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May 22, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-22

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[ION

~r~fr inRRaiu

ASSOCIAlT
PRESS
D)AY AN) NIGHTI
SERVICE

No. 163. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MAY 22, 1921. PRICE FIVE

FALLS
POWERF UL
IC Of DIXON,

'1

RTEEN HITS COMBIN'E
PITCHING TO WIN
12 TO 3

WITH

" AROONS SCORE TWO
RUNS ON ERRtORS
Best Efforts of Opposition Fail to
Halt Procession of
Runs -
Chicago, May 21. - One more vic-
tory Was added to the growing total
of the University of Michigan base-
ball nine here today when the Wol-
verines swamped the University of
Chicago by the overwhelming count
of 12 to 3. With Dixon twirling ball
for the winners the Maroons never
had a chance, being able to garner
but five well scattered hits off his
delivery, while the Maize and Blue
artillery barraged the Chicago de-
fense with 13 well placed blows.
Five Michigan erros contributed
two of Chicago's three runs, but one
Maroon marker being earned. The
Windy City nine used two moundmen
in a desperate attempt to stem the
tide of Wolverine runs which stream-
ed across the home p'ate, but- the
Maize and Blue seemed to score al-
most at will. Chemik started for the
Maroons but was soon retired in fav-
or of Yardley,, who fared -ittle better.
Tight fielding by the Chicagoans pre-,
vented their opponents from running
up an even greater count, and there
were times when one more hit would
have meapt additional runs. Further
hitting was unnecessary, however, for
Dixon kept Chicago at his mercy
from strt to finish and was never
in trouble.
SiBE'ANQUET
SETRTOMO01RROW
Staffs of All Campus Ppers Invited
to Annual Affair by Board
in Contro,
PRES. 1. L. BURTON WILL BE,
GUEST OF HONOR AT DINNER
More than 300 people, including
members of the staffs of the various
campus publications, members of the
faculty, and guests, will be present
at the banquet to be given to the
members of the staffs by the Board
in Cotrol, of Student Publications at
6:30 o'clock Monday evening in the
assembly room of the Union.
According to the arrangements, the
event will be one of the largest af-
fairs of this kind ever held here.
Prof. F. N. Scott, chairman of the
Board in Control of Student Publica-
tions, will act as toastmaster of the
evening and addresses will be deliv-
ered by editors and editors-elect of
the publications and by members of
the faculty.
President Marion L. Burton will be
the guest of honor of the evening and
will deliver an address on "The Pur-
pose of Publicity in University Life".
His talk will deal mainly with the
attitude of the publications on the
campus and the 'benefit derived from
them.,
Addresses will also be given by
Gedrge 0. Brophy, '22L, managing
editor of The aDily, and LeGrand A.
Gaines, '21E, business manager of
The Daily. Special musical features
will be presented during the course
of the evening.

1. t. T. WINS NEW ENGLAND
TRACK, FIELD CHAMPIONSHIP
Cambridge, Mass., May 21.---Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology to-
day won the track and field cham-
pionship of the New England Inter-
collegiate Athletic association, defeat-
ing 15 other college combinations.
Technology scored 46 points, being 2

Triangles Take
Ten Initiates
Triangles, honorary junior engin-
eering society, initiated yesterday. The
walk through the Engineering arch
received a thorough scrubbing in the
afternoon, when 10 sophomores used
their skill and backs in an attempt to
erase the trinagle in its center.
The initiates were: F. E. Camp, F.,
C. Cappon, P. GJ Goebel, F. A. Horn,
J. E. Johns, C. M. Kindel, T. J. Lynch,
r. G. Reason, R. H. Rowland, and R.
C. Stearnes.
Members and initiates'attended a
banquet last night at the Union. Prof.
William C. Hoad spoke for the faculty,
R. E. Grindley, '21E, for the alumni;
Emerson Swart, '22E, for the active,
members, and P. G. Goebel for the in-
itiates. E. H. Fox, '22E, acted as
toastmaster. s
VARSITY SWAMPS
MROONS IN DUAL
MEET, 1080TO

Ble

EDITORS OPPOSE
"PRO" BALL RULE
AT LAST MEETING]

TEN .JOURNALISTS VOTE ON
PRESENT ELIGIBILITY
REQUIREMENTS $

WOLVERINES SC(RE HEAVILY
ALL EVENTS, TAKING 11
FIRSTS

IN

HOFFMAN BREAKS FIELD
MARK IN JAVELIN TOSS

Butler and Simmons High Point
l or Michigan; Hall Scores
For Chicago

Ten

Michigan's overwhelming 108 to 27
track victory over Chicago yesterday
almost culminated in a tragedy when
the 16 pound hammer slipped from1
the hurler's grasp and crashed to the
ground within a foot of Sargent of
Michigan and Hall of Chicago, who
were standing at the start of the 220E
low hurdle straight away.3
Sargent Injured'
The wire handle of the hammer hit1
Sargent on the arm, breaking two
blood vessels and tearing the numbert
off his back. The heavy part of the
missile missed the Michigan hurler's
head by only six'inches. This accide
prevented Sargent's appearance ini
low hurdles, and in spite of this sev-
ere scare, Hall entered the barrier
race, wlich he won in the remarkably 1
fast time of 24 3-5 seconds, a few feet1
ahead of Swift and Cruikshank of
Michigan.'
Michigan's athletes were compelled
to extend themselves in only a few
events to take 11 out of 15 first places,
and in' seven of them the. Maize and
Blue tracksters scored, slams. ,Hall
of Chicago was the high point man of#
the meet, scoring 33 counters through
firsts in the low hurdles and the pole
vault and a second in the high hurdles
for almost half the Maroon total. Four
firsts, a second, and four thirds wereE
all that the Midway men could count
in the meet.
One Ferry field record was smashed
when Hoffman got under the javelinI
for a toss of 182.1 feet, and Dunne al
few minutes later heaved the weed a
180, also going beyond the previous
field mark. The former mark was 172
feet, 10 inches, made by Hoffman last
June in the Western Conference meet.
Captain =Butler - and Simmons tied
for second high honors with two first,
places each. The Wolverine leadgr
ran a nice 440 in :50 3-5, being closely
followed to the tape by Lewis and
Wheeler'of Michigan, and he also won
the half mile in the rather slow time
of 2:02 1-5 with Burkholder and Doug-
las practically tying for second al-
though the judges awarded Burk the
place.
Michigan's distance men in the two
mile upset the dope by taking first and
second. Standish ran a nice race for
his win, although the' time 10:02 2-5. is
slow.
Crulkshank Takes Second
Cruikshank was not up to his us-
ual form, for he only got second in
a poor broad jumping contest won by
Lewis of Michigan and a third in the
low hurdles. Hall went above Naylor
in the pole vault for an unexpected
Chicago. first, and Redmon lived up
to expectations by defeating Stipe in
the hammer throw.
Continued on Page Four)
m'TI U 3T1i A m 1Vu7D

B. P. CAMPBELL, '22,'
ELECTED PRESIDENT
L. A. Kern, '22, Chosen to Head Radio
News Serilee Between Schools
of Conference
' c
Drawing up a resolution pertain-
ing to professional baseball playersi
in Conference games, electing officers1
for 1922, and choosing Minnesota as
the place where the next conventionl
will be held, were some of the more
important things . accomplished at
the second part of the first meetingl
of the newly formed Western Confer-
ence Editorial association yesterday
morning in the Union.
The following resolution was adopt-
ed to express the feeling of the Big
Ten editors concerning ineligibility of
Conference basebaH players who have
played professionally: "We, the
Western Conference Editorial asso-
ciation, believe that professionalism
destroys the spirit of sportsmanship
which should control intercollegiate
athletics and stand firmly against any
trend which countenances any such
demdralization in the Western Con-
ference.
"However, believing also that col-
lege baseball players who engage in;
summer semi-professional baseball
for money with which to pay their
school expenses do not do so for the
express purpose of earning a liveli-
hood or for the purpose of commer-
eializing either himself or the sport,
we see no harm in allowing such men
to engage in colle'ge baseball and
recommend that the Big Tft athletic
officials make some provision which
will permit them to remain eligible.
Other Policies Upheld
"We further believe that all the
requirements of eligibility for Var-
sity athletic teams and especially
those pertaining to scholarship and
two year .registration be strictly en-
forced."
A strong sentiment was expressed
for the adoption of radio-news serv-
ice among Conference schools next
year, besides the establishment of a
regular Weste.rn Conference Press
service. L. Armstrong Kern, '22, was
appointed chairman of intraConfer-1
ence radio-news service. All Confer-
ene universities have radio sta-
tions.. '
Brewster P. Campbell, '22, manag-
ing editor-elect of The Daily, was
elected president of the Western Con-
ference Editorial association to serve
during the year 1921-1922. Thomas
W. Phelps,- managing editor of the
Minnesota Daily, was elected 'vice-
president of the organization, while
Noble C. Butler, managing editor of
the Daily Indiana Student, was
chosen secretary for' the coming
year.
Necessity of developing friendship
and co-operation between the editors
of the Conference universities was
the keynote of the banquet which was
held by the Conference editors last
night at the Union.
Prof. F. N. Scott, of the rhetoric de-
partment, acted as toastmaster and in-
troduced Prof. Ralph W. Aigler, of the
Law school, who spoke on "Confer-
ence Athletics from the Official View-
point." Other speakers of the eve-
ning were: B. P. Campbell, '22,.presi-
dent-elect of the association; Charles
Nelson, editor of the Ohio State Lan-
tern, and Donald Lafuze, editor of the
Daily Illini.
I (Continued on Page Five)
PROPAGANDA INDUCED U. S.
TO ENTER WA1I, IS CLAIM

Ten Sophs Cross
Withering Sands
From their ancient abode in the
East, the mystic worshipers invaded
the realms of Christendom, to return
yesterday with 10 striplings of come-
ly form, rescued from the monotony
of mundane existence. Over the with-
ering sands of the wilderness were the
neophytes dragged, to the halls of
Osiris where in the eternal Book of
the Dead their names were discovered-
in those hieroglyphs never to be pro-
faned by mortal view. Tried and
found worthy, the newly released were
at last entrusted with the dreadful
secret of the Sphinx.
The sophomore fits initiated into
Sphinx, honorary junior literary so-
ciety, were: J. A. Bacon, F. B. Darn-
ton, V. F. Hillery, James Hume, J. J.
Johnson, J. W. Kelly, H. J. Liverance,
W. G: Miller, W. J. Van Orden, and
R. C. Whitlock.
Speakers at the initiation banquet
last night at the Union were: Dr.
Charles P. Wagner for the faculty; R.
A. Campbell, treasurer of the Univer-
sity; k. E. Gault, '21L, and Willis
Blakeslee, '21L, for the alumni; C. M.
Atkinson, '22, for the active class;'and
V. F. Hillery for the initiates. F. M'..
Smith, '22, 'was 'toastmaster.
BIG HIT ATLAST
ENSEMBLE WORK OF SOLOISTS,
CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA
IS FEA TURE
VOICE RANGE SHOWN
BY OPERA SINGERS
Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler Makes Pop-
ular Yesterday Afternoon's
Concert
(By L. A. K.)
With a cast of seven soloists. every
one of them artists, and with adequat,
support' given by the Chicago Sym-
phony orchestra ahd the University
Choral union, Verdi's dramatic opera
"Aida" was rendered in full last night
and thus brought to a fitting close one
of the most successful of May Festival
programs.
The work of every member of the
cast was exceptionally well done, Miss
Lenora: Sparkes, in the leading part
of Aida, showed an unusual depth of
feeling in the rendition of her part.
Her voice seemed on the whole a
trifle light in quality for a part of
this character, but her apparent sym-
pathy in the handling of the "lead"
was sufficient to offset any natural
deficiencies of such at minor nature.
Mme. Cyrena Van Gordon's voice
on the other hand, showed wonderful
power combined with an exceptionally
broad range. Her work in the tragic
(Continue4- on Page Six)
'Delta Sigma Rho,
Chooses 8lNen

Bulletin

(By Associated Press)
Wasihington, May 21.-The senate
itself will decide the claims of Sena.
tor Newberry and Henry Ford to the
seat from Michigan, prominent Repub-
licans said today, independent of the
supreme court's recent decision dis-
missing corruption charges against
Senator Newberry.
Decision to 'have the senate pro-
ceed with the Ford-Newberry case, it
was said, has been reached informally
and a definite amnouncement of the
plan is expected when the senate priv-
ileges and elections committee meets
''uesday.
ON T
Last Program of. Year Will Consist
of Address on "Campus
Problems"
HOLD OPEN FORUM LATER'
ON QUESTION OF "EVOLUTION"
Endorsed by President Marion L.
Burton, by whom he will be introduc-
ed, George Sherwood Eddy, Y. M. C.
A. secareary for Asia, who is inter-
nationally known as a student work-
er- will speak on "Campus Prob-
lems" at the last Union service of
the year, at 8 o'clock this evening in
Hill auditorium.
Yale Graduate
Mr. Eddy is a Yale graduate of the
class of 1891 and holds several hon-
orary degrees. He has worked among
the students of India, where he was
for & time national Y. M. 'C. A. sec-
retary, and among the students of Ja-
pan, China, Korea, and Russia after
his appointment as secretary for Asia.
He rhas recently been speaking at a
numler of American colleges and uni-
versities.
' The prayer and scripture 'lesson
will be given by Rev. Allyn K. Fos-
ter, of the Northern Baptist conven-
tion, and the presiding officer will be
C. ,Stewart Baxter, '21, president of
the S. C. A.
To Hold Open Forum
Immediately after the meeting
Mr Eddy and Rev. Poster will con-
duct an open forum on the subject of
"Th'e Christian Attitude on Evolu-
tion - An Answer to W. J. Bryan"
Students and ficulty members are
invited to attend. Mr. Eddy will re=
main until tomorrow night in order
to address another gathering of stu-
dents at 8 o'clock similar to that of
tonight.

DETROIT NORTHWESTERN WINS
TWENTY-FIRST' ANNUAL MICHIGi
INTERSCHOLASTIC TRACK

SNIDER OF WINNING TEAM
HIGH POINT WINNER
OF DAY
FAST TIME MADE IN
HALF MILE AND
Clean Sweep Made by Detroit Se
When Eastern Takes Second a
Highland Park Third
Three prep schools from the
metropolis outclassed their riva
taking the first three places in D
igan's twenty-first annual inters
astic track and field meet yest
morning. Northwestern High Sc
of 'Detroit won first place by acc
lating 42 1-2 points, Detroit Ea
took second with 23 5-6 points,
Highland Park High School of
troit garnered 14 points. The
troiters, however, were concede
have strength as all three of
aggregations won places in both
Kalamazoo Normal interscho
and the Kalamazoo 'college meet
her in the year.
A Notable Victory
The Northwestern prep s
stars have the distinction of bein
first state high school to win a :
igan interscholastic since S
high accomplished this feat in
This team also had the meet's
est point winner in Snider, whc
able to acquire 16 points. Sn
closest competitor was Haggerty
silanti high srhool's one man
who succeeded in getting 10 p
in both hurdle races.
The half mile event was pro
the prettiest race of the meet.
of saginaw Arthur Hill, was le
his nearest man by a 'good ma
wten near the finish, Wannan
of Highland Park High, with a
tiful final sprint, beat him to
tape by inches. The time was
The'220 yard dash was anotl
teresting race. In a dead heat,
man, of Detroit Northwestern,
ed his competitor and ' out
Voelker, of Detroit Eastern,'-by
ing -out his chest at the finish
quarter mile was also closely
tested. McCausland, of Detroit'
ern, won this event in the fast
school time of 52 1-5. Scott HiJ
Toledo, won the relay in 1:34
Cups Presented
The awards of the meet were
rented at a luncheon at the L
yesterday noon. Silver loving
were given to the winning
runners up, the highest indiv
point winner, his closest compe
and to the winning relay team.
silver, and bronze medals,- with
propriate insignia thereon were
en to /first, secoAd, and third
winners, respectively, while ri
were awaredd to all those who p
fourth.
(Continued on Page Four)

As a recognition of the work done
along oratorical lines, Delta Sigma
Rho, national honorary public speak-
ing fraternity, initiated eight mem-
bers yesterday. The initiates were:
Leon E, Grubaugh, '22, William H.
Frankhauser, Jr., '22L, Preston' H.
Scott, '22, Byron F. Field, '21e Edward
T. Ransdell, '23, John A. Bacon, '23,
R. Devera Steinberg, '22, and Ralph R.
Johnson, '23.i
Following the usual custom the of-,
ficers for the coming year were elect-
ed from the new members. They are:
President, Byron F. Field, '21; vice-
president, Edward T. Ramsdell, '23;
secretary-treasurer, Preston H. Scott,
'22. A short business session followed
the election.
The initiation banquet is to be held
June '6 in connection with the Univer-
sity oratorical board. Definite plans
will be announced later.
r Soccer Team Wins Championship
Michigan's informal soccer team'
yesterday defeated the, Roses, of De-
troit, Michigan state champions, by
the score of 5 to 0. Dyason and San-
chez starred for Michigan, the entire
It.n aA il nntnlocni'n a - h irnn

WESBROOK' TRICKEN.
- WITH APPENDICITIS.
(BY Bob Angell, Special Corres- 3
pondent)w
Ithaca, N. Y., May 21.-Michiganr
hopes for the Conference tennis title3
received a telling blow here this aft-z
ernoon when Walter Wesbrook, court1
captain and track star, was strickent
with appendicitis and operated on atf
the Cornell infirmary. The operation'
was a complete success and Captain
Wesbrook is 'resting easily tonight,R
but it means that he has competed fori
Michigan for the last time, as he is,
to receive his degree in June..
Despite the absence'of their lead-I
er the 'Wolverine tennis team? had no'
difficulty in downing Cornell, four
matches to none, in the hottest weath-
er of the year in- this city. The great
intensity' of the heat caused the can-
celling of the doubles matches, but
this made no difference in the final
outcome as Michigan had taken all
of the four singles matches played
previously, each match going three
sets. Munz defeated Mallory, 6-4, 6-8,
8-6; Angell defeated Pennock, 2-6,
6-2, 6-4; Merkel defeated Fisher, 5-7,'
6-1, 6-4: Reindel defeated Cassidv.

I
PREY, '22, CHOSEN
'ENSIAN EDI
James G. Frey, '22, was
yesterday by the Board in Co
Student Publications of his
ment as managing editor c
year's Michiganensian, whic
made upon resignation of F
Swart, '22E, who was appoi
this position a short time be
election as president of the 14
Union.
Swart's resignation was I
accordance with the general
the Board in Control of Stude
lications which provide that "
aging editor or business :
may accept any appointment
other office or position in ai
campus organization for any
the time covered by his pu
appointment , without first c
the consent of the board".
Badgers Defeat Northwestern
Madison', 1lis., May 21.-I
versity of Wisconsin baseba
defeated Northwestern today
A home run by Captain Ellic
first inning which scored 1
n1 n A- ; 1 .. .... 4--- 7..

Washington, May 21.-Investigation
by a special house .,committee of
charges that propaganda was circulat-
ed to get the United States into the
World War is proposed in a resolution
introduced today by Represeitative
F Michaleson, Republican, Illinois. The
ra nl~i n MOO fn nr + n i -

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