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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 22, 1921 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, MAY

,, ,
a I

een On The"
tage --- Screen
(By Edwin R. Meiss)
e Witching Hour," a play which
been recognized as one of the
g contemporary dramas, has
switched to the screen and is on
tion at the Majestic today. Elliott
r plays the leading role in. this
play in a most efficient manner.
subject matter, however, is too
ible to be effectively produced
e movies. It deals with the ac-
ishments of one who is able to
y mental telepathy and thus to
fer his thoughts into the minds
ers.
lay and Monday at the Arcade
Dana is being featured in "Pup-
of Fate." Miss Dana takes the
of a young Italian woman whose

husband leaves her to seek his fortune
in America; makes good as a gambler;
forgets his waiting wife; marries
again; and steeps himself in the gay
life of New York. Meanwhi'e the faith-
ful first wife finds enough money to
bring her to America; meets her hus-
band who refuses to recognize her and
sets out to make her living by giving
marionette performanaces. She makes
a grand success, while failure stares
her husband in the face, together with
a bigamy "charge. In court affairs are
straightened out and the husband re-
turns to his first wife. This play, while
it puts Vio.la Dana in a part which is
just a bit heavy for her, still is an ex-
cellent entertainment. .
Our good .,ooking friend, Wallace
Reid, is scheduled at the Aicade from
Tuesday until the end of the week in
his new picture, "The Love Special."
The story is one of excitement
throughout, a regular, good old hero
tale in which Wallie, as the receiver
for a railroad company, blAsts hills
and inspection parties, saves a train

FOUND - All LASTt

A Place Where You Can Get a Real

Satisfying Beefsteak Dinner

{

'4

MR. BESIMER SERVES THEM

from wreck, rescues some trainmen
from death and steals the heart of a
millionaireess; what more could any-
one desire? There is a good deal of
humor in this picture, and all in all
it offers a pleasing evening's diver-
sion in the realm of the superman.
* * *a.
Thomas Meighan stars at the Ma-
jestic for the latter half of the week
in "The City of Silent Men", with Lois
Wilson playing opposite. This is a
well developed melodrama of prison
life, many scenes of which were ac-
tually laid inside of Sing Sing prison.
Meighan has the role of a country me-
chanic who goes to the big city to ob-
tain work, and while there, falls into
the clutches of a band of crooks for
whose crime he is sent to prison. After
serving part .of his term he escapes
and starts life anew out west.
Ground-hog 1Trip
Full Of Thrills
(Continued from Page One)
is for the purpose of returning the
condensed steam in the form of water
back to the plant to be reconverted
into steam by the boilers. The con-
duits for. electricity are incased in the
concrete platform for walking which
covers a space about three feet wide
on the floor of the tunnel. ..'
The passage-way itself is circular in
form, walled with concrete, and quite
spacious despite the room occupied by
the system of piping. The temper-
ature, contrary to warnings from pes-
simistic friends and the disinterested
guide, was as yet surprisingly low,
probably kept that way for the pur-
pose of luring unsuspecting investiga-
tors into the boiling trap ahead.
Hist: The Steam
If the temperature of the tunnel
was low there were other causes that
added appreciably to the discomfort
occasioned by the strange surround-
ings. As we approached a break in
the steam pipe, where the steam was
rushing out through a hissing valve,
thoughts came 'to mind about what
would happen in case the pipe should
disarrange our plans by bursting.. A
query put to the guide as to the pos-
sibilities in case the water pipe should
likewise disintegrate added nothing at
all to my peace of mind when he re-
plied, "Well, you'd have to watch out,
as you'd probably be drowned."
Soon we reached the substation on
the campus, where a brief rest from
the nervous strain of avoiding steam
pipes was afforded and a chance given
to view from a new angle the strangely
altered bu ldings of the campus. We
now had our choice of following the
tunnel in either direction around the
campus, as at this point, the distrib-
utin center, the pipes divide and con-
tinue around on different sides, meet-
ing underneath University hall. It is
thus possible for the heating system
to concentrate the greatest amount of
heat on the most distant point during
the coldest days of winter. A simple
system of controls at the substation
enables anyone standing on the plat-
form within the building to shut off
the supply of heat of any section o
the campus.
They Build Them Better
After examining the mechanism at
the station we were ready to proceed
around the campus through the old
system of tunnels that were construct-
ed at the same tine as the old powe
plant in the engineering shops. Th
difference in the construction of th
old system was at once apparent
Built of brick, "with a much smallei

circumference, and covered with a
maze of pipes, the older tunnels are
mute testimony to the advances tha
have been made in scientific heating
since their construction 25 years ago,
The guide warned me that It' might
be a little warmer in the, section we
were'now to traverse, and advised m
to shed superfluous upper garments
Little did I realize the extent to which
his words would be verified Thi
steaming pipes, seemingly redoubles
in their fervor, hung close on eithe:
side of the passage-way and poure
forth their heat with vindictive inten
sity. Stumbling along, well-nigh par
boiled, I was well heartened by the

After another short rest, the guide
then led the way to the opening where
the old tunnel continued its path, down
in the rear of the Library and in the
direction of Tappan hall. Passing by
the side tunnels for the Library, the
President's home, Martha Cook dormi-
tory, and Alumni Memorial hall, we
finally reached University hall, where
the tunnel rises very nearly to the
surface. Voices of French instructors
were perfectly audible through the
thin flooring of the building, and in-
voluntarily I stopped to gloat at the
inability of my instructor to charge
me with the evidence of my last bolt.
At this point the most eerie expe-
rience of the trip occurred. For a
short distance .some break in the
'lighting system had necessitated feel-
ing our way through the darkness.
Suddenly we came to an entrance that
led toward the rear basement of Uni-
versity hall and then out through the
sloping doors that appear in back of
the building. As we walked out into
the light the horrible vision of a mass
of gigantic arms, legs, feet, and dis-
torted heads presented itself to view,
piled up in an indiscriminate heap like

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.

SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister

I

Sunday, May 22, 192'

the toil and. planning that -'must be
gone through to keep in working order
a huge organization such as this.
Supplying the requirements of a
large University, functioning day in
and day out, through all seasons of
the year, and operating at the highest
efficiency at all times, the heating
tunnel gives some conception of :the
elements that must be continually at
work to keep Michigan on a smooth
and regular basis of daily efficiency.

the variegated assortment around a
guillotine. The horrible situation was
completely ruined, however, when the
guide in calm tone, unworthy of the
grandeur of the subject, informed me
that these were the debilitated rem-
nants of a collection of statues form-
erly standing in the Library, but now
relegated to their magnificent ash-pbile.
Home Again!
At length we reached the substation,
the welcome sanctuary from which we
had strayed so far. It was with new
appreciation that I was nOw able to
gaze on the shining machinery of the
little building, insignificant compared
with the huge engines of the lower
plant, but giving some indication of
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edifice, 409 S. Division

10:40 A. M.-"The Broader Out-
look." The view of many
men active in the Unitarian
Church today. A reportorial
sermon.
4:30 P. M.-Outdoors Meeting
of Young People, gathering
at the Church.
A Cordial Welcome to All.'

I'

10:30 A. M. - Morning Prayer
and Sermon by the Rev.
Henry A. McNulty, of Soo-
chow, China.

4:30 P. M. - Evening Service
and Address by the Curate,
"Manuscript Bibles."

BRICK WALLS CAN NOT HOLD
THE WELD RUNAWAY X-RAYS
Paris.-X-rays pass through brick
walls and have injured persons in
buildings adjoining laboratories, mem-
bers of the Academy of Sciences have
just been told, by Professor Contre-
moulin, a radiograph expert. He ad-
vised that X-ray laboratories be com-
pletely enclosed in lead sheeting a
quarter of 'an inch thick.

144

dI

;.-. . ."_i

.

FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
HuronSt., Below State
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER
321 East Ann Street

ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR
Headquarters i. Lane Hal.

-H

N

Cor. Catherine and Divi ion St.
Rev. Henry Tatlock, D.D., Rter
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate
7:35 A. M.-Holy Communion.

OPPOSITE D. U. R. STATION
JUST ABOVE RAE THEATRE

Sunday services at 10:30 A. M.
The subject will be: "SOUL
A N D B O D Y." Testimonial
meeting Wednesday evening at
7:30. A cordial invitation is ex-
tended to all. Sunday School at
11:45 A. M., to which pupils un-
der 20 years may be admitted.
A public reading room, 236 Nick-
els Arcade, is open daily, except
Sundays and holidays, from 12
to 5 o'clock.

10:30 A. M.
DR. ALLYN K. FOSTER,
of New York
The Scientific Nature of
Religion"
12:00 M.-Dr. Foster will meet
Gjiild Class.
6:30 P. M.-Union Guild meet-
ing at Methodist Church. Dr.
Foster will speak.

Classes meet In the "Upper
Room."
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday, evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.

I

I

-

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

GARRICK

Mats. Tuesday, Thursday,
& Saturday 25c-50o
Nights 500-750-$1.00

II

SHERWOOD EDDY

CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES
South University Ave.

III

SPEAKS AT 10:30
and will stay to answer questions at 12 M.
UNION YOUNG PEOPLE'S MEETING

12th Annual Season

2nd. Week

The Bonstelle Co.

Classes for Students
F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor
9:30 A. M.-Bible School.
Maurice Taylor, Supt.
10:30 A. M.-Subject, "Hitherto
Hath the Lord Led Us."
6:30 P. M.-Christian Endeavor.
Win. Ogden, President.
7:30 P. M.-Views on Michigan
Inland Water. Sermon sub-
ject, "The Water of Life."'

ALLYN K.FOSTER WILL SPEAK

at the M. E. Church.

a

i

I

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REF. ARTHUR W. STALKER, DID., Pastor
WISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Studeat Director
Sunday, May 15, 1921

presents

I

Bab"

I4
TRINITY LUTHERAN
Fifth Ave. and Wiiam St,
9:30 A. M.-Sunday School.
10:30 A. .M.-Regular Morning =

9:30
10:30
12:00.
6:00.
6:30

A. M.
A. M
Noon.
P. M.
P. M.

Bible -Class, Mr. Clair Searles, Leader.
"THE CORONATION OF HUNGER," Pastor's subject.
Three Bible Classes for Students.
Social Half Hour for the.Young People.
MR. ALLYN K. FOSTER, Secretary for University Stu-
dents of kthe Baptist Board of Education, will be the
speaker at a Union Guild meeting.

D SHUB E R TTO
E T BBR N WNIGHTS at 8:15

SPECIAL MUSIC FOR THE DAY: "Unfold Ye Portals" (Gounod), the
Chorus; "Benedictus" (Gounod), the Chorus; "People Victorious"
(from Hora Novissima), (Parker), Solo by Miss Howe.
A CORDIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TO ALL STUDENTS

I'

D. W. GRIFFITH'S

0
a

"S p e c t -ators
find themselves

WAY

grippin
arms of'

the
their

DOWN
EAST

"A photo-
graphic tri-
umph tthat
brought de-
served cheers."
-Detroit Free
Press.

chairs." - De-

troit News.

encouraging words of the guide as he
turned and said, "This isn't very hot-
you'll get used to it; it gets worse
later on." At any rate, my expecta-
tions and the forebodings of gloomy
friends were realized to the fullest by
this slight but significant touch of the
"life to come."
'Ray! A Breeze!
As we approached an opening that
glimmered far ahead, the stifling heat
began to lessen and the smallest o
breezes began to be felt. Then we
burst out into the open space near the
engineering shops, where the room
left after the old boiler plant had been
removed gave a ventilation that made
the remaining distance - through the

Service. Rev. Lloyd Merl Wal-
- lick, the Lutheran student
pastor, will preach. =
-I - 1111tltll111lt111111111O
ZION LUTHERAN -
SCHURCH
E Fifth Ave. and Washington St.
= REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
= Pastor
= A gospel that reaches down
- to the bottom needs of men, and
offers them redemption 'from
sin, alone is able to save a sin-
stricken world. The Gospel of
. Christ is the power of God unto -
= salvation. _
10: 30 A. M.-"Loving Him Who
First Loved Us."0-
7:30,P. M. - "Adoring Him
Whom We Cannot Compre-
]hend." --
- Both services English. a l

II

"MUSICAND MORALITY"

The Minister will speak on

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

'I

Festival Sunday, May 22,

PRICES-Nights and Saturday Matinees, 50c to $2.00.
All Other Matinees, 25c to $1.00.
Matinee Every Day at 2:15 -at Popular Prices.

Cr
The Choir renders a Special Program of R,

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