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June 02, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-06-02

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VEA THER
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No. 172.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JUNE 2, 1921.

PRICE F

GAN HITTINGi

ITERITZ AND ROBY LEAD DRIVE
BY WOLVERINE
BATTERS
SCHULTZ PITCHES FINE
BALL TILL 7TH FRAME

Farmer Rally, Aided by Errors, Nets
3 Runs in Ninth; Liverance
Fans 4
Coach Ray Fisher swung his heavy
ibatting artillery into line yesterday
afternoon with "the result that Michi-
gan Agricultural college was defeat-
ed on Ferry field by an 8 to 5 count.
Ten clean swats combined with 3 Ag-
gie errors went to make up the total
of Wolverine scores,, while the sud-
den blow-up of Schultz in the ninth
inning, aided and abetted by Roby,
brought the two Farmer rumis previ-
ously made up tp the final score.
Schultz pitched beautiftul ball until
the seventh, allowing but. two hits,
while the splendid backing accorded
him by his team-mates, who produced
a piir of double plays, permitted but
3 men an inning to face him. Michi-
gan, on the other hand, found Kuhn
easy picking and had little less diffi-
culty in finding Ross, who succeeded
him in the fourth.;
Two Miclitgian Tallies .
The Wolverines scored first in the
second frame. Karpus raised the cur-
etain with a neat single, Klein sacri-
ficing him to second. Poor handling
4f the ball by Oas, Aggie catcher, al-
lowing him to reach second when
Genebach dropped one off his bat in
front of the home plate and reached
first in safety, while Karpus, conti n
uing, rounded third and crossed the
" plate. Geneba~ch, w ho had advanced
to second during the; attempt to catch
' Karpus, scored on Roby's single.
Roby leaped into the limelight with
a vengeance in the fourth when he
took a liking to one of Kuhn's offer-
ings, and drove it in the general di-
rection of the tennig courts beyond,
center field for a home run after Gene-
bach had fied out. Schultz was hit,
"but went ,out on an. attempted steal,
and Uteritz, attempting to duplicate
Roby's feat, got as far as third. Van
Boven walked, and Kuhn received the
high sign, retiring from the mound
in favor of Ross. Perrin ended the
inning by sending a roller to first.
Ninth Inning M. A. C. RaMy
Three hits -and 1 error divided be-'
tween the fifth and sixth innings ac-
counted for 5 additional runs to bring
Michigan's total to its final result.
M. A. C. scored first in the sev-
enth. With one down, Schultz hit
Willman,, who scored when Fullen
tripled. As single by Brown sent the
latter across the final mark. Schultz
then settled down and fanned John-
son, Brown making the third out when
he was forced at second bn Pacynski's
Infield grounder. S1i the ninth the
Farmers lit on Dick with a ven-
geance. McMillan, Willman, Fullen,
and Brown, the first four men to the
plate,. singled successively, with the
first two counting. At this juncture
Liverance ascended to the slab. John-
son fanned. Pacysinski did likewise,
but was safe on Roby's error of the
third strike and his poor throw to
Shackleford. Carr likewise fanned,
Continued on Page Eight)

Seniors rPrepare
For Class Days,
Senior lits, senior laws and senior
engineers will hold class days this
year, while no decision has been yet
made as to whether or not a class day
will also be held by senior homoeop
students.
The engineer class day will be Tues-
day, June 28, and the engineers will
meet at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning
in the engineering quadrangle. Sev-
eral student speakers are on the pro-
gram. .
Senior laws will meet at 10 o'clock,
June 27, in the Law building, for the
class day gathering.,
The class day for senior lits will
also be Monday, June 27, and arrange-
ments for several speakers are in-
cluded in the program, which begins,
at 10 o'clock in the morning.
It has been decided to announce the,
full program for the class days at a
later time.
111
George Sawyer, John Fairbairn, Stew.
art Boyer, and George Schemm .
Are Assistants
SQUAD LEAVING TONIGHT ,
TO PLAY FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
Hugh E. Wilson, '22, was appointed
baseball manager for the coming year
at a meeting of the Board in Control
of Athletics yesterday afternoon. Fourt
assistants were named by the board
as follows: George Sawyer, ' 23E,
John B. Fairbairn, '23, Stewart R.i
Boyer, '23, and George A. Schemm,
'23.
The Varsity baseball squad leavesI
tonight for the games with Illinois1
and Wisconsin that will decide the
Conference championship. Illinois
will be played Saturday and the game
with Wisconsin is scheduled for Mon-
day.
REA9 TO 1E&0UNON
SEaRVlcICESCOMMITTEE,
NUMBER OF SPEAKERS SECURED
TO TALK ON NEXT YEAR'S1
PROGRAM

NEWBOLD EXPLAINS
MANUSCR'IPT TODAYI

Penn _ Professor's Lecture
Light on Bacon
Cipher

to Throwj

LAST LECTUREOF HISTORY
DEPARTMENT THIS YEAR
An explanation of the contents of
the Roger Bacon cipher manuscriptS
brought to America by Wilfred Voy-
nich, of London, will be given by,
Prof. William Romaine Newbold, of,
the philosophy department of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania, in an . ad-
dress to be delivered at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon in the Natural Science
auditorium. The drawings in the
manuscript, of which there are more
than 30, will'be exhibited on the screen
by means 'of slides.
These drawings give evidence that
Bacon possessed a microscope of high
power and a telescope, and indicate
that he used them to study and draw
celestial and' anatomical objects,
which, as far as is now kntwn, had
never before been seen by the humans
eye and were not again seen for sev-
eral centuries.'
The speaker' will describe the man-
uscript and explain its importance to
the history of the medical and physi-1
cal sciences. He will also give the
reasons which led him to attribute the
manuscript to Bacon..
ProfessorNewbold comes to Ann
Arbor on an extensive lecture trip
which has carried him into the states
of New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois,
Wisconsin, and Nebraska. Judging
from newspaper accounts, he has ex-
cited great interest wherever he has
talked. The lecture will be the last
one given under the auspices of the
history department until the Sum-
mer session.1
SENIOR LITS CHOOSE
2 SECRETARIES T00AYI

(By Joseph A. Bernstein)
Masques' annual production, staged
for the first timeat the Whitney thea-
ter, last night, proved- conclusively
that the theatrical attempts of the
feminine dramatic organization are
worthy of being staged in a real the-
ater and before a real audience.
Oscar's Wilde's three-act play,
"The Importance of Being Earnest",
was the vehicle with which they laid
claim to a hgh place among Michi-
gan dramatics. Oscar Wilde himself,
if he could have seen the acting of
FRESH MAY ENTER
SPEECH CONTESTS
New Men Entering University Will
Not Have to Wait Year Before
Debating
FRESHMEN COMPETITIONS WILL
BE INAUGURATED IN NEW PLAN
Freshmen entering the University
next fall are going to have an op-
portunity to continue in the speaking
work which they started in high
school without the usual lapse of a
year, according to C. M. Youngjohn
'22L, president of the Oratorical as-
sociation. Those who are interested
in public speaking are assuming a
new attitude toward campus contests
for freshmen. Speaking contests in
which freshman, only, will participate
will be inaugurated.
The old system has not given the
new men a means of showing their
abilities, except intthe annual fresh-
man debate between the two men's
literary societies.
To Give Cup
inasmuch as the Adelphi society{
took the silver cup this year for win-
ning four out of seven debates in as1
many years, it became necessary to
establish a new trophy. Consequent-
ly the Oratorical association has giv-
en a cup which shall pass to the win-j
ning :ociety from year to year and
will never become the permanent
property of any of them. Further-
more, the debates will be triangular
instead of dual affairs in the future,
since Athena, the women's society,
will be allowed to compete. The as-
sociation decided that since the wom-
en have placed three of their num-
ben on University teams during the
past five year, the are worthy of
some recognition. These debates will
be held in the spring as usual.
A declamation contest will be held
in the fall. An award which will
make it profitable for the freshmen
to try out will be given to the win-
per of this contest.rThe declamation
will be an excerpt from the speech of
some great orator.
Wants to Keep Interest
During the winter an oratorical
contest will be held, and the same
general rules apply to 1. The asso-
ciation feels that in this way the in-
terest of .the incoming men in public
speking work can b maintained in-
stead of being diverted entirely to
athletics and newspaper work.
At its last meeting the Oratorical
board passed a resolution as going on
record -in favor of the abolition of
decisionless debates.

Hasques' Annual Stage Production
Has A Real Professional Touch

the young ladies, could not have been
more satisfied with an amateur pro-
duction of~ his work than that of last
night..$
Considering the fact that even the
male parts were taken by members of
the gentler sex, the acting was al-
most perfect.- To Christine Murkett,
'22, as Algernon Moncrieff, go the
highest honors of the evening. Her
interpretation of the role could have
hardly been improved upon by a pro-,
fessional male actor.
And, too, pretty Joyce McCurdy, '22,
must be accorded most of the praise
of those who took the feminine roles.
Miss McCurdy took the part of Ce-
cily Cardew, 18 year old ingenue
demonstrating conclusively that she
has talent worthy of the professional
stage. Miss McCurdy's action was al-
most flawless.
Lessie Gaylord, '23, as the Rev. Ross
Chasuble, was possibly the best char-
acter actress (more correctly "actor")
in the production. Jeanne McPher-
son, '21, as Miss Prism, ably assisted
Miss Gaylord.
Isabel Kemp, '22, and Mary Ives,
'23, as John Worthing and Lady Gwen-
dolyn, acted well together, the for-
mer as the real Earnest of the play.
The part of Lady Brackwell, taken by
Mildred Trcik, '22, is worthy also of
special comment.
R.POSTGIVING
ANNIVERSARY 9NQUET

PROF. HOBBS WILL SPEAK
11 VETERANS TONIGHT AT
ARMORY

TO

ANNUAL MOCK ELECTION
BE HELD AFTER
MEETING

WILL

Walter B. Rea, '22, was chosen
chairman of the Union services com-
mittee for next year, and Renaud
Sherwood, '22, was selected to fill a
vacancy at a meeting of the commit-
tee yesterday afternoon in Lane
hall. At the same time a partially
complete program of speakers was
approved, together with a number of
invitations to speakers who have not

yet signified ,their acceptance.

1i

BONUS BLANKS TO BE
GIVEN OUT
R
A limited number of state bon-
us a plication blanks for former
enli ed men of the , army has
been received by Warren Gil-
bert, '22E, past commander of
the Richard N. Hall post of the
Veterans of Foreign Wars. These
blanks will be distributed at the
R. 0. T. C. office, side entrance,
from 10 o'clock this morning un-
til the supply is exhausted. Pre-
ference will be given to those
men who are going to Camp
Davis next week, and to men
who applied for -blanks Tuesday..
Applicants must bring their or-
iginal discharge papers with
them and secure two witnesses to

Burton to Speak First I
A number of speakers, however,
have, already been definitely secured.
President Marion L. Burton will speak'
at the first of the services on Oct.
16. President R. E. Tulloss, of Vit-
tenberg college, will make the address
for the Thanksgiving day services. On
Feb. 12 President H. C. King, of Ober-
lin college, will appear here. Bishop
Charles J. McConnell, of the Metho-
ist Episcopal diocese at Cleveland,
O., will fill the April 2 date.
Invitations for the other services
'will be sent to such men as Charles
Stelzle, prominent sociologist and an
ordained minster of the Pregbyterian
church, Dr. Hugh Black, noted as a
theologian, Roger W. Babson, statisti-
cian, and Jeremiah W. Jenks, '78, na-
tionally known as a political econo-
mist.
May Get Chorus from S. of M.
A resolution was passed authoriz-
ing the secretary of the committee,
T. S. Evans, also secretary of the S.
C. A., to communicate with the School
of Music to see whether a chorus of
100 voices could be obtained to sing
at the services next season.
A committee consisting of Hugh W.
Hitchcock, '22, Thekla Roese, '22, and
Laura Snyder, '22, was chosen to car-

Senior lits will meet this afternoon
at 4 o'clock in room 205 Mason hall
to elect two alumni secretaries and
to discuss several important senior
matters. One woman secretary will
be chosen to represent the women
graduates and a man to represent the,
male portion of- the graduating class.'
Accordiig to Fred J. - Petty, '21,
president, it is imperative that all
seniors be present as final arrange-
ments for obtaining invitations and
Commencement tickets are to be dis-
cussed.
After the regular business meeting,
the annual mock election will be
held.
SENIORS WILL SING
ON STEPS TONIGHT
All members of this year's gradu-
ating class are strongly urged by the
committee to attend in cap and gown
the next to the last senior sing,
which will be held at 7 o'clock this
evening on the steps of the Library.
The Varsity band will be present to
play for the singing. The last sing
will be held one week from tonight.
COUNTY ROAD EMPLOYE KILLED
WHEN INTERURBAN HITS TRUCK
Ellsworth E. Davis, an employe of
the county road commission, was kill-
ed near Ypsilanti about 2:45 o'clock
yesterday afternoon when the truck
he was driving collided with one of
the M. A. C. special cars returning
to Ypsilanti After carrying the Lan-
sing team to -Ann Arbor.
The accident occurred at the first
road beyond the railroad crossing just
outside of Ypsilanti, and is. said to
have resulted from failure of .the,
truck driver to see the approaching'
car. The only occupants of the in-
terurban were the motorman and the
conductor.
The truck was heavily loaded with
gravel. It was completely demolish-

Members of the Richard N. Hall1
post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars
will give a banquet at 6:30 o'clock to-
night a: the Armory in celebration of
the first anniversary of the post and
a-i a farcwell to the members who will
graduate this spring.
Prof. 11illiam H., Hobbs, of the geol-
ogy department, will deliver -an ad-
dress at the banquet. Wvrren - V.
Gilbert, '22E, former commander of
the post and member of the state bon-
us committee, will explain the pro-
visions of the bonus recently passed
by the state legislature, and will give
a history of the organization of the
Richard N. Hall post. F. L. Walters,
'21L, will speak for the seniors.
Following the banquet, several new
members will be initiated, - and the
post will, hold a business meeting.
Plans will be considered for some
form of memorial to be erected on
the campus in honor of the Michigan
men who lost their lives in the serv-
ice. Tickets for the banquet may be
obtained from N. K. Chamberlain,
'22E, W. V. Gilbert, '22E, J. R.
Rowe, '23, or J. P. Lawton, '24.
CERCLE FRANCAIS
HOLDS INITIATION
Twenty-four new members were
taken into Cecle Francais at the in-
itiation banquet held last night in the
Union. William G. Sharp, '22, retir-
ing president of the organization, wel-
comed the new members and Byron
W. Field, '21, replied for the initiates.
Other talks were given by Prbf. Ar-
thur G. Canfield, of the romance lang-
uage department, Prof. Rene Tala-
mon, of the French department, and
John Cloppet, director of the club.
The following officers were elected:
President, Byron P. Djiras, '21E; vice-
president, Margaret E. Beckett, '22;

Bulletin

Tulsa, Okla., June 1. - Race riots{
today resulted in the death of 80 or
more persons, including nine whites,
according todestimates by the police,
and in the destruction of 10 blocks of
homes in the negro quarters. De-
spite the placing of the city under
martial law desultory firing contin-
ued during the afternoon but the city
this evening was 'comparatively quiet.
Four companies of the national guard
under Adjutant General Barrett are
on duty.
ARCHITECTS ELECT ANDRUS TO
STUDENT COUNCIL YESTERDAY
Due to the ineligibility of one of the'
members elected to the Student coun-
cil by the architects, a new election
was held yesterday. Frank B. And-
rus, '21A, won by a large majority.

BUSIESBTR
DURING MAYSAY!
REPORTF BOAR
MONTHLY SURVEY OF FEDER.
BODY REPORTS SLOW
IMPROVEMENT
RETAIL PRICES MUST
LOWER SOON, BELII
Unempioyment Still Increasing; Wa
Readjustment Still
Slow
(By Associated Press)
Washington, June 1. - While
definite turn for the better" has be
taken apparently by some branct
of industry and the busness outlo
for the season continues genra
more favorable, there is but lit
prospect of "an immediate sharp I
provement of conditions", the Fede
Reserve board declared tonight in
review of the financial and econon
situation throughout the country di
ing May.
Recovery in production and dist
bution has been in progress dun
the month, the report said, but slo
ly and greatly retarded. However,
added, the more hopeful attitu
which has shown itself among bu
ness men recently has continued a
is preparing , the way for rapid ,'
velopment in some industries.
Financially,, the month was one
increasing strength and o6'more pr
perous outlook, the board assert
while irregularities and lack of un
iormity still exist to a marked deg
in the retail field.bSeriousbsta
to the final adjustment of wagestw
forecast unless retail prices mo
much faster to their final basis.
Adjustment between gages a
prices especially retail prices is e
hibiting special difilculty, the boa
maintains, while readjustment
wages has been slow. Unemployme
was on the increase in May the bqa
reported, despite the anticipated I
provement in the labor market d
to the opening of spring agricult
activities.
REVBOULS RESIGNS,
TO TAE AKRON PULPI:
Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas, who hs be
pastor of the First Congregatio
church for several years, announc
yesterday that he will tender bs rT
ignation to his congregation at a s
cial meeting following the regul
services next Sunday morning. R
Douglas has accepted a call to the p
pit of the First Congregatio
church at Akron, 0.
Soldiers' bonus
Passed -By Hou
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, June 1. - By unanin
vote the house today passed the Q
diers bonus bill, after several ame
mnents had been adopted. The mI
important thing was proposed by R
resentative Dr. W. Braman, of K
county, and provides that only $1
000,000 of the bonus bonds run

the full 30 years, that another $1
000,000 be retired in 20 years, a
that the remaining $10,000,000 mata
in 10 years. This change, it was a
gued, would save the state in t
neighborhood of $15,000,000 in inte
est. If approved y the senate
would necessitate reprinting of tw
thirds of the bonds, which at the d
rection of the regular session h
been issued and advertised andd ,
now ready to be .placed on the ma
ket.
Circulo Italiano Elpets Its Offic
At a meeting of the Circulo Italia
last night, the officers for the ensui
year were elected as follows: Pr
ident, J. Leta, Jr., '24; vice-preside
S, Fiordelis '23; secretary, V. Ward
mann, '23; treasurer, C. J. Scavar
'23. The following were appointed
the executive committee: S. F. SO

secretary, Ethel Williams, '22;
ure, E. F. Moore, '22.

treas-I

Yesterday 's Games
National League
New York 8, Philadelphia 3.
New York 9, Philadelphia 2.
Brooklyn 5, Boston 4.
Pittsburgh 4, Chicagq 2.
St. Louis 10, Cincinnati 4.
American League
Washington 8, New York 7.
Boston 6, Philadelphia 3.
Phil nrp 9i 13,atrM- 2

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