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May 10, 1921 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-10

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PE TEM.I
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D~AY AND
0 QE

152 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 10, 1921. PRICE

GERMAN PARTIESf
'NO' ON INDEMNITY
MAJORITY FAVORABLE TOWARD
ACCEPTING ALLIED ULTI-
MATUM
NEW COALITION BODY'
EXPECTED WITHIN DAY
Body Probably Will be Submissive to
Demands of the Supreme
Council
Berlin, May 9.--The majority Soc-
ialists and clericals in party confer-
ence today voted in favor of accept-
ing the ultimatium of the Allies, while.
the German peoples party, by ,a vote
of 69 to 5, rejected the proposition.
The Democrats were in session at
midnight.
As the independent Socialists have
already favored yielding to the Allies,
it is believed there will be a sufficient
majority in the'Reichstag for accept-
ance of the ultimatum.
Paul Loebe, of the majority Social-
;sts and president of the Reichstag
will be commissioned by President
Ebert with the task of forming a new,

RECORDS OF ELECTION
CANDIDATES

UNDERCLASS INTEREST, CENTERS
ON SPRING GAMES NEXT SATURDAY

'Annual '2212 Step CAM P05.10
IPlans Completedl l 96N

Berlin, May '9.-Sentiment in Ger-
r an political circles was showing a
drift at noon today in favor of agree-
ing to' the Allied reparation terms.
It is now believed a parliamentap
coalition which will accept the Allied
ultimatum will be constituted within
the.next 24 hours.
Germany has until midnight May 12
to consider the Allied terms. By the
expiration of this time, she\ is requir-
ed to give a categorical answer,-
yes or no,-whether she will accept
these terms.
Failure to accept, the Allied ultima-
tum stipulates, will be followed by Al-
lied occupation of the industrial re-
gion of the Ruhr valley, for which
Allied military preparations are now
in progress.
The terms the Germans are asked
to accept include, as the main feature,
the payment of . 135,000,000,000 gold
marks in reparations to the Allies, or
approximately' $33,750,000,000,
Meanwhile the German cabinet of
Cancellor Fehrenbach, with Dr. Wal
ter Simons as foreign minister has re-
signed holding over temporarily pend-
ing the formation of a new ministry.
GIRLS GLEE CLUB
CONCERT TONIGHT'
The University Girls' Glee club will
present an interesting program, in
which 90 girls will participate at 8
o'clock tonight in Hill auditorium.
The Glee club will be assisted by the
Mandolin club, a violinist, and two
accompanists.
The following program/will be pre-
saited:
Varsity .............Earl V. Moore
Glee and Mandolin clubs
The Miller's Wooing..Fanning-Spicker
Glee club
MViolin solo
Concerto -in A major........Mozart
Josephine Connabal, '23
Scene in College Life
Glee and Mandolin clubs
The Melodious Foursome
Elegy..... ............Massenet
Dinah ....... ..Clayton Jones
Bernice Nickels, '21, Harriet Gustin,
'22, Mary Lohrstorfer, '21,
Carrie Fairchild, '21
Fly, Singing Bird, Fly... ..
..............Edward Elgar
Violin obligato by Neva Nelson, '21
Swing Along .........Will Cook
Glee club
Lotus Girl ......'.... .Robert James
Michigan Trills .......Murza Mann
Murza Mann, '22
Enchantment ......Ernest Alberti
Mandolin club
Melodies lpy Michigan Maids'
Florence Herrick, '23, and
Marie Meyer, '23
Songs'
The Star ........... .....Rogers
Springs Singing .......Mac Fayden
Mildred Chase, '22
Wynken, Blynken, and Nod ......
............... Ethelbert Nevin
" Glee club

Several candidates for offices
at the All-campus elections fail-
ed to have their records appear
in the Sunda Supplement, and
handed in the material yester-
day.
Edward F. Moore, '22E, candi-
date for Student councilman-at-
large was in the Union opera (2)
(3); Tu Beta Pi; Mimes; chair-
man costumes' Union musical,
production (3); class social
committees; treasurer Cercle
Francais (4); chairman proper-
ties French play (2) (3); French
play (1) (4); upperclass advis-
er committeemen (4).
R. A. Bailby, Jr., '22, candi-
date for the Student council
from the junior lit class, was
assistant Varsity track manag-
er; stage committee Union opera
1921.
Robert J. Cooper, '22, cand-
date for Union vice-preiden!
from literary college, was on the
Chimes business staff, 1919-1920;
property committee, Minstrelsy;
reception committee Unin, .1920. '
I I
TO INSPECT MEN'S
ROOMING HOUSES1
In Order to Standardize Living Con-
ditons Rooms Used Must Be
Approved
CONTRACTS EXPECTED TO
ELIMINATE CONTROVERSIES
Startifig next fall all men living in
rooming houses will be expected to
talte rooms approved by a committee
of five women wh ch has already start-
ed an inspection of all rooming hous-
es, according to an announcemnt made
yesterday afternoon by J. A. Bursley,
Dean 9f Students.
Will Stop Overcrwding
"The plan will be the same as that
now used for league houses," said
Dean Bursley. "The reason for the
appointment of the committee is to
bring about more standardized condi-
tions in the houses. The committee
will see that the sanitary conditions
are as they should be and prevent
over-crowding. It will make no at-
tempt to set prices and will not in-
spect the, houses with the idea of crit-
icising, _but only to make up a list of
residences which have met with their
approval."
Must Observe Contract
In order to further eliminate trouble
between roomers and landladies Dean
Bursley is preparing leases which the
University will recommend for use. If
an agreement is signed between a
roomer and landlady the University
will see that each party lives up to
the contract. In this way much of
the trouble and moving from one
house to another experienced this year
[is expected to be done away with. It
will not be a rule that a contract
must be signed, but if there is no
agreement all controversies must be
settled between th'e landlady and the
roomer and not by the University.
The committee appointed is as fol-
lows: Mrs. Emma Yerex, Mrs. M.
Hickman, Mrs. F. M. Haun, Mrs. H.
Flool; and Mrs. A. I Reamer. All are
members of the University Housing
league for men. They will report the
results of their tour to Dean Burs-

ley, who will then make up a list of
the, approved houses.
GIRLS TO SETTLE
Y.W.C.A. QUESTION

Speakers to Instill Spirit and Science
at All-Fresh Meeting To-
night
GLASS WILL BE GUESTS OF
UNION AT "HULLABALOO"
Freshman attention will be focused
on two big events this evening, the
first, the All-fresh pep meeting for
the Spring games which will be held
at 7 o'clock in Natural Science audi-
torium and secondly, the ,All-fresh
smoker-better known as the "Hull-
abaloo"-which is scheduled for 7:45
o'clock at the Union.
The freshman band will be on hand
at the pep meeting to welcome the
whole class of '24, every member of
which is expected to turn out at the
meet. Dwight '. Joyce, '21, will give
the principal talk of the meeting, ex-
plaihing in detail the rules of the var-
ious Spring games. He will also give
a few hints how the freshmen may ob-
tain advantages over their opponents.
Captain to Speak'
Cameron A, Ross, '24E, freshman
captain, will give a short talk to in-
still spirit into the class. Yells will
be given and a call for tryouts for the
obstacle races, which will be held
Saturday morning, will be issued.
It is planned to make the meeting as
short as possible so that at 7:30, head-
ed by the freshman band, .the entire
group can march to the Uion for the
All-fresh smoker, where the class will
be guests of the entertainment com-
mittee of the Union-.
An elaborate program is planned
f' the evening. The leading stunt
o the smoker is a dance by "Salome"
who, it is rumored, came especially
for this event direct from Cairo, Egypt.
"Nobe" Wetherbee, '21L, and Myron E.
Chon, '23, will give a saxophone-piano
duet. A drinking song besides sev-
eral other rousing numbers are prom-
ised by the Freshman Glee club, which
will take part in the entertainmient.
Jazz Music; Free Punch
Another number, the exact nature
of which has not been divulged, will
take a prominent place in the pro-
gram as will several speeches by var-
ious members of the faculty. Harry
Gould's orchestra will give some
"jazzy" / selections which will, co-
bined with the drinking song and
free punch, lend a real freshman air
to the "Hullabaloo."
SWING-OUT BEING
SHOWN AT WUERTH
About 400 feet of film picturing
scenes taken from the senior Swing-
out last Thursday afternoon are be-
ing shown at the Wuerth theater this1
week. The pictures were made by the'
Detroit Free Press and the Pathe
News..
At the end of the week a print of
the picture will be. turned over to the
senior class. Mr. J. F. Wterth is
standing half of the expense for the 1
picture and the senior class the other
half. It is expected that this, print
will be used at class reunions and will
be shipped throughout the state toc
alumni gatherings. Mr. Wuerth has1
agreed to handle these shipments
whenever they are to be made.
Scenes were taken from in front of
the Library and from the top of the
Chemistry building. One shows the'
line of march from the Library to Hill
auditorium.
According to G. E. Planck, manager
of the Wuerth theater, a tenktive
agreement has been arranged be-
tween Mr. Wuerth and the Detroit

Free Press with regard to filming
more pictures in the future.
U. S. Heavy Loser Running Roans
Washington, May 9.-Loss to the
government in operation of the rail-
roads under federal control will be
about $1,200,000,000 or $300,000,000
more than was estimated by former
Director General Hines, according to
an estimate today by Director General
Davis.
The director general gave his esti-
mate in the course of a report to
Chairman Good of the house appro-
priations committee on the progress
made by the railroad administration
investigating -laims arising out of
federal control.

Second-Year Men Weigh in Today for
Three Tug-of-War
Teams
SOPHS WILL HAVE BAND TO
LEAD CLASS TO CONFLICT$
All members of the sopholitore
class who desire to take part in the
annual tug-of-war which will be held
next Saturday must report between 3
and 5:30 o'clock today in Dr. May's
office of Waterman gymnasium to get
"weighed-in" for the event.
The same system in deciding the
members of the various teams as
used by the freshmen will prevail at
the sophomore "weigh-in". Fifty.men
who weigh under 135 pounds each will
be selected for the lightweight team,
50 between 135 and 160 pounds will
be chosen to pull for the middle-
weights, and the 50 heaviest over the
160 mark will compose the heavy-
weight team.
"The sophomores wil have to turn
out in full force," said Roswell P.
Dillon, '21E, chairman of the Spring
games committee, "in order to keep
pace with the freshmen who practi-
cally swamped Dr. George A. May's
office yesterday in an endeavor to se-
cure places in the pull."
Awakened by the spirit shown by
the freshmen, the sophomores claim
that they wil have an even better
band than that of the '24 men to lead
them to the games Saturday morning.
Results of the freshman and sopho-
more "weigh-ins" will be announced
in Thursday's issue of The Daily.
TO -HOLD mAss.MEETING
FOR WOMEN TOMORROW,
MRS. POMEROY, '96, WILL PRE-
SENT WOMEN'S BUIL1$NG
PLANS
Mrs. Catherine Puncheon Pomeroy,
'96, of Chicago, will present the lat-
est developments in the plans for the
proposed Women's building at a mass
meeting of all University and town
women to be held at 4:15 o'clock Wed-
nesday, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall.
At this meeting the public formal In-
stallation of Woman's league officers
will also take place, after which the
new board takes charge of league af-
fairs.
fa. To Exhibit Plans
Mrs. Pomeroy will have all plans
drawn to date by Irving K. Pond,
"79, architect of the Union, and will
discuss the campaig'n to be waged in
behalf of the building.
"That every woman may understand
all developments in regard to the
building, it is necessary that both
University and town women appear
for this meeting," said Marguerite
Clark; '21, president of the Womens'
league. "The inauguration, too,
should be interesting to all. Though
it is an innovation here, a similar
ceremony is held in a number 'of
other universities. The whole pro-
gram will not consume more than one
hour."
Officers to Talk .
A few speeches will be made by
both retiring and incoming .officers,
who are: Marguerite Clark, '21, re-
tiring president; Edna Groff, '22, new-
ly elected; vice-president, Aletha
Yerkes, '21, Joyce McCurdy, '22;
treasure, Ruth Mills, '22, Frances
Ames, '23; corresponding secretary,
Josephine McGuineas, '21, Thrdosia
Burton, '23; recording secretary, Amy

Loomis, '22, and Katherine Kuhpman,
'23.
ALL-DENT DANCE TICKETS GO
ON OPEN SALE TOAORROW
Today will be the last day that-
tickets for the All-Dent dance will be
reserved for dental students. Start-
ing tomorrow any student can secure
tickets at either Moe's or Calkin's.)
The affair this year is to serve as a
climax for the gayety of Cap night,
taking place on May 20 in Barbour
gymnasium. Bob Debach's seven-'
piece orchestra, which includes two
pianos, has been engaed to furnish
the music.

Today is the -last day that tickets
for the third annual dance of the Jun-
ior engineers to be held Friday night
in Barbour gyminasium, will be re-
served for,'members of that class.
Tickets are $3 and may be obtained
from the committee in charge com-
posed of Robert Christian, Carl Vogt,
Robert Kersey, Paul Ackerman, and
Gordon Godley.
The committee states that the dance,
'which is sumuger -formal, will be lim-
ited to 150 couples. Favors will be
given this year although they were
omitted last year because of the ex-
pense involved. Rhodes' eight-piece'
orchestra has been engaged.
The chaperones will be Prof. and
Mrs. G. W. Patterson, Prof. and Mrs.
A. H. Lovell, and Prof. and Mrs. T. J.
Mitchell.
PROFESSOR MPUNRO
"Advertising in Middle Ages" Will be'
Subject of Princeton Faculty
Man
LECTURER IS AUTHORITY ON
CRUSADES AND MIDDLE AGES
Prof. Dana C. Munro, of Princeton
university, who lectures here Thurs-
day afternoon at 4:15 in the Natural
Science auditorium on "Advertising
in the Middle Ages" has been profes-
sor of medieval history at Princeton-
since 1915, where he entered the fac-
ulty from the University of Pennsyl-
vania.
According to Prof. E. W. Dow, of the
history department, Professor Mun-
ro is an interesting speaker and an
eminent authority on the 'middle ages.
"Professor Munro's lecture Will be
very instructive and interesting," stat-
ed Professor Dow, "and should be of
interest, not only to history students,
but to all men an'd women on the cam-
pus. Professor Munro is one of
America's foremost students on; the'
Middle Ages and the best American
authority on the Crusades."
Professor Munro has written vari-
ous' books dealing with Medieval his-
tory and life.
For, a time during the, war he, was
chairman of the National Board for
Historical Service.

ANNUAL ELECTION WILL F
OFFICES IN EIGHT ACTIVITI
FOR NEXT YEAR
CAMPAIGNING STRICTI
FORBIDDEN BY COUN
Few Names Out Because , of 1
Petitions or Ineligi-
bilityt.
More than 125 names will ap
on the ballot of the All-Campus e
tion tomorrow, when students
make their annual selections of
re entatives for eight organizati
comprising practically every mi
campus activity except the pubi
tions. Final details of the e'leci
machinery were completed yester
and the ballot material thrned la
to the printers,
Campus interest is centered on
election of the president of the
dent council, president and other
ficers of the Union, Student con:
representatives, members of the
dent Advisory committee, Board
Control of Student Publications, Bc
in Control of Athletics, EngineR
society officers, Student Ch'ristian
sociation officers, and Officers of
Oratorical association.
Campaigning Forbidden.
.Campaigning for any candidate
individuals or organizations is sti
forbidden'Student council officers
laring that any candidates rece
such aid will be barred from offic
Petitions of several men for ca
dacles were refused Eby the Stuc
council committee in charge of
tions, on the grounds of ineligibi
in several instances, and of petiti
being filed after the time limit
others.
Women will be allowed to vote
upon candidates for the'varou
flees of the Oratorical associat
Freshmen in all department will
allowed to cast ballbts.
To Rotate Names
Rotation of names on the ballot
multiples of 00 will insure eual'
portunitie to all of the candidate
having their names appear at
head of the groups in which they
running.
The polls will be open from
o'clock in the morning until .
o'clock in the afternoon. Engin
and achitects will cast their bal
at two tables placed in the engin
ing ach. All members of the lte
college will vote at tables in fi
of the Library, laws, will vote
front of the Law building, mediacs
front of the Mechanical bilding,
membetrs 'of the combined dep
ments - pharmnics, homoeops,
dehts - will cast their votes at
entrance to Waterman gymnasiur
NET MEN TO PLAY
TWICE THIS WEI
Two home meets is the portirp
the Varsity tennis team this week
Thursday the University of Oklah
Will be represented by a two i
team, while on Saturdayt Minnei
will oppose the Michigan' ra
wielders with a four man, aggre
tion.
The Oklahoma team Is, made u
the Parks twins, both of whom It
had a great, deal of court experiel
They are said to form one of the f
est doubles combinations in
S'outhwest. Captain Wesbrook
Munz will probably oppose the P
brothers both in singles and don!
Little is known of the' stretigtl
the team from Minneapolis. The Bi
ers did not figure prominently in

Conference meet last year, but tt
is no telling what new material 1
have appeared since then. As Cap
Wesbrook will in all probability
competing in the Illinois track n
on that day, four others will make
the Varsity. Munz, Angell, Mer
Reindel, and Brick are the men t
whom the team will probaly be
lected. Matches will be held bet'
the members of the Varsity sq
during the remainder of the wee]
determine the make-up of the tease
th- Minn""n^*. ^^"ta*t a"al n ^

SBALLOT TOf

C.

W. THOM, '23, DIES
AFTER OPERATION

Charles Walter Thom, '23,'of De-
troit, died at 6 o'clock last night in\'
the Detroit Harper hospital follow-
ing an operation for gall stones.
Thom left -the University to go home
for spring vacation and the next day
was stricken with an attack of gall
stones so that it was necessary to
be operated upon. Since that time he
was confined to the hospital. , He was
24 years of age.
Thom was gassed and wounded
twice while serving with the 32nd
division during the war, was cited for
bravery in action and received the
croix de guerre.
He was a member of the Acabia
fraternity, a 32nd degree Mason, and
was active in the American legion and
the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
COMEDY CLUB INITIATES 5
FOLLOWING SPRING TRYOUTS
As a result of the'- spring tryouts.
held Saturday morning,° Comedy club
has admitted as members, Harlow H.
Akers, '22, Catherine Greenough, '24,
Amy Loomis, '22, Christine Murkett,'
'22, and Helen Schermerhorn, '23.
The regular meeting of the club
will be held at 7:30 o'clock this even-1
ing in Sarah Caswell Angell hall. A
one act play entitled "The Goal" will
be presented at this time under the
direction of Wilfrid Laurie, '22L.' All
members, including those just admit-
ted, are requested to be present at
this time by the president as several
important matters pertaining to the
flub will be discussed.
To Give Garden Party for Junior Girls
Girls of the junior class will be en-
tertained at a garden party between"
3:30 and 5:30 o'clock Wednesday aft-
ernoon at the Pi Beta Phi house. The
afternoon will be spent in . dancing
and. card playing.

"What about the Y. W. C. A.?" That
is the question to be solved at a meet-
ing of all University women to be held
at 4 o'clock this afternoon in New-
berry hall.
The problem of whether Michigan
women can best express themselves
as a department of the S. C. A., or in
an organization which is a chapter of
thb national Y. W. C. A. is to 'be de-
cided definitely at this meeting.
Every woman enrolled 'in the Uni-
versity 'is requested to come to the
meeting and express her ideas on the

nd

'21, RitaI

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