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May 12, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-12

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i

W L.H 1 i .
1ABLY RAIN
TODAY

ril~rk

Daii ttj

PAY AND)

w M f

I

No. 154.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TRURSDAY, MAY 12, 1921.

PRICE

ECORD

ELECTION BALLOT

POLL

a*

----I i

ESPITE POSSIBLE
kRMISTICE, POLES
A FRENCH FIGHT

ARTILLERY DUEL RESULTS
SEVERUL SLIGHTLY IN.
JURED

IN

BOTH SIDES AGREE
TRUCE; NEITHER

TO
ACTS

Consul-General Deela-es Poles Want
Bigger Share in Ruling of
Upper Silesa*
(By Associated Press)
Oppeln, Silesia, May 11.-French
troops engaged in an artillery duel
with' insurgent Poles near Grosho-
witz, abut six miles south of this city,
yesterday.
The Poles replied to the French
fire with several small field pieces.
A number of slightly wounded
French soldiers have been brought
here and other wounded Frenchmen
have been brought in by motor lorries
from other towns in the disturbed
area.
rppeln, May 11. - Fighting is con-
tinuing in Ratidor, Kofel and Rosen-
burg, despite the fact that Adelberg
Korsanti, leader of the, inurgent
Poles, has agreed that then Polish
ces will "observe an armistice dur-
ng conversation" looking to a set
tlement of the trouble in upper Si-
lesia. "-
Daniel Kresryski, the Polish -con-
sul-general here, said today that Pol-
ish forces probably had not heard of
Korsanti's agreement owing to faulty
communication, and would cease fight-
ing when they do hear of it. Asked
what he expected would result from
the "conversation" Kresryski said:
"It is uncertain just what demands
will be made, but the Poles certainly
will insist on a bigger share in ad-
ministration of upper Silesia than
they have had heretofore. They do
not want the inter-Allied commission
done away with, but they want more
recognition from , the commission.
They have only had crumbs from the
rich man's table so far."
Kresryski declared the Poles fear-
ed a German offensive, believing that
if the Germans get the upper hand,
"there will be no Poles left alive
down here". This fear Kresryski as-
serted had lately increased due to the
actions of the inter-Allied, cointnis-
sion- in giving arms to civilian Ger-
man olice
J71cjtanirs, '21,Afnd
Robe rtsofl'jg To
Head Wolverine
John E. McManis, '21, has been ap-
pointed managing editor of The Wol-
verine, the Summer session newspa-
per of the University, for next sum-
mer, and Nathan W. Robertson, '23,
has been, appointed business manager.
According to an act passed by the
Board in Control of Student Publi-
cations two years ago, the editor and
business manager of The Wolverine
are appointed by the editor and busi-
ness manager elect of The Daily. This
system was instituted in order to es-
tablish the connection of The Daily
with The Wolverine and to place the
responsibility for publishing both pa-
pers under one head.
SENIORS WILL GIVE PARTY
IN BARBOUR GYM SATURDAY
Senior lit students will hold an in-
formal dance from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock
Saturday afternoon in- Barbour gym-
nasium. Music will be furnished by
George E. Rogers' five-piece orches-
tra, and light refreshmets' will be
served. The dance is free to all ten-
for lits who have paid their class
dues. Those who have not yet paid
may settle the account at the door of
the gymnasium Saturday afternoon. A
careful- check is to be made in order

INITIAL '21 SING
SET FOR TONIGHT
Accompanied by the Varsity band
and wearing caps and gowns in ac-
cordance with the established cus-
tom, members of the class of '21 will
hold their first senior sing at 7
o'clock tonight in front of the Li-
brary. The seniors will sing Michi-
gan songs, such as "The Yellow and
Blue" and "The Victors", while the]
band will furnish additional numbers.
Similar sings are being planned each
week until the beginning of examina-
tions in June.
"These sings once occupied an im-
portant place in campus events, but of]
recent years interest in them has]
been waning," said Robert E. Mc-
Kean, '21, chairman of the commit-
tee in charge of the sings, yesterday.
"It is our purpose to reinstate this
tradition *and to have the sings be-
come as popular ,as in former years.,
By combining with the Varsity band,
a good program is assured the sen-
iors."
. A
Ma I, f
TUE O f 7 TO 6
Schultz Stars for Varsity; No Runs
Made in 10th; Fast Play in ,
11th Soores Victory
ELEVEN INNINGS NEEDED TO
SETTLE ECCENTRIC GAME!
(ByW. S. Fibtt
Staff Correspondent
East Lansing, May 11. - With Dick
Schultz playing the role of hero,
Michigan defeated M. A. C. 7-6 here
today in 11 innings of eccentric base-
ball.
Michigan had rounded up a lead of
three runs on a combination of six
hits and six errors by the farmers,
getting two each in the second, fifth
and ninth, when the Aggies' sluggers
lit nTercilessly into Ed. Ruzika,
whose wildness had previously allow-
ed them a trio of counters.
The first green and white hitter at
bat in the ninth singled to center, the
second followed and scored him with
a beautiful triple. A clean double
spelled two runs and the bench for
Big Ed. Schultz went in in his place
and fanned the next two batters, then
Uteritz made Michigan's only error
and allowed Brown to cross the plate
with the tying run. The third out fol-
lowed with a pop fly to Uteritz.
No runs were made in the tenth.
Genebach, first man up in 'the elev-
enth,fanned and Vick grounded out.
Schultz let four bad ones go by and
took first. Uteritz followed suit. As
Van Boven swung at the ball Schultz,
who had stolen second, started with
a rush and crossed the Aggies' in-
field by rounding third at full speed.
The Farmers' first sacker had been
pulled off the bag by a poor throw
and pegged to the home plate too late
to catch Schultz, who slid safely
home with the run that won the
game.
Score by Innings
Michigan ....0 20 02000 201-7 61
M. A. C.....10000200300-6116
Batteries-Kuhn and Oas for the
Aggies; Ruzicka, Schultz, and Vick
for Michigan.
rlinisters Hold
88th Convention
, ,t

Episcopal ministers from about 100
churches gathered in Ann Arbor yes-
terday for the eighty-eighth annual
convention of the Michigan .a diocese.
Bishop Charles D. Williams of De-
troit opened the services with holy
communion.
President Emeritus Harry B. Hutch-
ins and Dr. S. S. Marquis, rector of
St. Paul's church and former head of
the sociological department of the
Ford Motor company, Detroit, spoke
yesterday noon at a banquet in' the
Union in cerebration of the fifteenth
anniversary of *Bishop Williams' con-
secration.
Women of the diocese are holding
a conference here, independent of

23 FIGHT WILL B
EXCITEDTONIGHT
Officials needed to Act In Games;
Personnel of Soph Teams
Compiled
RULES WILL BE EXPLAINED
AT SOPHOMOR MEETING
Enthusiasm among members of the
sophomore class in preparation for
the Spring games will reach its
heighth at the sophomore pep meeting
which will be held at 7 o'clock tonight
in University Hall. Dwight P. Joyce,
'21, will address the sophomores, ex-
plaining in detail the rules of the
games, as well as giving several tips
on how to secure advantage over the
younger class. Paul G. Goebel, '23E,
sophomore captain, will give a short
talk. The president of the sophomore
lit class, Vernon Hillery, and the pres-
ident of the sophomore engineer class,
Edward Johns; will also address the
sophomores. '
Officials Needed
Below is announced the personnel
of the heavyweight and middleweight
sophomore teams. The lightweight
'23 team and all t'he freshmen teams
will be announced in tomorrow's Daily
in connection with the rules of the
Spring games.
Hugh E. Wilson, '22, requests that
all "M" men who can possibly do so
report to act as officials for the Spring
games at 3:30 o'clock Friday afternoon
at the tug-of-war grounds and at 9:30
o'clock Saturday morning at Ferry
field. .
Soph Leavy Team Listed.
The sophomore heavyweight team
is composed of:
C. M. Sage, H. Taylor, H. DeRuiter,
W. Fiske, E. Robinson, C. Pedro, P.
Cotton, V. Me4hod. C. Meeker, E. Johns,
C. Salmier, H. Spurrer, S. Chirds, C.
Eli, H. Byrne, H. Martin, H. E. Mc-
Knight,RW. E. Ludwig, I. Brown, V.
Halett, R. S. Clifford, F. G. Buell, W.
J. Rise, W. H. Christenson, W. G.
Guthrie, H. B. Parritt, J. E. Lewelign,
W. Crawford, M. Swartz, C. Myer, E.-
Chapman, H. Friedman, F. Cappon, H.
Dunphy, W. J. Van Orden, D. Krien-
heder, E. Haug, G, Tramp, R. Row-
land, E. Hunt, C. Richards, W. Lahde,
W. Piper,. H. Selligman, R. Chonat, R.
Chamberlain, J. Mulford, H. McGulli-
day, J. Hills, J. Sutton, E. Larson.
Those who will pull for the sopho-
more middleweight team are:
M. Bouney, G. Bonfield, J. Brown, J.
Prilman, E. Darling, H. Stedman, H.
Hall, D. Allen, C. Piskens, H. Hasteller,
D. Preston, C. Foster, R. Reason, V.
Nagle, R. Vasper, P. Spears, A. Hoyt,
J. Barry, C. Greenway, W. Causk, H.
Rouse, C. Bennize. 0. Holt, C. Gries-
,ley, G. Crawlson, V. Marsh, C. Berry, L.
Mack, D. Watts, K. Anderson, G. Wal-
top, J. J. Hammel, P. Wendel, O. E.
Tilley, B. Heath, J. Taylor, A. Parker,]
S. Post, B. Gray, J. Cross, J. Vlack, N.
Lavanway E. Gleason, E. Pedlis, L.
Snell, L. Lynch, B. Rankin, M. Rhodes,
W. Swartz.
LA SOCIE DD KSPANICA
PRESENTSPLAY TONIGT
PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM SCENE
OF SPANISH COMEDY
PRODUCTION
"Zaragueta", a comedy written by

Miguel Carrion and Vital Aza, 'famous
Spanish playwrites of the nineteenth
century, will be presented by mem-X
bers of La Sociedad Hispanica at 8'

WOMEN SEE PLANS
TOR NEW BUILDING
Sketches amn blue-prints of Mich-
gan's prospective Women's building
were presented by Mrs. Katherine
Puncheon Pomroy, '96, president of
the Michigan Alumnae association, at
a meeting of the Women's league and
town women yesterday afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall. In a short
speech upon the coming campaign for
funds, Mrs. Pomeroy explained that
the building plans, drawn by Pond
and Pond, architects of the Union,
were largely tentative in nature.
"The plans cannot be more definite,"
she stated, "until the exact site of the
building is known, and that will not
be until $50,000 of the $1,000,000 fund
has been raised. At that time the Re-
gents have promised to give us a site,
but they have not said where it will
be. Another reason for having the
blue-prints merely tentative is that
they may be changed with ease until
they meet with general approval."'
Following Mrs. Pomeroy's talk, each
officer of the Women's league gave a
brief report of the work of her de-
partment during the past year. Thenl
the new officers were installed by,
means -of an impressive ceremonial,
and Edna Groff, '22, president, made a
short inaugural address. Marguerite
Clark, '21, retiring president, was
mistress of ceremonies.s
S ENATE APPROVES
EMERGENCY TAIFFt
Measure Passed by 63-28 Vote After
Leinglhy Opposition From E
Democrats3
BILL DIFFERS RADICALLY
FROM ONE PASSED BYHOUSE
(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 11.-The senate]
today passed the emergency tariff bill,
rejecting all late amendments. The
vote was 63 to 28. Seven Democrats
voted with the Republicans while one'
Republican, Senator Moses, New
Hampshire, voted against the bill.3
As passed by the senate the meas-
ure differs radically from the form in1
which it was passed by the house,
early in the extra session, &nd now
goes to conference. ' Only the tariff
features of the bill were kept intact.
Action by the senate came after the
end of five hours of attack by Demo-
crat leaders. The latter, however,'
were not alone, in their attack on the
measure, for several Republicans
made efforts to broaden the scope only
to see their amendments meet the
same fate as those offered by minor-]
ity.
A passed by the senate the bill is
to be effective for six months in which
time it is hoped the permanent tariff
law, now being framed by the house
ways and means committee, will have
been enacted into law. It provides
rates of duty on wheat, corn, beans,
peanuts, potatoes, rice, cattle, sheep,
meats, raw staple cotton and cotton
manufactures, wool and wool manu-
factures, sugar, milk, wrapper and
filler tobacco and other farm pro-
ducts. In addition to the tariff provis-
ions the bill carries an anti-dumping
section designed to check the influx
of cheaply manufactured foreign
goods.

SENIORS URGED TQ OBSERVE
CLASS CUSTOMS BY COUNCIL
The Student council at its regular
meeting"last evening passed a reso-
lution strongly urging that all sen-
iors participate in their class activi-
ties and traditions.
Among those mentioned are espe-
cially the wearing of the cap and
gown on Mondays and Thursdays and
on such other occasions as senior
sings each Thursday evening and on
Cap night. Canes should be carried
on afternoons when not attending
classes, to baseball games and other
similar events, and on Sunday. These
traditions are a part of Michigan and
should be observed in the-opinion of
the councilmen.

T l ECNT ITPESIDENlCY OF UNION; BOETZ
HEAD0 COUNCIL; -OVER 3,4010

LEE GETS SECRETARYSHIP OF UNION; COOPER,,.
MOORE, PAUL MOORE, AND DEEBACH TO
ION VICE-PRESIDENTS

0

FIRST COUNT SHOWS DIFFERENCE OF 15 VOTE:
BETWEEN FOUR CANDIDATES FOR UNION H
Gower and E. E. Moore Chosen Councilmen-at-Large; Hitchcock Will
S. C. A.; Close Races Feature Elections for Council and
Student Advisory Committee
The largest student vote in the history of the University was i
yesterday in the All.campus election, more than 3,400 ballots being
representing an increase of 200 over last year. The presidency of
Union was so closely contested between four candidates that two rec
were necessary after the first totals were obtained. On the first c
there was a difference of but 15 votes between four candidates, whi
the second count one man had a margin of only 6 votes over the ru
up. The third recount was started at 2 o'clock this morning when
ally went to press. The final results will be announced on the bu
board of the Union this morning.
Angus G. Goetz, '22M, was elected president of the Student council
vote totaling 2,270 to 832 for Renaud Sherwood, '22.- Frank H. Lee
,2t, won the recording secretaryship of the Union, with a total of
votes. His opponents were George Reindel Jr., '22, who received 947
Robert F. Barie Jr., '22, who polled 574. -
Robert J. Cooper, '22, was elected literary vice-president of the 1
with 612 votes, the other candidates, Guy R. Moulthrop, '22, and Jo
A. Bernstein, '22, receiving 404 and 324, respectively. Engineering stun

WILLSON, E
BE UN.

elected E. F. Moore, '22E, their Union
George 'E .Gregory, ''22E, received
288, and Edmund H. Fox, '22E, 283.
Paul M. Moore Jr., '22M, was elect-
ed medic vice-president of the Union,
with 111 votes to 89 for Eugene R.
Elzinga, '22M. Laws elected Harry
,C. Willson, '22L, who was given - a
vote of 106. Henry A. McCown,;
'22L, and Richey B. Reabill, '22L, re-
ceived. 76 and 70, respectively.
The comlined departments chose
Robert F. Deeljach, '23D, their Union'
vice-president, giving him a vote of
92. Robert M. Winslow, '23D, Donald
C. Culver, '22P, and J. Meads, other
candidates, received 81, 33, and 37
votes respectively.
Hugh W. Hitchcock, '22, George 0.
Brophy, '22L;' and Renaud Sherwood,
'22, - were elected student members of
the Board in Control of Student Pub-
lications. Their vote was 1,170, 1,083,
and 947, respecively. C. Maurice At-
kinson, '22, received 898, Thougas I.
Underwood, '23L, 830, John M. Wint-
ers, '23L, 712, Robert L. Drake, '21,
637, Dewey F. Fagerburg, '22L, 577,
S. T, Beach, 435.
Members of the Board in Control of
Athletics were elected " as follows:
Angus G. Goetz, '22M, 1,964, Alfred L-.
May, '22E, 1,194, and George O.
Brophy, '22L, 1,155. Other candidates
were Edmund H. Pox, '22E, with a
vote, qf 888, Harold E. Storz, '22L, with
805, and Dewey F. Fagerburg, '22L,
with 602.

vice-president, giving him M0
~ ~- ~--- .

Student council, and H. A. Beam,
Dents gave W. M. Brown, 48, an(
W. Wilson, 44. Pharmics gave
VonEwegan, 13, and P. Faulkner
Medics gave R. O. Rychener, 97,
R. B. Fast, 70. Homoeops gave
F. Lutz, 13, and Dayton Pulford,
Junior engineers gave George W.
Cordic, 199, Eugene O. Harbeck,
Milton A. Goetz, 126, and Arthur
:Stauffer, 121., No figures were ai
able for the sophomore engineerE
the junior 'laws.
Council Ballots Thrown Out
All ballots for the junior lits
sophomore lits for Student cou
were thrown out because the inst
tions on the ballot were wrong
the former case the instructions s
ed that four -instead of three sh(
be voted for, while in the latter
instructions ,called for a vote,
three instead of for two. Spe
class elections will be held to de
the councilmen from these classe
Hugh W. Hitchcock,.'22, was 1
ing his opponent, Leon W. Gruba
'22, by a wide margin for presi
of the Student Christian assocla
on the face of incomplete rett
The former's vote was 1,33 and
latter's 893. Incomplete returns
vice-presidents of the asgocia
showed the following figures;. 1
tist, Gale L. Wessinger, 95, and A
C. Anderson, 64; Congregational,
P. Campbell, 257, and A. E. Pierp
94; Disciple, Mlaurice W. Taylor
and William T. Ogden, 17; Epi
pal, Frank H. Lee Jr., 205, and TI
as l. Dewey, 162;, Lutheran, L
and F. Meilander, 92, and Louis
Dyll, 49; Methodist, E. T. Rams
344, A. Ross, Fox, 177; Prerb
ran, Philip P. Elliott, 313, and Ar
F. Hale, 107.
Gregory Wil Head Society
George E. Gregory was elected I
ident of the Engineering society
a vote of 321. His opponents, K
Campbell and A. D. Stauffer rece
225 and 198 votes respectively.
vice-presidency went to George
McCordic with 430 votes to 270
H. H. Haight. Paul G. Goebel
elected secretary of the society
vote of 612 over R. P. Everett whc
ceived 142. Thomas J. Lynch
elected treasurer, his vote being
His opponent was G. A. Heath,
received 332 votes.
Junior engineers selected Pat
Ackerman for the honor committe
giving him a vote of 154. His op
ent, Edgar S. Bradley, received
Sophomore engineers elected Ric
Rowland for the committee, his
being 165 to 63 for Edward Hau
Jnulor architects elected J
Rindge to the Honor comm4tee, g
him a vote of 21. F. J. Morse
opponet. received 14.

Gower Wins
For Student councilman-at-large,.
W. W. Gower, '23, was high man with
990 votes. E. F. Moore, '22E, was
second with 944. 'These men will be
the elections of the campus-at-large.
Other candidates were Roland Li-
bonati, '22, with 795, Stanley Kresge,
'23, 723, L. Perkins Bull, '23, with
612, W. V. Gilbert, '22E, with 590, and
Clarence Hatch, '22, with 523.'
Advisory Committee Returns
Junior representatives on the Stu-
dent Advisory committee will be C.
Maurice Atkinson, '22, and Thomas I.
Underwood, '23L, the former rec'eiv-
ing 1,290 votes and the latter 1,106.
Votes given to other candidates were
O. W. Rush, '22, with 1,036, and Wal-
ter Simomns, '22E, 891.
' Sophomore representatives on the
Student Advisory committee were
elected as follows: Paul Goebel, '23E,
with 1,797 votes and Irwin Uteritz, '23,
1,293. Other candidates were John
Bacon, '23, with 668 votes and By-
ron Darnton, '23, with 487.
Vote Not Complete
the vote had not been completely
taken on candidates for the Student
council from the various departments
at an early hour this morning, but
latest reports are given below.
Slater and Brown to Council
Architects gave F. S. Slater, 29, for

o'clock tonight in Pattengill audi-,
torium.
Norman Willey, instructor in Span-
ish, who is directing the production,
states that the humor of the play is
so evident that a knowledge of the
Spanish language is not necessary
for real appreciation. The fine work
on the part of the characters, at the
many rehearsals, assures those in
charge of a. successful production.
The ticket committee has placed
tickets for sale to the general public
in Graham's bookstore on State'street,
the price being 50 cents.

- tw.

not i i

s' gathering. The conven-1
concluded today.

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