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May 12, 1921 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-12

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i i5 IV AJ...I7L1..U1V EiAHL I

FICIAL BULLETIN

THURSDAY, MAY 12, 1921.

Number 154.

Students in Engineering:
ill meet in special assembly Thursday, May 12, at 2 p. m. in Room
agineering building. This assembly is called by Dean Cooley for the
of important ,work requiring the presence of every senior. Members
teaching staff will therefore excuse seniors from their 2 o'clock
s. H. H. HIGBIE, Class Mentor.
ers in Engineering:
re requested to excuse their senior students from all classes at 2
on Thursday, May 12, in order to attend an important special assem-
,lled by Dean Cooley. H. H. HIGBIE, Class Mentor.
1 Faculty:
he regular meeting will be held Thursday at 12:15 at the Michigan
MARCUS L. WARD..
lttee on Student Affairs:
meeting of the Senate Committee on Student Affairp will be held in
Bursley's office, Room 2, University Hall, Thursday, May 12, at 4:15
J. A. BURSLEY.
Engineers:
ssembly will be held on Friday, May 13, at 11 o'clock in Room 348,
eering building. Professor Jesse S. Reeves of the Political Science
tment will be the speaker.
A. H. LOVELL, Junior Mentor.
Bering Students:
r. Gardner S. Williams will give an illustrated lecture on "The Engi-
g Features of the St. Lawrence Ship Canal" next Friday at 9 a. m.,
34'8 Engineering building. All are welcome. This is an exceptional
unity to hear about the greatest enterpri'se now before the Ameri-
nd, Canadian governments. HORACE W. KING.
enentary Exanination in Zoology 3a:
hose who were absent from the second examination in Heredity will
supplementary examination in Room 355, Natural Science building,
. m. on Friday, May 13. A. FRANKLIN SHULL.
rsty Lecture:
ofessor Dana C. Munro, of Princeton University, will lecture on "Ad-
ng-in the Middle Ages", Thursday afternoon, May 12, at 4:15, in the
)rium of the New Science building. The lecture is under the auspices
Department of History. All interested are invited.
E. W. DOW.
1 Students: ' "
r. John K. Bacon and Mr. H. Harrison are requested to call at the
office at their earliest opportunity.

Detroit Rector
Here ForAddress
"Welfare Work" is the subject of the
lecture which will be given by Rev.
Samuel S. Marquis, rector of St. Jo-
seph's church of Detroit, at'8 o'clock
this evening in Natural Science audi-
torium. Doctor Marquis was former-
ly head of the sociological depart-
ment of the Ford Motor company, and
speaks here under the auspices of the
@ommerce club.
Doctor Marquis is at present at-
tending the annjal convention of the
Michigan diocese of the Episcopal
church. Last iight at a dinner of
the delegates he was one 'of the
principal speakers.
He is nationally known as a sociol-
ogist, because of his strong views on
social and industrial questions. He is
not in favor of a minimum wage
scale, but advocates paying the lab-
oring man sufficient wages for a com-
fortable living. He claims that com-
mercial preparedness is as important
to the United -States as military or
naval preparedness.
Doctor Marquis accompanied Mr.
Ford on his peace trip in 1916. His
name for the members of the Peace
party is "God's Fools", but he says he
is proud to have been one of the par-
ty. For nine years, from 1906 to
1915, he was head of the sociological
department of 'Mr. Ford's' organiza-
tion.
Before 1906 he was dean of St.
Paul's Cathedral of Detroit. He is a
graduate of Allegheny college, Mead-
ville, Pa., where he was elected to
Phi Beta Kappa. He holds his D.D.
degree from Cambridge (Mass.) the-
ological school.;
PLAYERS CLUB TO
PRESENT 4 PLAYS
Four one-actt lays will be present-
ed tonight in Sarah Caswell Angell
hall, by members of the Players club.
Members of the Players club and their
guests mayattend these plays. Lack
of theatrical facilities has made it ne-
necessary to limit attendance at these
plays.
The first of the plays to, be presented
is "Catherine Parr" by Maurice Bar-
ing. J. L. Rosecrance '22, plays the
part of King Henry VIII and Eliza-
beth Hamer '22, the part of Catherine
Parr in this act. In "Overintes" by
Alice Gerstenl erg, Mary C. Chandler,
'21, Olga M. Johnson, '21, Mable M.
Stickle, '21, Gladys M. Burch, '21, are
the dramatis personae of this act.
"Supressed Desires" by ,Gorge Cram
and Susan Caspell, is played by Edith
Hellman, '21, John Hassberger, '23,
and Amy Loomis, '22. In the last
play, "Free Speech," written by Wil-
ham Prosser, Norman R. Buchan, '22,
'and Preston H. Scott, '22, play the
leading roles.
PLAN FORMATION OF WILSON
CLUB SIMILAR TO HARVARD

PROF. BA.RTLETT GIVES TALK
BEFORE GRADUATE STUDENTS
Illustrated SlidesUsedin Address on
Ancient Alphabets and
Literature
"Many different alphabets of a
crude nature are being used by the
various East India tribes," said Prof.
Harley H. Bartlett, of the botany de-
partment, in an address delivered be-
fore the Graduate club at 7:890 o'clock
last evening in Natural Science aud-
itorium. "Ancient Alphabets and
Primitive Literature in the East In-
dies" was the subject of the lecture,
and Professor Bartlett developed his
theme by the use of illustrated slides.
"The inhabitants of East India are
not a class of people whom one would
expect to have a high degree of civ-
ilization. Many tribes have risen
from a state of cannibalism. All of
the literature is written in the ancient
alphabets, which vary according to
the tribe," said Professor Bartlett.
Many slides were shown during the
course of the lecture illustrating the
different forms of alphabets.
LARGE NUJBER OF DELEGATES'
ATTEND EPISCOPAL DINNER
Several hundred delegates to the
annual convention of the Michigan
diocese of the Episcopal church were
present at a dinner given in honor of
the fifteenth anniversary of the con-
secration of the Rt. Rev. Charles D.
Williams, D.D., as bishop of Michigan.
Bishop Williams himself was the
principal speaker on the program.
Other speakers were Dr. Harry B.
Hutchins, President Emeritus of the
University, Rev. Samuel S. Marquis,
D.D., rector of St. Joseph church of
Detroit, and Mr. H. E. Van de Walk-
er, of Ypsilanti.'

CORNELL ALUMNI
HOLD CONVENTION,
Cleveland, 0., May 12.-Responding
to the slogan, "Don't just get edu-
cated - keep educated", Cornell uni-
versity alumni will gather here to-
morrow and Saturday in what is said,
to be the first national convention
ever staged by 'alumni of a univer-j
sity away from the seat of the almas
mater.
Tao Ke Sze, minister from China to
the United States and a graduate of
Cornell in the class of 1901, will be'
one of the guests. Other speakers
include Prof. Paul-Shorey, of the Uni-
versity of .Chicago, and Dean J. Par-
k r Hall, *dean of law at the same.
institution. From Ithaca will come
Acting President A. W. Smith and
Romeyn Berry, graduate manager of
Cornell athletics, and from Buffalo,
Judge Cuthbert W. Pound and {. Du-
Pratt White, the leader in Cornell's;
recent work in raising a $9,000,000
endowment.
Alumni from New York, Brooklyn,
Ithaca, Scranton, Pittsburg, Detroit,
Chicago, Buffalo and Cincinnati will
make the trip to Cleveland in special
cars.
Xi Psi Phi Beats Zeta Psi in Ball
By defeating Zeta Psi 9-8 yesterday
Xi Psi Phi won the right to play Phi
Kappa Sigma at 5 o'clock this after-
noon for final honors in the interfra-
ternity baseball race. The medics
beat the fresh lits 4-3, and the sen-
for engineers overcame the soph en-'
gineers in a 14-13 game.
The girls are delighted with my
summer frocks. original designs at
prices within reach of all. The Vogue
Shoppe.-Adv.
Patronize our Advertisers.--Adv.

In the last regular meeting of the
year, last night, at the Union, the
R. 0. T. C. club passed a resolution
petitioning Major Arthur for a change
in the uniform next year. After a
great deal of consideration it was de-
cided' to request a forest green uni-
form, breeches regulation army style,
and cap of non-commissioned officer
style. This'petition will be present-
ed by Major Arthur to the Board of
Regents and if acceptable the pro-
posed uniform willtbe worn next year.
Officers were elected for the dom-
ing year as follows: President, Rob-
ert L. Neale, '22E; vice-president, Paul
A. Smith, '23E; secretary, Thomas W.
Holland, '22; treasurer, George M.
Lott, '22. These new officers will be
installed at the R. 0. T. C. banquet
to be held May 25 at the Union. Tick-
ets can be secured by all the mem-
bers of the local unit at the R. O. T.
C. office.
All members who are contemplating
going to Port Monroe this summer
who can play musical instruments of
any kind are urged to get in touch
with Allen G. McDiarmid, '23, immedi-
ately.
Miss Mary F. Minnis, Chiropodist,
formerly with Mack and Co., will be
at the Saunder's Hair Shop, Tuesday
of every week. Phone 2673-M. for ap-
pointments.-Adv.
The Vogue Shoppe will supply you
with just the right: gown for every
occasion, at reasonable prices.--Adv.
Want anything? If you want what
you want, when you want it, use a
Want Ad in the Michigan Daily.-Adv.

FORC RANGE IN UNIU
Officers for Ensuing Year Ele
Last Regular Meeting
I o fClub

'

Bats
Balls,
SMitts
Gloves

INDOOR BASEBALLS 'Teniis
Let Us Care For Your Athletic Needs Golf
Clubs

MARCUS L. WARD.

Ql Board Vocation Education:
have been requested' to announce that there will be a meeting of
,nd Blade Club, Thursday, May 12, 7:15 p. M., Room 304 Michigan
All Pedefal Board men are urged to attend.
. F. B. WAHR.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE

!
, ;"
x x , '

MAT'S GOING ,ON
THURSDAY
Varsity tennis match with the
ersity of Oklahoma, Ferry field.
Prof. D. C. Munro, of Princeton
ersity, lectures on "Advertising
hie Middle Ages," Natural Sci-
auditorium.
Freshman band practice, Lane
Varsity band meets for concert
he steps of the Library.
Choral Union rehearsal, School
fusic. - '
Sophomore pep meeting for ex-
ation of Spring games rules,
ersity Hall.
First of series of senior sings
ont of Medical buildig.
Glee club rehearsal in Union.
Metng of Zoological Journal
room Z 231, Natural Science
ding..
Round-Up club meeting, Union.
-Production lof Spanish play,
agieta," *,Pattengill auditorium.
Dean S. S. Marquis speaks on
[fare Work" in Natural Sci-
auditorium. under Commerce
auspices.
FRIDAY
Regular meeting of Alpha Nu,
h floor, University hall.
Party under auspices of Michi-
Dames, Barbour gymnasium.
Dance of La Sociedad Hispan.
Packard academy.
-t SESSION OFFICERS
ECTED BY CAMP DAVIS MEN
niering students who are Vlan-
r' attend Camp Davis this sum-
ld a meeting Tuesday night and
officers for the coming Sum-
ssion. Samuel D. Porter, '21E,
talk on life at Camp Davis,
aroll G. McNamee, '21E,. spoke
work of the camp publication,
ck Fly.
ers elected were: Harold D,
'22E, transportation manager;
W. McCordic, '22E, athletic
er; Gordon F. todley, '22'E,
ss manager of the Black Fly;
ilton Goetz, '22E, managing ed-
the publication.
eeting of those planning to at-
w second session of Camp Davis
eld last night,, but due to the
en present. the meeting was

MUNRO WILL IVE-
TA LK HERE TODAY
"Advertising in the Middle Ages"' is
the subject. of a University lecture
which will be presented by Prof.'Dana
Carleton iunro, of the Medieval his-
tory department of Princeton univer-
sity, at 4:15 o'clock this aaernoon in
the Natural Science auditorium. "
Professor Munro is America's fore-
most authority on the Crusades and a
leading historian of the Middle Ages,
according to niembers of 'the faculty.
Prof. Claud H. Van Tyne, of the his-
tory department, who secured the
speaker, states that this lecture is a
popular one designed to appeales-
pecially, to' students outside of the-
history department.
Professor Munro is a graduate of
Brown university and' attended the
universities of Strassburg and Frei-
burg. 'After several years on the fac-
ulty at the University 'of Pennsylva-
nia, he spent 13 years as professor
of European history at the University
of Wisconsin, which post he resigned
in 1915 to accept his present pro-
fessorship at Princeton.
During the participation of the
United States in the World war, Pro-
fessor Muirro acted as research as-
sistant to the committee. on public,
information. He is the , author of,
"German War Practices", a study of
the late war, and several works on
Roman -and medieval history and civ-
ilization.
INSURANCE FIGURES COM-
PiLED' FOR 288 COMPANIES
Cinci'nnati, 0., May 12..- Figures
compiled for the Unique Manual-Di-
gest for 1921 from special reports by
288 insurance companies doing busi-
'ness in the United States, showtotal
insurance in force at the 'close of the
year Dec. 31,, 1920, of $43,319,972,742,
a gain of $6,924,184,460 for the year
1920. Total admitted assets were
$7,632,845,449. Payments to policy
holders for the year of 1920 were
$682,472,013 A half dozen or so
small companies had not sent in a
report but if all the companies' re-
ports were inclu ded, these totals
would not be affec ed over one per
cent.
' Fraternals and assessment compan-
ies are not included, nor is the busi-
ness of the War Risk bureau. The
Unique Manual-Digest believes th
above figures are the first accurate
totals to be announced on the busi,
ness of 1920. -

Phone Orders
Promptly Filled

4I

Mail Orders
Promptly Filled

STORE OPENS 8:30

EST. 1857

STORE CLOSEs 5:30

.r

The

Vogue For

Dotted

Swiss

Pupose Wil iBe
Memorial;
at t2

to Raise Funds for
Movement On -
Colleges

Format-ion of a Woodrow 'Wiilson'
club at Michigan, similar to the'orig-
inal organization at Harvard and the
clubs now formed or in process of or-
ganization at 52 different institutions;
is being considered, according to a
letter posted in University Hall, ask
ing all interested'in such a club to
communicate with 3. Sainbert," 333 Ma-,
jestic building, Detroit.
The first Woodrow Wilson club was
organized at Harvard university on
Nov. 11, 1920; "to perpetuate among
college students the idial's of Presi-
dent Wilson". Since then clubs have
been formed at various universities,
nfd if is the purpose of the movement
to raise a fund of $250,000 or more as
a memorial to Mr. Wilson.;y
In commenting on' the possibility
of q local organization, Registrar Ar-
thur G. Hall said:_"The movement is
very commendable, and a Woodrow
Wilson club at Michigan would 'be
splendid as long as it would not be
an obstructive force. Froma histor-
ical standpoint there are many who
would be interested in -such a club
and "the motives behind its organiza-
tion ." 1
Want anything? If you want what
you want, when you want it, use a
Want Ad in the Michigan Daily.-Adv.
BUS LINE
ADRIAN-TECUMSEH-ArN ARBOR
j Central Standard Time

Warm summery days make one s mind turn to cool sum-
mery dresses. And what can you think of any cooler than
dotted swiss, voile or organdie? The vogue for dotted swiss
is pretty well assured this spring, as well it might be. Its cool
daintiness, its anniversal becomingness and its practicality
make itthe perfect material for summer. Probably the most
popular color combination in this material is navy and white
but you may'choose frocks in red and white, red and navy,
orchid "and white, yellow and white, brown and white and
pink and white. Made in a wide variety of styles, with full
skirts, short sleeves and trimmed in either plain colors or
white, these dainty little frocks are pretty enough for any
occasion. Organdies in dainty light colors as well as brown
or navy are made with full ruffled skirts, short sleeves and
trimmed in many ways. Priced from-$9.75 up.
(SECOND FLOOR) *
Furniture For The Porch

PORCH FURNITURE

Furniture for your porch should be cool -
looking and still practical. If you are look-
ing for this kind of furniture this is the place,
to look. Chairs, rockers, settees, camp chairs
all in. fibre and rattan are here in all styles.
Fibre arm rockers and chairs, high backed,
$8.85.
Chinese cane rockers in assorted styles, $14
each.
Slat back settees in red and green, $3.50,
$4 and $5.
Haffmock reclining chairs, $3.50.

CAMPING OUTFIT
Everything in the way of furniture for
camping trips is here. Gold Medal folding
furniture for -camping is made from the high-
est grade materials - carefully selected and
thoroughly seasoned hard woods, specially pre-
pared steel and canvas duck, made strong in
order that theK may sustain the weights they
are expected to carry. Gold Medal canvas
folding cots, $6.50.

Lv.
Lv.
Lv.
Lv.
Ar.
Lv.
Lv.
TLv.
TLv.
Ar.

NORTH Week
A. m.l
Adrian-Main Corners........7:45
Tecumseh-Main Corners..... 8:25
Clinton-Main Corners......8:45
Saline-Main Corners........ 9:35.
AnnArbor-Main & Huron... .1o: o
SOUTH P.M..
Ann Arbor-Huron R 4th Ave. 4:35
Saline-Main Corners......
Clinton-Miain Corners....... 6:00
Tecumseh-Main Corners.6:2o
Adrian-Main Corners.......7:oo

Sun-
day
P.M.
4 :oo
4:40
5:05
5:50
P.M.
7:35
8:45 I
9:25

Gold Medal folding camp chairs, $5.
Gold Medal camping stove outfits, $10.

(THIRD FLOOR)

'Ur

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