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May 26, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

e I I I

,~

NEWSPAPER OATHE UNIVERSITY
OF O MICHIGAN
y morning except Monday during the Unive-
Board in Control of Student Publications.
BSE OF.THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ed Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
1 news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
aper and the local news published therein:
e postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
by carrier ermail, $3.50.
Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.

.83. 90,

°414.'

not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
y to appear in pint, but as an evidence of
events will be published in The Daily at the
tor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
tions will receive no consideration. No mar-
ed unless the writer incloses postage.
not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
unicationg.
fn" notices will not be received after E o'clock
dng insertion.

EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 414
UNG EDITOR ...... ..GEORGE 0. BROPHY j1.
liter ...........-..........ChesserM. dCampbell
iditorial Board.......... ..... ee Woodruff
;ditors- H .Hth~
T. H. Adams K. W.aicc
JI. Dakin . DdManiy
Renand SherwoodW.SretJ.
Editor..............................J. A. Bernstein
or A.. + B. P. Campbell
..T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. AT.Beach
,. . . ... ..Robert Angell
Seditor............... ..... ...Mary D. Lane
...... ... ...........Thomas Dewey
............ ........ ....... .... R. Meiss

cept the hypothesis that radium is a sure cure for
cancer even in its simpler forms. But granted the
statement made by Mme. Curie is true it is hard
to be as enthusiastic as some as to the great bene-
fits to be derived from the use of radium in for-
ever stamping out the evils wrought by cancers.
The metal radium, due to the difficulty of, extract-
ing it, is nearly as scarce as the proverbial hen's
teeth, and as far as anybody knows always will be.
Few hospitals are equipped with an adequate sup-
ply of radium, and the price charged for treat-
ments in almost every case is prohibitive. Unless
some plan is devised to administer radium treat-
ments at a price that more nearly fits the pocket-
book of the averagehuman being it is hard to see
how much progress can be made in ridding the
world of cancer, even though the metal has the
power to cure when used.
Should Mme. Curie's hypothesis be proven true
it Nil be a boon to humanity, but there will still
be plenty of room for scientists to share in the
honor by making the remarkable substance more
available for the uses of the medical profession.
WHAT DO COLLEGE STUDENTS KNOW?
,Last month there appeared in the Atlantic
Monthly an article written by Paul V. West, enti-
tled "What Do College Students Know ?" We hope
and believe there are few people who regard the
college student in the same light as Mr. West sees
them. According to him, -the student should avail
himself of the opportunity while at college to ac-
quire a great .volume of facts, and to catalogue and
cross-index them accurately in his mind. How-
ever, in our opinion, the purpose of a college edu-
cation is not to turn out human encyclopedias.
The main object, we think, is to develop a stu-
dent's reasoning power'and not his memory for de-
tails. What matter it that perchance he cannot an-
swer such questions as "Where is the thyroid
gland ?", "What is a chamelon ?"; "Who was Ro-
din ?", or "Where is Tokio ?", if from his college.
training he has acquired the power of rational rea-
soning. In an engineering course, for instance, a
maximum amount of time is spent upon theory and
principles, and a. mimimumn upon practice; thereby
turning out, not so much a skilled manipulator as a
man who knows the whys and wherefores of the
work he is undertaking and is able to reason out
for himself the details. - Arizona Wildcat..

G

R

A

A BOOK FOR GRADUATION FROM

H

A

M

BOTH ENDS

OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

S._ -

Asistants
d. Frank H. McPike
r J. A. Bacon
ery W. W. Ottaway
1 Paul Watzel
dy Byron Darnton
Atzer M. A, Klaver
ms Walter Donnelly
Kett Beata Hasley
ain Kathirine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Rowell S& Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy; Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
Sara Wailer
H. 4. Howlett

'S

DETHOIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2,1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. mn. Ex.
presses at 9:48 a.tm. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m.. 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. Va. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m.. 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:4&0 a. in.. and
12:10 p.m.
1921 MAY 1921
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 1S 19 20 21
22 24 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 '31
PANAMAS
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamnas., etc., into the Late
Shapes, withall new trimmings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. 'Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St.1 Phone 1792.
AUTOMOBILES FOR HIRE

TheTurkish

®r

C~aretc.e

RUSUESS STAFF
Telephone 90a

,1

lSINESS MANAGER ..........LEGRAND A. tAINES, JR.
dyertising........................- - 'KsD t P. Joyce
a e .. ......'............. .- . -.. -. - Ku---tathr
n10aifl......................X.M. Heath
cwtits....................... R. riehe
Iro.ation ...............-------------.......V. F. Hillery
R. W Lamrech M.Assistants
. W. Lambrecht M.M. Moule H. C. Hunt
. 3. Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
H' . H utchinson Thos. I,.Rice H. W. Heidbreder
., A.Gross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
Robt. L. Davis A. J. Parket
ersons wishing to seure information concerning news for any
sue o6 The Daily should see the night editor, who has full charge
all newS to be prited that night. -
THURSDAY, MAY 26, 1921.
Night Editor-FRANK H. McPIKE.
KNOW YOUR CLASSMATES
It, has been said that "One touch. of Oratory
akes the whole class kin"; and consequently, it
as a great shock recently to one of the instructors
. the Public Speaking department to find that
embers of his class did not even know each other's
ties; - because an Oratory course is sometimes
infully informal. A student therein cannot re-
I ess a feeling of common' oppression with his
ighbor as each in turn is crucified upon the plat-
before the glaring eye of his entire class.
For this reason, it is only natural that failure to
come acquainted is more marked in other
durses throughout the University than in Public
peaking Michigan is . confronted by the same
-oblem as any other like imstitution of her size,I
e problem of keeping her student body united and
terested in each other; thereby fostering a spirit,
fellowship which will perpetuate her as a true
niversity, and not merely a clearing house for
e acquiement of knowledge.
Whatever adverse criticism is made of Illinois,
ill it is to her credit that every visitor from U-
ma last fall greeted every other man frm his
kn university. This is the spirit whi&h must be
ore fully developed at Michigan. It is almost
conceivable that men can see each other day in
d day out, sit as neighbors in class for six months
a time, and still be so uninterested as not to
ow each other's name, and soneglectful as to re-
se a mutual "Hello" when they meet outside of
e class room. A little more congeniality among
e student body will go a great way to prevent the
predations which size is attempting to make in
ichigan's spirit.
HEAT
We suppose the' scientist thinks of heat largely
a chemical phenomenon drying moisture on some
ings but wetting humans by causing them to ex-
Le perspiration from the sudoriferous glands of
e skin, whenever the sun can get at them.
But the average college student is not given to
finitions. Heat to him means one of two things,
cording to the sort of person he is: either a pest
be suffered while we are getting things done, or
excuse for doing nothing.
The earth is full of similar pricks to the flesh,
d the way we react to them is the test of our
ergy and our usefulness. Every man and woman
s a fine chance now of making a self-trial. Shall
6 let heat halt us, or shall we get the better o
at and do our daily jobs in spite of it?
.. MME. CURIE AND RADIUM
Bringing the message that radium can cure, even"
e most malignant cancer Mme. Marie Curie, who
co-operation with, her late husband, Prof. Pierre
'ie, is officially recognized to have discovered
dium, arrived in New York last week. A group
New York society women at whose request Mme.
1e condescended to visit this country have raised
0o000 cto purchase a gramn of_ the precious .mate-
Ifor m Me Curie to use continuing her exper-
nts.
4any prominent physicians are reluctant to ac-

We go 6000 miles for the
Turkish tobacco
used in Murad-Why?
Because -Turkish has a taste -Turkish has a
mildness --Turkish has a delight-far beyond all
cigarette tobaccos of all other lands-
Murad gives you real enjoyment, and true
delight such as no Tobacco other than 100% Pure
Turkish Tobacco can give.
Facts-Facts-FACTS-!

I /

Tens of thousands of smokers
-tens of thousands of times-
have PROVEN this-
""Judge for Yourself-!"

"Hat
Friday
still be
campus
green.

frosh !" met its Waterloo for this year last
at Sleepy Hollow but the wind saved can
used for "Keep Off the Grass.!" and the
is one thing we can always hope to keep

By Trip or Hour
Phone

20(

391J. or

903M

I

Party rides a specialty

The Teeope
Strange, Isn't It?
'There was a young lady -from Ghent,
She never could go 'til she went,
Every time she'd begin,
She'd have to start in,
And when she leaned over she bent.
It has always seemed to us that the costumes
of the fairer sex are exceeding sparing; but the
American Society of Mechanical Engineers tells us
that "milady's styles waste millions of dollars each
year". Seems to be another example of feminine
inconsistency.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
He ran an automatic drill,
But so blase was Seth,
That even though he liked his work,
Still he was bored to death.
Our Latest Song Entitled:
"It's True Our Coffee's Muddy, But You See
It's Just Been Ground."
The steam heated overcoat is hereby awarded to
the individual who- thinks a cap and gown is some-
thing to sleep in.
Stolen Thunder
If he is driving for you, you call him chauffeur ;
it he is driving at you, you call him something dif-
ferent. -= Luke McLTuke.
What's-In a Name?
"Whats the idea of calling me Goldie? You
know my hair's black."
"I call you Goldie, my boy, for every tooth in,
your head."
Bits of History
In 1869 the Royal Dialectical -society conducted
an investigation of the spiritualistic activities in
England. As a result a charge of fraud was
brought against the Davenport Brothers, who, it
has since been discovered, worked in co-operation
with Maurice Chare, and employed Sofia Cushin
as their medium.
Get out your text book, ID. A.
Quite Broadening
They ranlk some oxtail soup and felt
Quite bully, that's the line they sling;
But I just had a plate of hash,
And now I feel like everything.
Famons Closing Lines
"All wrapped up in my work," said the musician
as he played his bass horn. ERM,

ii '.

Phone Orderst
Promptly Filled

Mail Orders
Promptly Filled

I

f

I

- q

I

.e,&4p,'

STORE OPENS 8:30

STORE CLOSES 5:30

EST. 1857
A STORE OF INDIVIDUAL SHOPS

FOR MADAME AND MADEMOISELLE
SLEEVELESS SPORTS

11

IAFASHIONS
DISARM THE MVODE,

11

AND CAPTURE IT COMPLETELY

Fashion revolving in a'circle revives the becom-
ing vogue of sleevelessness. At a recent sports
event a sleeveless frock appeared, not only initiat-
ing a novelty but founding a mode. It was repro-

duced in Sleeveless Sweaters, Suits

and Eques-

trienne Attire, until, VOILA-the Youthful Pro-
tege of Sports Apparel becomes the arbiter of
Fashion.

In the Lexicon of Fashion, Sleevelessness is the Synonym for Slenderness-On the Color Card
Summer, Sports Shades are the Synonym for Chic.

i .

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