100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 11, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A

llf,;HlLiAN

IEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
morning except Monday during the UniveT-
ard in Control of Student Publications.
R OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
l Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
er and the local news published therein.
postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
carrier or mail, $3.50.
Arbor Press building, Maynard Street.
ess. 96o; lEditorial, 2414"
not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
ily to appear in p int, but as an evidence of
f events will be published in The Daily at the
ditor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
ations will receive no consideration. No man-
rned unless the writer inclctses postage.'
* not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
unications.
On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock

3I18

IORIAL STAFF
lephone 2414

GING EDITOR . .....- .. GEORGE O. BROPHY JU.
w' r ......a...Chesser M. Campbell
tniriilBoard........Lee Woodruff
EditorsAW H. . Hitchcock ,
T, H. JAEdamJ .McMani
kena a herwoad T. W. Sargent, Jr.
Edito . - .............J.a ' ' A; . Bernstein
ditor.......... .... . P. Capbel
sdr Y. -, "eaSo. e ac
ials...... . F J.' Whinery, Le.A. en .'.iec
.*,, .*,w.. ... .. Robert Angell
' --i ---, ------. ----.-. .... Mary D. Lane
--.-.-.-.-.--.-.--.Thbmas Dewey
ive Wald PrankB H.McPike Sidney B. Coates
i.eber J. A. Bacon C. T. Penoyer
.cW Ottaway Marion B. Stahl
alWt Twel S. Kerr
j# Grt y Bron arntosl Marion Koch
a brhltzer -w. A Kaver Dorothy Whipple
S. Adair Water Donely Geald P. Overton
e F. Eliott Beata Hsleyt ydward Lambrecht
~p ~~in Kathrine MontgomeryS aa Wlett
ng in H. E. Howlett
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
ESS MANAGE1R........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
iing , ..... . - D. P Toyce
lG $ i ° Y . .. ,.... . Kunstadter
iton ............ ........... ath
1.'6t s .. . . . . . . . . . . . E. R. Prieh
iotI ... -....-.- - --............. ......v . F. HilIery
- Assistants
.LanbrechtM. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
Hantel, jr N. W" Robertson M. S. Goldring
. Hau inson Thos. L Rice H. W. Heidbreder
. Cross R. G. Burchell W. Cooley
L. Davis A. J. Parker
rons -wishifng to scure information concerning news for any
Dj The" aily should se the night editor, who has full charg"
sewa tobe pitedtatnight.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 11, 1921.
Nigt Editor-T. W. SARGENT, .R.
s club will meet at 4 o'clock today.
WHO WON'T VOTE
actically everybody in the University will cross
impus today between 8:45 and 3 o'clock. Some
fail to vote. Among the number will be:
ose who think Michigan spirit is foolishness,
unto themselves, And take their education like
my pills for so many dollars.
ose who are frankly "disgusted" with campus
ons, believing them to be the happy hunting
id for that mythical being, tie "campus poli-
", and failing to recognize the fact that i
a being ever gets control it will be because of
.uch laxity as their own.
ose who are ,too lazy.
e last class is the largest, btu the others have
"piping up" frequently. No real Michigan
or woman cqres t8 be numbered with any of
iree ; but ineitably some of us vill be unless
lake it a genmine duty of the day to put our
into action'and line up our ballot behind the
len - the men who have proved by experi-
their ability to carry on the activities of Michi-
next year.
THAT THEATgR IDEA
e have all heard dozens of plans for the es-
hment of a Campu theater in the past few
. The trouble with all of the propositions has
that they do not get anywhere. Now the
a, which has a habit of getting things accom-
d, steps in with a Plan of its own for the es-
hment of a little theater which will be in use
resent plans can be carried out) in the near
e.This new ideaconflicts in no way with the
e possibilities of a Campus theater.
e idea now under consideration contemplates
onstruction of a stage at the southern end of
d Union building. The stage will be almost as
as that at the Whitney, with dressing rooms
-neath. The seating capacity is estimated at
three, hundred. Short skits and playlets
m and acted by Michigan men under profes-
l direction will be given as often as meritori-
nanuscripts and the demands of -the student
will permit.
dream of a perfect 'gem of architecture is
mplated. The interior arrangement will re-
much as it is now It will simply be an ex-
>n of Union facilities to accommodate those
have some talent for playwriting or acting to
ise that talent under the best direction possi-
Undoubtedly it §hould result in more and bet-

ay production here at Michigan. It is a step
e right, direction toward the fulfillment of aa
felt need. Incidentally it will doubtless result
more numerous submission of manuscripts
which the annual Michigan Union Opera is
n.
"RAZZING" THE PLAYERS AGAIN
seball is a game played on nerves, and de-
nt tq a considerable extent on individual plays
>sychology. Unlike the pigskin chaser, the
>n the diamond is under the kind of a~ strain
.if he Iis affected by nt' v r 'c$ mn-%7 T~46n r

about a "break' which will lose his play and ulti-
mately the contest.
It therefore behooves each and every rooter to
give the baseball man more than his just due, not
only in the interest of better sportsmanship, but also
in the hope that Michigan may thereby be enabled
always to win. Certainly any form of "razzing", if
indulged in, will do more than almost anything else
to make us unsuccessful on the diamond.
Open condemnation of a player is not only apt
to be disastrous but is entirely opposed to the spirit
of Michigan. Let's boost at games. But, if we
don't feel like boosting, let's keep silent or at most
vouchsafe a "hard luck, old man!" Razzing the
home players is un-Michigan; let's remember it.
BRYAN BLASTS DARWIN
William Jennings Bryan once more comes to the
front in a stirring emotional address accusing Dar-
winsm of being responsible for everything from
the undermining of the Christian faith to the en-
tire responsibility for the world war. But stranger
than this resurrection of an outworn orthodoxy are
the proofs which the commoner offers.
In otne instance he quotes briefly from Huxley
to prove that the theory of evolution is idiotic. Yet
almost every civilized man knows that Huxley was
one of the most famous protagonists of evolution.
Because of the fact that Darwin was great enough
to see that there were a great many steps lacking
in the exhaustive investigations that he made,
Bryan asserts that "there is more science in the
twenty-fourth verse of the first chapter of Gene-
sis (And God said, let the ea'rth bring forth the
living 'creature after his kind, cattle and creeping
things, and the beasts of the earth after his kind;
and it was s) than in all that Darwin wrote".
Certainly it cannot be said of Darwin that his facts
are as unsupported as those of Bryan's.
Another very conclusive proof that is offered to
combat the "Menace of Darwinism" is the quot-
ing of a very beautiful and inspiring hymn that
throbs with life. Unfortunately a hymn, however
beautiful, actually proves nothing. If one can re-
fute evolution with a hymn - why not a mathe-
matics problem. One might go on indefinitely
bringing to light the many unscientific and wholly
erroneous conclusions that the silver-tongued ora-
tor has drawn in his indictment of Darwinism and
the theory of evolution, but that is unnecessary.
This stirring defense of a subject relegated to the
scrap-heap two decades ago, may be classed along
with "Free Silver" and other far sighted policies
advocated by Mr. Bryan.
If, as Mr. Bryan states, it is impossible to recon-
cile Christianity with Darwinism, it certainly would
be a dark outlook for religion; but Mr. Bryan fails
to recognize the fact that evolution may also take
place in religious beliefs.
Apropos of "Women in Politics" we clip the
following:
Red Spring, N. C., May o. - Mrs. Beatrice
Bullock, candidate for alderman in the town elec-
tion yesterday, defeated her husband, G. T. Bul
lock, who was candidate on the opposition ticket
by a majority of four votes.
Yell a hearty "Get off the grass'!" to the student
who shortcuts.
r-
~ The Telescope
The Sure Sign
Returning robins,
Blossoming lilacs,
Budding trees,
Freshman pots,
Plaid skirts,
Absent minds,
Strawberry shortcakes,
To all these acceptable signs of spring may the
skeptic
Refuse to give credence;
But when the explosive, irregular pht-pt-pht of
of the

One lung lawn mower is heard
On the campus outside of the class room,
Then who can doubt that spring is really with us?
Prohibition is a good thing. It has already sharp-
ened our aesthetic appetites, for whereas we used
to consider the dandelion a common ugly weed,
now we realize it to be a most beautiful golden
flower of great possibilities.
Quoth Eppie Taff:
Here lies Reformer Horner,
For him grace is beseeched,
He died from trying all his might
To practice what he preached.
"Have you the time?"
"Yes, but not the inclination."
The latest trans-continental air flier is equip-
ped with berths as well as the most modern of bath-
ing facilities. That's all very accommodating, but
we'd certainly hate to see an accident at the wrong
time.
"He barked in his sleep last night."
"Hydrophobia?"
"No, hot dogs."
Famous Closing Ines
"Tying her first beau," said the neighbors as the
old maid dragged her victim to the altar.
ERM,

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2..1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(EasterntStandard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. n, and dourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. m. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. in. Ex.
presses at 9: I8 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a-m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. in. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7 : 0.m., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 MAY 1921
S :M T WV T F S.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 i 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 24 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
PANAMAS
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas., etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.
WHEN TOM'S AROUND
When I'm around to see you
With my literature at night,
If you'll buy a copy
It'll fill my heart with delight.
Then I'll do some business
If you'll only say:
"Dr., I have some good old shoes
You may take away."t
Dr. Town. Lovell.
'"LEANERS
P RESSES.
2OW C. msesOMN
Wone6ZS.
Ladies Party owns a Specialty

...

Electric Fans for
the warm days to come--

A'NNUA'L BOOK SAL

-.AT- .

G RA HAM'-S
BOTH. ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
Open Evening During Sale

v

Telephone 273

Washtenaw
shop

Electric

200 E ast Washiungton Street jJ

The TurksCi

af

We go 6000 miles for the
Turkish tobacco
used in Murad-Why?
Because-Turkish has a taste--Turkish has a
uildness--Turkish hasa delight-far beyond all
cigarette tobaccos of all other lands-
Murad gives you real enjoyment, and true
delight such as no Tobacco other than 100% Pure
Turkish Tobacco can give.
Facts-Facts-FACTS-!

200

Tens of thousands of smokers
-tens of thousands of times-
have PROVEN this -
"Judge for Yourself-!"

t

AO

T _ ,.

I.

I,

=---

' 9

u.ro~e

TAILO_MAT FASHION PARK
A FASHION PARK STTLE TR ATMENT
WHICH ASSURES SOFT DRAPING
AND LAST.NG 21APELINESS

322-324 South Main Street

<< Y ,

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan