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October 05, 1920 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

HUiaanir bNABI
HEADED BY MEDICS
HI CHI HEADS 1919-1920 SCHO-
LASTIC STANDINGS
LIST
Phi Chi, medical fraternity, led the
919-1920 list of comparative scholas-
.c standings of fraternities, sororities
,nd house clubs published by the Uni-
ersity, with an average of but one-
uarter of a point below 85 per cent.
'he complete comparative list was as
ollows:
General fraternities: Alpha Chi
igma, Kappa Beta Psi, Zeta Beta Tau,
elta Sigma Phi. Phi Sigma Kappa,
'hi Kappa Sigma, Theta Chi, Zeta Psi,
elta Kappa Epsilon. Acacia, Phi Sig-
aa Delta, Alpha Delta Phi, Delta Up-
ilon, Phi Gamma Delta, Sigma Phi,
'hi Kappa Psi, Kappa Sigma, all above
C grade, while Phi Delta Theta, Al-
ha Sigma Phi, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Al-
ha Tau Omega, Sigma Alpha Epsilon,
hi Mu Alpha, Theta Delta Chi, Lamb-
a Chi Alpha, Alpha Beta Chi, Beta
'heta Pi,,'Delta Tau Delta, Chi Psi,
igma Chi, Psi Upsilon, Sigma Nu, and
)elta Chi ranked successively below
C grade.
Sororities Above C
Collegiate Sorosis led the general
ororities, followed by Caryatides,
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Delta Gamma,
)elta Delta Delta, Pi Beta Phi, Chi
)mega, Alpha Chi Omega, Alpha Phi,
xamma Phi Beta, Kappa Alpha Theta,
nd Theta Phi Alpha, all above a C
rade.
Phi Chi, leading the professional
raternities, also topped the entire list.
they were followed by Phi Delta Phi,
Vu Sigma Nu, Phi Rho Sigma, Alpha
Kappa Kappa, Delta Sigma Delta, Al-
ha Kappa Psi, Phi Beta Pi, Psi Ome-
a, Psi Upsilon Rho, Alpha Rho Chi,
'hi Delta Chi, Sigma Delta Kappa,
'hi Alpha Delta, Gamma Eta Gamma,
)elta Theta Phi, above a C grade; and
Ki Psi Phi and Theta Xi, below a C
rade,
Alpha Epsilon Iota, the only pro-1
essional sorority, was graded between
9 and 80, well above a C average;
vhile Monks led the men's clubs, fol-
owed by Trigon and Hermitage, above
, C, and Phylon, below a C grade.
Houses Rank Well
Topping the women's clubs was 0.
T. Adams house, followed successively

by Fox house, Jenkins house, Martha'
Cook dormitory, Swezey house, Alum-x
nae house, Anderson house, Hall1
house, Cobb house, Helen Newberryl
residence, Episcopal house, Cannon)
house, Kent house, Whitney house,;
Sackett house, Caughey house, Y. A.x
Adams house, Comstock house, Parry
house, and Wheeler house, above the.
C. average. Below C were McLoutha
house, Wikle house and Goodrichi
house.!
FRESHMEN ENLIGHTENED
ON MICHIGH CUSTOMS
Y. M. C. A. "BIBLE" GIVES ADVICE;
TO THE CLASS
OF '24
Freshmen! . Do you know "The'
Way In"?
If you don't, be sure and read this
hand book, the freshman bible issued
by the University Y. M. C. A.
Prefaced by a word of welcome by
President Marion L. Burton, the 95-
page booklet is by far the largest
thing of the kind which the "Y" has
ever issued. The "Facts for Fresh-
men" are well worth the perusal of
all members of the class of 1924. Sage
advice -on such topics as "Getting set-
tled," "Learning to loaf," "Athletics,"
and "Michigan songs" is given by the
writers of the book.
Be a Freshman
In regard to the matter of being a
freshman "The Way In" says:
"Wear your little gray cap. It is
thus decreed. You have no option in
the matter. Better do it gracefully,
and proudly.
"Don't attempt to conceal the fact
that you are a freshman. The sea-
soned college man can identify a
freshman one hundred yards off; un-
less the latter should try to disguise
the fact that he is a freshman, in
which case he can be recognized at
half a mile.
"Ask questions. Be natural. Don't
be too chatty with upper-classmnen.
Having been provided with two ears,
two eyes, and only one mouth, the
ratio should be observed to the point
of seeing and hearing twice as much
as one talks. This is an impudent re-
mark. It is also true."
Tells of Churches
A section with pictures of the dif-
ferent Ann Arbor churches follows.

"Of the 7,800 students who registered
at the University of Michigan last Oc-
tober," says the booklet, "5,537 ex-
pressed a church preference. Careful
investigation demonstrated that 2,620
,were in more or less regular attend-
ance at the local churches during the
year."
The remaining portion of the pam-
phlet is taken up by general informa-
tion on University institutions and or-
ganizations.
Use Of Absent
Vi allo t Open T o
Student Voters
All students intending to vote by the
absent ballot in the November election
can secure information as to themethod
of application for ballot for their state
from the law library of the University.
Michigan voters living in cities of over
.10,000 population must register, as all
registration previous to September 1
is void. Student voters living in towns
having a population less than 10,000
may or may not be required to regis-
ter, according to the decision of their
city board. Correct information for
residents of the smaller towns may
be secured from the township clerk
of these towns.
Registration in the state of Michigan
closes October 16 in all towns of 10,000
or over and one week later in the
towns having a smaller population.
Voters who have not yet registered
are urged to communicate with their
city clerks immediately. The state
law requires the absent voter to have
his application for a ballot in the
hands of his county clerk at least 12
days before the election. Out of state
students, whose residence is in 4 state
where the absent ballot law is in ef-!
fect, can obtain ballots from their
county clerks.
Oberlin Enrollment Large; Rents L(w
Oberlin College has opened with the
largest enrollment in its history, ac-
cording to The Oberlin Review, but
without the shortage of rooms being
experienced in so many universities.
Oberlin rents average 50 cents a week
higher than formerly, or an average
rental of $15.00 a month for men.

MICHIGAN INSTITUTES~
UPPEROLASS ADISORSi

Courteous and satisfactory
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus, $625,000.00
Resources .........$5,000,000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North University Ave.

i

TUTTLE'S
LUNCH ROOM
Crowded every meal
BUT
Room for All Our
Last years customers
One half block South
of "MAJ"

(Continued from Page 1)

"He is desirous of doing his bit to
help Michigan retain her proud posi-!
tion. But he is soon lost in the mob.
He makes few friends and learns lit-
tle of his school. To eradicate this
condition is the purpose of this move-
ment."
In no other college in the country,
has the "big brother" movement been
launched on such a gigantic scale, ac-
cording to Union officials, who are de-
sirous that full co-operation be given
by the upperclassmen who are to con-
duct the work.
The advisors will meet at 7:15
o'clock Wednesday evening, Oct. 6, in
the second floor reading room of the
Union. President Marion L. Burton
will address them at this time. Com-
mittee officials report that President
Burton is enthusiastic over the plan
and anxious to see it successfully
worked out.
Paul Eaton, '21, president of the
Union, and Chairman Albert C. Jacobs
will explain the details of the plan at
this meeting.
It is expected that by October 11
each of the mentors will have received
a list of the freshmen he is to visit
and that the system will be in full
swing by that time.
The plan will be explained to the
freshmen engineers at their assembly
on Wednesday, October 6, and to the
freshmen of the literary college on
Monday, October 11. Chairman Ja-
cobs has an office in room 306 of the
Union where he will interview ad-
visors.
Officers Elected by Newark Club
Recent elections held by members
of the Greater Newark, N. J., club re-
sulted in the reappointment of Carl
Baccaro, '21D, to the presidency. Ber-
nard Finkelstein, '23E, vice-president;
Leo J. Hershdorfer, secretary, and
Stephen Golinski, treasurer, were the
other men elected to office. The date
of the first regular meeting of the club
has been set for 7:30 Saturday even-
ing, October 9, in room 306 of the
Union.

11

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