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May 14, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-14

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, MAY 14, 1921.

PRICE FIVE CXNTS

29 Classes Plan 4(eunion On June
28; '71_Representatives Oldest

ILL
ONT

iE

) KILLED
FIGHTING

Members of 29 classes will assem-
ble here on June 28 for the annual
class Reunion day. The oldest class
to be represented is that of '71, which,
expects to have every living member
here for its meetings. Out of the
67 who graduated with this class 25
are now living. All who have thus
far responded to the secretary's call
have agreed to come.
Luncheon Arranged
The reunion this year is arranged
for three days - Tuesday, Wednes-
day, and Thursday of Commenucement
week, June 28, 29, 30. President
Emeritus Harry B. Hutchins, who was
orator of his class in '71, will give a
luncheon to the members at tht Bar-
ton Hills club.
The Dix Plan of class reunions will
be tried by 12 classes. These are '75,
'76, '77, '78, '94, '95, '96, '97, '13, '14,
'15, '16. The Dix Plan is asystem

whereby classes are rotated so that
during their reunions four groups
come together. The first year they
are rated as freshmen, at the next
reunion as sophomores, and so forth.
After they become seniors, the rota-
tion starts all over.
The classes of '13, '14, '15, '16 plan
to hold one of their biggest reunions
under this system. A get-together
dance at the Union will be one of the
special features.
'18 Makes Plans
Plans for the '18 reunion have been
decided upon and notices .are being
sent out to the embers. It is prob-
able that the nn will have a dinner
on Tuesday of Commencement week
and that the women will also have a,
meeting at that time. A picnic or
frolic up the river is planned for.
both men and women on Wednesday,
June 29.

Ed to

Villiamson, W. Va., May 13. -
untain warfare, which raged all
terday and :intermittently through
night over a seven mile front in
West Virginia - K'entucky coal
Ike region, was resumed with vigor
s morning. Reports sent to Capt.
SBrockus of the state police at
adquarters here said heavy firing
s in progress at McCarr, Ky., the
tern end of the trouble zone and
Merrimac, W., Va., where yester-
's shooting started. Sporadic rifle
a could - be heard. along the West
ginia and Kentucky borders at
tewan.
Casualties Reported
kn unidentified man was killed on
bridge leading from McCarr to
West Virginia bank of Tug river
a morning, bringing the known
,ualtles to three killed and two
4nded. This includes a member of
attacking pary reported killed at
Carr last night'.
ohief Deputy Sheriff .John Hall left
liamson this morning with sup-
aes of ammunition for the detach-
!t of state police statiod ed at,
rigg, one of the towns in yester-
r's battle zone. ,
People Await News
knxiously the people of the upper
g river valley, where a battle raged
terday between the4orces of the
te riflemen hidden in the moun-
ns, awaited this morning some news
cerning the request of Governor
rgan that federal troops be sent
o the district.
ECOMMENDATIONS
MADE FOR S. C. A.
3ombining of both the men's and
men's departments of the Stu-
t Christian association in one
iding was recommended by the ex-
itive committee of the S. C. A. board
trustees, at a meeting held yester-
r in Lane hall. This decision was
bodied in one of several resolutions
>pted by the committee yesterday
ar result of the action of a num-
rof the women students of the Uni-
sity Thursday in affiliating with
* national Y. W. C. A. At present
Wwomen's "department is housed in
wberry hall.
knother recommendation made by
committee was that the plans and
icies of the S. C. A. be carried
according to the charter and by-
rs with only such .changes as smay
made necessary in view of the ac-
a taken by the women students.-
yesterday 's Games
National League
incinnati 5, Brooklyn 4.
Jew York 5, St. Louis 1.
bhicago 4, Philadelphia 2.
Pittsburgh-Boston-rain.
American League
yew York 6, Detroit 4.
loston 16, Chicago 8.
Vashington 4, Cleveland 2.
it. Louis 7, Philadelphia b. "
nn State in 14th Straight Victory
'enn State won its fourteenth con-
utive baseball victory of the sea-
iyesterday, defeating Yale 9 to 3.

FINAL CHEICKON CAMPUS BALLOTS
SHOWS CLOSE RACES FOR OFFICES

_. .._..

I

ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO
TAKE ACTION ON DISCIPLINE
Summary action was taken
yesterday by the membeits of
the Student Advisory commit-
tee, according to . L. McClin-
took, '21L, ehairman, with re-
gard to dealing with the mem-
bers of the sophomore class who
were implicated in the kidnap-
ping of the freshman Spring
games leaders Thursday night.
At the same time it was decided
to bring up the case of those who
are responsible for using green
paint at several places about
the campus.
The committee will meet with
Dean Bursley at 8 :45 o'clock
this morning at which time the
matter will be discussed.
McClintock said last night that
mob discipline of any kind dur-
ing the confing week will not be
tolerated. Offenders will be
,summarily dealt with.

May 21 Date Of
,junior .Lit Dance
Final details for the evening party
of the junior lit class, which is to
be held from 8 to 12 o'clock Saturday
night, May 21, in Barbour gymna-
sium, are being completed by the
class social committee. Chaperones
for the affair will be: Prof. J. W.
Bradshaw and Mrs. Bradshaw, Prof.
W. R. Humphreys and Mrs. Humph-
reys.
"Nobe" Wetherbee's two-piano eight
piece orchestra with entertainers has
been secured and dancing will start
promptly at 8 o'clock. Efforts are be-
ing made to secure the decorations
which the Architects used at their re-
cent ball.
The ticket sale for the dance will
be announced at a later date.
Short Story Contest Ends May 16
Stories for the annual Stylus short
story contest will be dpe May 15.
Manuscripts, which are limited to
5,000 words in length, may be turned
in to Stella Brun, '22, at the rhetoric
library. A prize of $5 will be award-
ed the winner.,
Ohio Wallops Indian 1910
Bloomington, Ind., May 13. - Ohio
defeated Indiana in a Western Con-
ference baseball game here 19 to 10.
Indiana pitchers were hit hard, the
Ohioans collecting 22 hits.

Complete Returns Show Exact Number
of Votes Cast For All
Candidates
SOPH AND JUNIOR LITS WILL #
VOTE AGAIN FOR COUNCILMEN
Final official canvass and checking
up show that a margin of but 13 votes
was the difference in the totals of Em-
erson Swart, '22E, and Archie Mac-
Donald, '22L, candidates for the pres-
idency of the Union in Wednesday's
All-campus election. A typographical'
error in The Daily yesterday made 'the
difference appear 113 votes. Mac-
Donald's total was given erroneously
at 704 when it should have read 794,
the result of another typographical
error.
Canvass Official
The final and official canvass by the
Student council yesterday shows the
exact number of votes received by
every candidate. Below are given the
complete summaries, of every candi-
date's vote. Include'd in the report
are a number of Student council posi-
tions which were only partially re-
ported in The Daily yesterday. No
report is given on the architects' coun-
cil representative, as one of the can-
didates was declared ineligible. Votes
for the junior and sophomore lit,
places on the council were thrown out
because of a mistake in instructions,
whereby voters were 'told to vote for
more men than they should. Class
elections' in the near' future will de-
cide who shall fill the positions.
Following are the final tabulates
returns on all candidates: President
of the Union: Emerson Swart 807,
Archie MacDonald 794, Floyd A. Ser-
geant 755, Edwin A. Krueger 625, John
M. Winters 260. Recording-secretary
of the Union: Frank H. Lee, Jr. 1,126,
George Reindel, Jr. 947, Robert F.
Barie 574.
Union Vive-Prlesidents,
Literary vice-president: Robert J.
Cooper 612, Guy R. Moulthrop 404,
Joseph A. Bernstein 324. Engineering
vice-president: E. F. Moore 350;
George E. Gregory 288, Edmund H.
Fox 283. Medic vice-president: Paul,
M. Moore, Jr. 111, Eugene R. Elzinga
89. Law vice-president: Harry C.
Willson 106, Henry A. McCown 76,
Richey B. Reavill 70. Combined, de-
partments vice-president: Robert F.
Deebach 92, Robert M. Winslow 81,
Donald C. Culver 37, J. Meads 33.
President Student council: Angus
G. Goetz 2,210, Renaud Sherwood' 832.
Student Councilman- at- large (two
elected): "W. W. Gower 990, E. F.
Moore 944, Roland Libonati 795, Stan-
ley Kresge 723; L. Perkins Bull 612,
W. V. Gilbert 590, Clarence Hatch 517.
Student council, junior engineers (two
'(Continued' on Page Six)

QUARTERDECKHAS
SPRING INITIATION
Quarterdeck, honorary marine eng-
ineering society, held its spring initia-
tion Thursday afternoon, followed by
a banquet at the Union Thursday
night. The following men were taken
in at that time: S. B. Smith, '21E, J.
D. Dow, '22E, C. Barnum, '22E, F. W.
Trevorrow, '22E, A. S. Valk, '22E, and
J. Pahlow, '22E.
LAWLESS ACTS SCO RED
STUDENTS NEGLECT ORDINARY
ETIQUETTE IN MISUSE OF ATH-
LETIC PROPERTY
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
It is difficult to understand the
lack of fair mindedness of some peo-
ple which actuates them to violate the
rights of others and even to destroy
property when they think they will
not be called upon to restore same.
Conservatively estimated at least
500 students deliberately cut across
the football field and running track
Thursday afternoon to the marked
discomfort of their fellow students
who were giving time and effort in
preparing themselves to represent
Michigan in track and field events.
Will Ruin Field
It stands to reason that if a pro-
cession of this size is to take place
frequently, a well defined pathway
will soon be in evidence across our
football field, which today is as fine
a playing field as there is in the
country.
Yesterday morning two pairs of
students made use of tennis courts fol-
lowing the rain of the night before,
when their first step on the soft clay
should have demonstrated to the sat-
isfaction of any reasonable person,
that the courts would not be dried
out sufficiently to play on for hours.
One pair wallowed around in clay
which was so sticky that they dis-
carded two tnnis balls in a short
time as being unfit for further play-
ing purposes, and the other pair com-
ing on the courts several hours later,
tore up the best of the two Varsity
courts to such an extent as will re-
quire hours of labor to restore this
court to playing fitness. There are
furthermore some students who seem
to think that they hold a mortgage
on tennis courts for the entire after-
noon. When others are waiting to
play, it would seem that there should
be a disposition on the part of fair
minded persons to surrender the
courts after having played their al-
lotted two sets.
Use Wrong Diamond
Still another type of the "Don't give
a damn for the rights of others" in-
dividuals persist Ain using the Varsity
baseball diamond whenever they think
there is no one around to shoo them
off. At such times of course there are
invariably four other full sized dia-
monds and as many small diamonds
(Continue on Page Six),

a SPHOMORE TArHS 101
FROM YEAHLIN6S BY WINNING
TWO CONTESTS IN TU-O-I

0

MEMBERS COMPOSE BODY;
MINISTERS NOT YET
CHOSEN

Members of the University Union
Serv ce. committee for 1921-22 were
chosen at a meeting of the present
committee Thursday night at Lane
hall. ;Twenty persons will make up,
toe committee: six women, ten men,
three local ministers, and T. S.
Evans, secretary of the Student
Christian association.,
The women members of the com-
mittee are: Edna Groff, '22, Helen
Bishop, '22, Gertrude,. Boggs, '22,
Thekla Roese, '22, Joyce McCurdy,
'22, and Laura Snyder, '22. The men
are: B. P. Campbell, 2, Angus G.
Goetz, '22M, Joseph A. Bernstein, '22,
R. Emerson Swart, '2;E, Walter B.
Rea, '22, F. M. Smith, ''22, George E.
Gregory, '22E, Stewart T. Beach, '22,
Hugh W. Hitchcock, '22, and Renaud
Sherwood, '22.
The ministers who will hold places
on the 'committee have not yt been
chosen by the Minsters' zssoiation.
SENIOR L T S 'WILL
GIVE DANCE TODAY
Admission will be by presentation
of receipts for class dues at the in-
formal dance to be given by the Sen-
for lit class from 2:30 to 5:30,o'clock
this afternoon in Barbourf gymnasium.
Opportunity will be given at the door
to those who have not paid them to
settle with the treasurer.
Attentioz is called to the fact at
this time that unless. dues are paid
up, seniors can neither attend their
class banquet nor participate in,
Commencement week exercises.

GAINES ISSUES ULTIMATUM
Unless Cameron A. Ross, '24E,
captain of the freshmen for the
- Spring xames, and; any other
of the freshmen leaders who may
k under the custody of the soph-
oir re class or its members, or
friends of its members, are re.-
turned by 8 o'clock this morning,
the games will be forfeIted to
to the freshmen.
LE GRAND A. GAINES,
President of the Student Council.
COMMITTE FOR UNIOR
SERVICES SELECTED

CLASSES WILL ASSEMBLE Al
O'CLOCK TODAY ON
CAMPUS
COUNCIL CANCELLES
MIDDLE WEIGHT PU]
Officils State That Games Will
Forfeited in Case Rules Are
Violated
SCHEDULE TODAY
9:00-Sophomores and freshmen
semble for contests, the l1ormer
Waterman gymnasium, the latter
front of the Library.
9:15-Sophomores and freshin
begin march to Ferry field.
9:30-All officials due at Fe
field.
10:00--Spring games at Ferry fi
commence.
Notice
Anyone not wearing tennis sh
will be barred from all contests. A
breaking of the rules whatsoever 1
result in the forfeiture of that d
test.
Under fair skies the sophomo
defeated the freshmen in the' f
contest of the Spring games, the t
of-war, yesterday afternoon b
score of 2 to 0. The middlesei
,Pull was forfeited because both cl
es used unfair means to accomp
their purpose. The remaining 1
contests of the Spring games w
start at 10 o'clock this morning
Ferry field. Members of the sop
more class will assemble at
o'clock at Waterman gymnasium a
the yearlings will gather at the s
time in front of the Library..
. Two Bands in March
Promptly at 3:30 o'clock yester
afternoon the sophomores comme
ed their march for the tug-of-
grounds led by their 25-piece h
More than 700 sophomores were
line at first, but this number
greatly increased as the march p
gressed. Shortly,,after the, sor
mores left the campus, the freshn
headed by 'their 27-piece band,
into line some L1,000 strong. E
classes had donned their war p
and were eager for the games to
mence.
In the first contest, the sol
mores took the east side of the
er. A strong current made it d
cilt to pick up the slack in the r
but the .lightweight pull -started
time at 4 o'clock. For the first
minutes neither side seemed to 9
any advantage, but finally the so
mores pulled their opponents 7
over the line, thus winning the
contest. The opposing classes t
changed banks. It took but 7 m
utes for the sophomores to pull
freshmen into the river in the r
dleweight pull, The gun was fi
and the large group, of spectai
who lined both sides of the river
the bridge thought that the class
(Continued on Page. Six)

WEAR 'PM THIS AFTERNOON, SENIORS!
Michigan meets Iowa in a baseball game on Ferry field this j
afternoon. It is one of a few notable occasions in which the Uni-
versity as a whole will participate between now and the close of
the year. As yet the seniors have been given few opportunities of
appearing as a class in their caps and gowns. Monday and Thurs-
day are the official days for wearning them, but LeGrand A. Gaines,
.Jr., '21E, president of the Student council, urges that the entire
class' appear at the game this afternoon in their senior garments.
It is not- an unusual thing to have the spirit of the opening
days of school begin to wane at this season of the year. ,Nothing,
adds more to the spirit of the closing college days than wearing caps
and gowns by the senior class. Fourth year men and women owe
A to the younger members of the student body to show what class
spirit means right up to the last minute of university life.
The freshman and sophomore classes will appear this morning
to the full strength of their numbers and with the enthusiasm which
knows no bounds. These Spring games have become a tradition
and the underclassmen of each succeeding year attempt to out-do
those classes which have gone before. Is it too much to ask the
senior class of today to set a wororthy an example for the senior
classes of tomorrow? Let 'us make this a memorable day by hav-
ing every man and woman of the fourth year -clash co-operate to
the limit.

BISHOP WILLIAMS UPHELD
IN VIEWS ON FREE SPEECH
Rt. Rev. Charles D. Bishop, D.
D., Michigan Episcopal bishop,
was upheld in his belief in the
American right of free speech
by resolutions passed Thursday
afternoon in the closing session
here of the 88th annual conven-
tion of the. Episcopal diocese of
Michigan. The action was caus-
ed by the resentment of certain
people over the bishop's views
publicly expressed on social and
economic questions.

' ,

i

.,

See Ybur

SENIOR LIT INFORMAL DANCE
Today 2:30 to 5:30 Barbour Gymnasium

Given For
Seno rs

Classmhtes

You

Geo. E. Rogers '21E Orchestra

BringV

a

May Be Paid At Door

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