sums
iertising. The. yearly total for the United
has been put at a billion dollars by the man-
a large Pacific coast concern. No business
ord to stop pushing sales without running
e of falling behind its competitors. If noth-
is in demand, effective 'advertising is.
resent there are just two courses in adver-
n the University, one in the department of
ogy and the other in the department of jour-
.preposterous to presume that these two
eeach duplicating the other to some extent,
the field of possible instruction in adver-
The psychology course consists of attend-
classes in which the professor liberally
vith bolts and half-bolts, the instruction
ig of a comparison of the value of various
ing, freak and otherwise, and writing im-
ads.
journalistic department, the work requires
11 and written, is more exhaustive.; The

the part of both instructor and students and not on
any essential difference in ground covered.
With all of the so-called practical courses on the
campus we wonder how advertising has come to
be neglected to the extent that it has.
A TOASTMASTERS' CLUB
The season of banquets, for college communities
at least, is with us again. With the surplus of
feasts, one following another in close succession,
we are forced to pay due regard to the toastmas-
ter, for him we have with us on every occasion.
He is lugubrious, weightily witty, and oh, so
long winded. He inevitably comments on brevity
being the soul of wit and wastes precious minutes
telling how he has cut his introductory remarks to
the minimum. Where is that old Toastmasters'
club which ostensibly functioned on the campus sev-
eral years ago? If it lived up to its name is was
probably a gift from heaven in training toastmas-
ters in the art of briefly pointed presentation of
speakers.
And why not a Toastmasters' club now? A group
of men who are capable of speaking well and like
it could easily form such a club with the latest
humor magazines always at hand in their club
room. With a recognized group of competent
toastmasters, many a banquet committee would find
their chief difficulty solved. There would be no
more longdrawn-ouf programs, no tedious half-
hour in which to pray that the toastmaster would
forget about it and permit other men to take up the
important work of the evening.
Speaking from experience, it would seem -that
there are few if any capable toastmasters on the
campus who can hold themselves down to their
proper function. If the reinstitution of the Toast-
masters' club will produce some or bring those
that there are out of hiding then by all means let
us have one more campus organization. It would
only be the part of Christian duty for competent
toastmasters to enroll.
OUR OWN LITTLE SPEEDWAY
Car after car whirls around the right-angle
curve, shrieking and veering, driven with wreck-
less abandon. Now and then a venturesome, fool-
hardy pedestrian essays the crossing. But there is
no abatement in the speed of the onrushing ma-
chines as his plight becomes apparent. Rather
each driver seems to "give her the gas" and delight
in the torments of his victim.
A race at Indianapolis with a thousand dollar
purse on the outcome? Hardly. Thelocale is merely
the corner of State and South-U at the Union on
any afternoon.
As yet no one has been killed although a few
cars have been smashed up at this crossing. Before
there are any casualties, wouldn't it be a good idea
for student and townsmen automobiles to use a lit-
tle more care at this dangerous place?
We note that a school in Chicago is going to
give a degree of M.M. for meter man. Probably
the next trade school degree invented will be D.D.
- ditch digger.
The Telescope
In Season at Least
There was a young student from Rome,
Whohwas pleasantly told to go home;,
Quoth he, "Effie dear,
Try me just one more year,
Or my papa will land on my dome".
- Lopez B. Lombard.
She-Are games ever called on account of too
much sunshine?
He-No, dear, but sometimes they're called on ac-
count of too much moonshine.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"They Don't Spoon in the Rockies, 'Cause the

Mountain Peaks".
He went into the florist's,
And began to rave and rant,
Just because he .couldn't buy
A refrigeration plant.
Stolen Thunder
"Jones got into high society with a splash," re-
marked the parlor snake.
"How (lid he do that ?" replied his envious con-
frere.
"He was invited to a wedding breakfast and they
served grapefruit."
- The Lyre.
Having noticed in the paper that Walter E. Pear,
a college student, attends classes during the day
and works every night in an automobile factory,
P. M. C. wants to know howy many lecture courses
he is carrying. Enough, we should surmise, to get
in at lNast a few hours of sleep.
Dear Erm:
I am troubled with somnambulism. What would
you suggest to keep me from walking in my sleep?
Yours, P.W.5
Dear P. W.--You might try taking car-fare to
bed with you.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm through with politics forever," said' the
campaign manager as he was sent up for life.
ERM.

GN

Ri

A

H

BOTH ENDS

OF THE, DIAGONAL

G. .,.

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Lijn teds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a. m. and e.ery two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. i.,
also 11:00 p. mn. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m.. 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:60 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 JiLFE 1921
S. M. T. W. T. F. S.
.. , . 1' 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
121 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30
PAN ALAS
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas, etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.
WHITE POLO
SHIRTS, $250
GEQ. KYER
DON'T FORGET

A Personal Word to Fraternity
Stewards

A BOOK FOR GRADUATION

To those whom we serve, we need say nothing about
the cleanliness of our Products. If at any time you have
any cause for complaint, tell us; if not, tell others.

ANN ARBOR DAIRY COMPANY

f

A

121 East Catherine Street

Phone 423

WINDOW SHADES

M

Student Headquarters
We carry copiplere stocks of "Brighten-Up" finishes in small size
cans for all "touch-up' jobs around the house.
PAINTS VARNISHES 13RUSHES . WALL PAPER
ENAMELS KALCIINE$ - STAINS ' 61S

L. E. W E N Z E L
Painting an dPecorMIiF

ANN ARBOR PHONE 84
207 EAST LIBERTY

''

t1ri S rr1iu m m er V1ttnn ini tinib
SuMmer 1

Vork?

TO OBTAIN SOME OF

Views of the Campus and
Huron River for your
M-Book.
Especially careful service in
film developing tend printing

i

Interested in a good proposi-
tion selling brushes in your
home town or elsewhere?
Son fine territory left!
Accepted applicants will be
trained free before school is
out-no time lost.
Turther Information
Write Eman'1007 E. Huron or call 1268
between 6:30 and 8:30 evenings.

for amateurs.

713 E. UNIVERSITY AV.!

. QUAIfT Y.
RIB

Glass Dishes
Trademark Reg'd ('fo r ?--alASi)

a-

Durable and economical-saves time, fuel and dishes.
in and serve from the same dish.

You bake

/

YOUR FOOD
WILL TASTE BETTER
when PYREXED

T HE full flavor is retained because the baking is quick and
thorough.
PYREX is a practical and appreciated gift for "showers,"
weddings, birthdays, anniversaries, etc.
We are authorized to replace any PYREX dish that breaks
in use in the oven.

I

j ]

Jno.

C.

Fischer

q QUALITY.
& "' 74

UP-TO-THE-MINUTE HARDWARE
Main, Near Washington Washington, Near Main

,f%;P~il,
4QUALITY. S
fr Jx 'b,

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