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May 20, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

EAT HE R
OUDY; RISING
RATURE

I

rtinan

a~ADAY

161.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, MAY 20, 1921.

;HOLASTIC
15 PREP
L ATHLETES'

"ELIJAH," SECOND
FESTVAL CONCERT
WELL ,PRESENTED
CHORUS, ORCHESTRA AND ORGAN
BLEND IN PERFECT PRO.
DUCTION

TRIAL EVENTS SCHEDULED FOR
TWO O'CLOCK THIS AFT-
ERNOON
MEET PROPER STARTS
AT 9:30 ON SATURDAY
Only Two Out of State Teams Eater-
ed; Michigan Aggregations
Favored to Take Meet
More than 175 prep school track
and field athletes representing 19 dif-
ferent high schools will arrive in Ann
Arbor today to compete for honors in
Michigan's twenty-first alnual inter-
scholastic track and field meet.;
Meet Begins at 9:30
All trial events are scheduled to be "
run off on Ferry field this afternoon
at 2 o'clock, and the meet proper will
start at 9:30 o'clock Saturday morn-
ing. The dual Michigan-Chicago track
meet Saturday afternoon makes it ne-
cessary to run off the interscholastic
in. the morning.
A Michigan high school has not won
this annual affair since 1910 but there
is little doubt but that a state team
will cop this year -for there are but
two teams represented from statesa
other than Michigan. University highr
of Chicago, last year's high point
winners, is not entered this year. By
virtue of their championship last May,
the Illinois prep school won the
handsome Sid Millard cup, an award
that was put up for the team that
should first win three meets.
Interseholastics Goniect
Other conflicting Conference inter-'
scholastics is given as the reason for
so few out-of-the-state entries this
year. Illinois and Indiana are holding'
meets the same date while the Stagg
meet at ,Chicago and Ohio State's in-i
terscholastic at Columbus are planned
for next week.7
(Continued on Page Thtee) '
CHIMES APPEARSTODAY
IN LAST ISSUE OF YEAR

I

SOLOISTS

FILL ROLES

LUCRETIA BORI, THE SOLOIST AT
the May Festival Concert Tonight in
Hill Audtiorium.
81' TEN EDITORS

Conference Editorial Body Will
to Foster Inliercollegiate
Co-operation y

Aim

RALPH M. CARSON AND
WAGNER CONTRIBUTE
ARTICLES

ROB

With a cover carrying a two color
photograph of Pete Van Bven, cap-
tain of the Varsity baseball team, in
the act of making a sensational catch,
the May issue of the Chimes which-is
the last of the year, will be put on
sale today at the news stands. An-
other baseball picture, the frontispiece
of the number, shows Captain Van
Boven, Coach Fisher, and "Slicker"
Parks, former Varsity pitcher.
"Oxford Through "American Eyes,"
by Ralph M. Carson, '17, who is now
a Rhodes scholar at Oriel college, Ox-
ford, is the leading article in the mag-
azine. Another called "Your Oppor-
tunities in the Movies" is from the
type writer of Rob Wagner, '95, who
is said to have had 24 of his articles'
about the moving picture world print-
ed in the Saturday Evening Post.
"Is Student Government Possible?"
by James I. McClintock, '21L, is a dis-
cussion of a campus question of In-
terest to students in these days of
faculty regulation. "A Half-Hour. on
Ferry Field" is a fictitious . dialogue
between a student and a professor
concerning the members of Michi-
gans' 'baseball nine by Clarence
Hatch Jr., '23.
An informal appreciation of the
work of Prof. Albert A. Stanley ap-
pears in "A Page About Professor'
Stanley", by Stewart T. Beach, '22.
The only piece of fiction in the mag-
azine is a short story by Chester -N.
Hess, '23, "Two Are Taught", with an
illustration by' Hunter G. Griffith, '21.
300 SENIORS TURN OUT FOR
SECOND SING; AUDIENCE LARGE
Arrayed in cap and gown and ac-
companied by the Varsity band, more
than 300 seniors turned out for the
second Senior sing which was held
at 7 o'clock last night on the steps of

NEWS SERVICE AND COLLEGE
BASEBALL TO BE DISCUSSED
Editors of the various publications
in the Conference will arrive in Ann
Arbor this morning and register from
10 to 12 o'clock at the Union for the
first convention of its kind among the
Big Ten schools.
The delegates will meet at 1:30
o'clock this afternoon for the pur-
pose of organizing and discussing va-
rious university problems. Tonight
they will witness the Cap night cer-
emonies, while tomorrow's program
will include attending the track meet
in the afternoon and a banquet in'the
evening.
A Conference Editorial association
will be formed with the idea of
bringing about a better understand-
ing between the universities involv-
ed and arriving at common decisions
regarding campus and journalisti
problems. Yearly conventions will be
provided for
Amoug the questions to be dis-
cussed will be the eligibility of ath-
letes playing professional baseball
and the Intercollegiate News service.
The program for today is as follows:
10 to- 12 o'clock, registration at
Union; 12. o'clock, luncheon at fra-
ternity houses; 1:30 to 5 o'clock,
meeting at Union; 6 o'clock, dinner at
fraternity houses; 7 o'clock, Cap night
ceremonies.
CONCERT BY, MUSICAL
CLUBS NXT THURSDAY
Music, impersonations, and comedy
skits will feature the annual spring
concert of the Musical clubs of the
Michigan Union which will be held on
Thursday evening, May 26, at Hill au-
ditorium.
Prof. William Wheeler, of the School
of Music, is in charge of the Glee club,
Prof. F. L. Thomas, also of the School
of Music, is conducting the rehearsals
'of the Mandolin club, and E. Mortimer
Shuter will direct the dramatic num-
bers. ,
The program will offer a variety of
entertainment in the form of old and:
new song hits Interspered with spec-
ialty act.
WHIMSIESTO GIVE
NAMES OF EDITORS
When the May number of Whim-
sies goes on sale Saturday the stu-
-dent body will no longer need won-
der who is responsible for the latest
addition to Michigan's publications.
For this issue 'will contain the per-
sonnel of the editorial board. The
May issue will also differ from. the
previous ones in that it will appear
in printed form. This will make the
magazine available to the public.
Clement* A. Smith, '23, has been
awarded the Oxford Book of English
Verse, offered for the best verse sub-
mitted. Smith's work, "Mallards in
February", will appear with many
other student poems, the entire mag-

WITH, FINE SINGING
Finish and Artistry of Choral Work
Tribute to Careful Training
by Dr. Stanley
{By D.M.
"Elijah," the Mendelssohn oratorio,
unsurpassed in wealth of popular and
well known airs and choruses, was
presented last evening as the second
concert of the May Festival series by
the University Choral union and Chi-
cago Symphony orchestra under the
direction of Dr. A. A. Stanley.
From start to finish the orchestra,
organ, chorus and talented 'solists
blended in a satisfying ensemble,
painting this beautiful, ancient story
in scene after scene of musical color
in a way long to be remembered by
the delighted; audience.
- Harrison Sings Well
Theodore Harrison carried the bari-
tone role with dignity, singing the
"Lord, God of Abraham," and "It Is
Enough," with traditional beauty.
Vertiable story-telling powers of his
singing voice were coupled with re-
markable dramatic ability.
Mme. Hinkle's brilliant soprano
voice was particularly effective in
"Hear Ye, Israel," and the duet "Help
Me, Man of God."
Lambert Murphy's voice was at its
best in "If With All Your Hearts ",
and "Then Shall the Rigl teus Shine".
Choral Work Good
Mrs. Grace Johnson-Konold sang
the part of the youth effecti'fely.
The devotional quality of the ora-
torio was embodied in the quartet
"Cast Thy Burden Upon the Lord",
and the double quartet, "He Shall
Give His Angel Charge Over Thee".
Particular credit is due to the ex-
cellent choral work,- especially in
'"Thanks Be to God", and "He, Watch-
ing Over Israel". The finish of de-
tail and artistry of attack was a
tribute to Dr. Stanley's training.
Bulletin

COURT TEAM LOSES
TO HAR VARD, 4-2
Cme rde MasMy tennis players on their Eastern trip
again met defeat today, this time at
the hands of 'Harvard recqueteers by
the score of 4 to 2. Wesbrook and
Munz won their singles matches, but
playing together they failed to over-
come Deturrene and Fenno. The oth-
er Michigan players lost their match-
ES.
Summary-Wesbrook (M), defeated.
Fenno (H), 7-5, 6-3. Munz (M), de-j
feated Deturrene (H), 6-4, 1-6, 8-6.
Duane (H), defeated Angell (M), 6-3,
6-1. Seibelman (H), defeated Merkel
(M), 6-1, 6-2. . Deturrene' and Fenno
(H), defeated Wesbrook and Munz
(M), 7-5, 7-5. Duane and Seibelman
(H), defeated Angell and Reindel (M),
6-3, 6-4.
BUR0TON PRAISELS
,S HWOODEDDY
Speaker for Sunday Night University
Service Popular at Other
Universities
"CAMPUS PROBLEMS" GIVEN
OUT AS TOPIC OF ADDRESS
"Sherwood Eddy is one of the out-
standing speakers to college men in
this country at the present time," is
the way President Marion L. Burton
characterized the speaker at the last
of the Union services. of the year,
which will be presented at 8 o'clock
Sunday evening in Hill auditorium.
Graduated from Yale
"The speaker is a Yale graduate,
and his message is based on experi-
ence in practically every country, in
the world," continued President Bur-
ton. "He has an unusual grasp upon
world conditions. Any student who
hears him will, I am sure, feel that
he has made good use of his time."
Mr. Eddy is here at the invitation
of President Burton, who was very
favorably impressed with him at a se-
ries of meetings held by Mr. Eddy'
at the University of Minnesota last
year. President Burton himself will
introduce the speaker Sunday night,
Will Deal with Etides
The subject of the speaker's ad-
dress will be "Campus Problems", in
which he will probably deal with the
ethics and morality of the college
man. Most of his talks are on topics
of a similar nature, and their popu-
larity is attested by the reports from
other colleges.

CAP NIGHT ANNOUNCEMENTS
TIME
The entire student body will
assemble on the campus prompt-
ly at 7 o'clock.
WHERE THE CLASSES MEET
Band-In front of Hill auditor-
ium.
Seniors-East side of court be-
tween Natural Science and
Chemistry buildings.
Juniors--On Ingalls street just
east of Hill auditprium.
Sophomores-Between Law and
Natural Science buildings.
Freshmen-On sidewalks in front
of Library.
LINE OF MARCH
West on North Univeristy ave-
nue to State street, north on
State to Ann street, east on Ann
street to Sleepy Hollow.
TRAFFIC REGULATIONS
By order of Acting Chief of
Police O'Brien no cars will be
parked or driven on Ann street
Friday night. Traffic on Observ-
atory street will be toward the
north only.
Neophytes Will
Enter Triangles,
S phinx Saturday
(By.C.B.)
Bllisters galore, made by t he
scorching sands of the desert and the
merciless rays of the sun, will cause
the 10 sophomore neophytes who are
to work their way tomorrow into that
honorary Egyptian literary society
known as Sphinx untold agony as
they cross the famous desert of Sa-
hara. But on the other side of 'the
campus, those followers of the tin-
shop who are fortunate enough to be
invited to scrub the engineering
arch, 10 select sophomore engineers-
Triangle neophytes-they, only they
will know the bliss experienced by
washwomen as deepen and deeper
their hands merge into soapy suds
only to emerge again and toscrape
on rentless, ungiving cement and
bricks.
Ah!'As the sun rises tomorrow, all
will not be well. As th.e sun sets to-
morow night, the mad endeavor of the
.sophofmore neophytes will draw to a
close. They will banquet in the
Union and, once again, .,the campus
will witness an increase in the ranks
of Sphinx and Triangles - the Wa-
gathana bird will hold full. sway, his
way shall reach a head.
The new members of Sphinx and
Triangles will be announced in Sun-
day's Daily.
TEN INITIATED BY
WEB AND FLANGE
Web and Flange, honorary senior
civil engineering society held its in-
itiation yesterday afternoon for 10 men
in front of the Enginering arch. The
initiates gravely surveyed the diagon-
al through a pop bottle on top of three
broom sticks and laid out minature
railroads to the amusement of the
onlookera.
The following '22 men were initiat-
ed: C. S. Finklener, C. S. Warner, J.
A. Riggs, W. E. Baudemer, M. A. Goetz,
G. W. McCordie, J. D. Cruise, H. S.

Simpson, W. P. Lyons, H. C. Carpen-
ter.
SOPH LITS VOTE TODAY TO
CHOOSE STUDENT COUNCILMEN"
r v
Sophomore lits will vote today from
10 o'clock this morning until 2 o'clock
this afternoon to elect two student
representatives to the Student council
due to errors on the All-campus bal-
lot which invalidated the vote. A

CLASSES MARC;
LOW LED
SEl
HESTON, '04
AND PROF.
Cheers, Rand Se
Speeches o

Men of the class o
their freshman caps
today for the last tin
serving the Cap night
will burn thpir caps
low -in the presence O1
dent bod, gathered t
the ceremonies marki
of anotherfreshman c
of sophomores.
Meeting on the ca
at 7 o'clock at places
the committee in char
the various classes w:
cession in the order
i'y. Students are rec
off the grass. Follow
band and led by the
and gowns, the '
march north on State
street, and then east
to Sleepy Hollow.
Classes Take
There the freshmen
places at the extrem
field. Seniors, junio
mores will have secti
the order-named, frox
Red lights are to de
tions for the different
persons other than s-
quested to wait until
seated before they ll
ground.
Cheers by the asse
tions by the Varsity 1
the beginning of the
which LeGrand A. Ga
ter of ceremonies, will
Lewis M. Gram, facu
the evening. Profess
present the M blanket
athletes.
Band Leads i
"Varsity" will be p
band'and sung by tb
der the direction of A
'22E, following the pi
the blankets. Albert
will then .give the o
student body, and Wil
'04L, will bring a me
alumni to the studen
tors" will be sung d
mission between the l
At the cnclusion0
everyone will stand
Yellow and Blue" an
O Where Are -the V
men?" as the freshme
dance and circle ar
throwing their outgo
flames. Falling in be
band, they will cont
dance and come back i
ness the- free movies
Arbor theaters have p
occasion.
Free Modes I
Other classes will
Sleepy Hollow, leavi
undisputed right-of.
march from the field
been, made that the s
cate the courtesy of :
agers and avoid rush
ing as they enter the
Student councilmen
committeemen with b
as officials in preserv
are empowered to en
regulations for the e
cial effort will be n
students from tran
ground adjacent to t
sembly on the campu
The regular produci
shown at the free m
cade and Majestic,
having been arranged4

FREME WARPOTS FO
TOY;LLPP ANNUAL CAP NIGHT[

Dr. Hugh Cabot Ho
Washington, May 19.-Edward Dou- Dr. Hugh Cabot
glass White, chief justice of the Su- . hospital is holding
preme court of the United States, this afternoon befor
died here today at 2 o'clock. The the Detroit Surgica
Chief Justice did not arouse from the ing to an announc
coma into which he sank late Tuesday. hospital yesterday.

Ads Surgical Clinic
of the University
a special clinics
re the members of
al society, accord-
ement from the

Lucretia oi, Childress' Chor'us,
Star In Festival. Concerts Today

(By S. B.C.)
May, Festival concerts on today's
program are two in number: the chil-
dren's concert, under the direction of
George Oscar Bowen at 2:30 o'clock
in Hill auditorium, and a miscellane-
ous program by the Chicago Sym-
phony orcoestra, Frederick Stock,
conductor, and, Lucretia Bori, soprano
soloist at 8 o'clock.
Chorus Opens Concert
The children's chorus will open the
concert with a group of short songs
and will end the program in the, same
manner. The feature number for the
chorus will be a cantata for chil-
dren's chorus and baritone solo, "The
Voyage of Arlon" (first performance),
written by Earl V. Moore of the
University School of Music. The dif-
ficulties involved in writing for chil-
dren's voices have been carefully tak-
en into consideration by this writer,
and the work should prove an un-
usual success.
Chase Sikes, '17, a baritone well
known in musical circles, and Marian
Struble, violinist, will be the solo-
ists at, this concert. Mr. Sikes will
sing the baritone role in the cantata
and a group of songs including work
of Handel and Densmore. Miss Stru-
ble will play Wieniawski's Romance
and Allegro from his concerto in D

Bori Successful,
Lucretia Bori of the Metropolitan.
Opera company, to be heard at the
evening.-concert, is an artist who has
made successes wherever she has
sung. She is said to be the best loved
of all the singers of the New York"
company. The first appearance which
she made with the Metropolitan was
in "Manon". Her beauty, the in-
telligence of her acting, the freshness
of her voice, and the personal charm
which radiates from her when she
sings brought congrafulations to the
company for its new find.
The complete -program for this eve-
ning's performance is as folows:
Choral and Fugue, G min9r......
............ .. ..... Bach-Abert
Aria: "Giunse alfin ii momento",
from "Marriage of Figaro"..Mozart
Symphonic Poem, "Attis", Op. 16
(by special request)..A. A. Stanley
Intermission , .
"Mephisto" Waltz.............Liszt
Aria: "Depuis le jour", from
"Louise".............Charpentier
Suite, "Woodland", A minor, Op.
42 ..................MacDowell
I. "In a Haunted Forest"; II.
"Summer Idyll"; III. "The
Shepherdess' Song"; IV.
"Forest Spirits".
Aria: "Mi chiamano Mimi", from
"La Boheme". .. .......Puccini

.r

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