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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 08, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T1-

I MICHIGAN DAILY

Eitro sn Dattlj
KAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OP MICHIGAN
I every morning except Monday during the Univer-
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
EMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ociated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
tis paper and the local news published therein.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ion by carrier er mail, $3.50.
Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street
Business, 96o; lEditorial, 2414.
cations not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
scessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
tices of events will be published in The Daily at the
the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office
nmunications will receive no consideration. No man
*e returned unless the writer incloses postage.
y doe not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
e commnuicationls.
Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
g preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
EDITOR .... GEORGE O. bROPHYaJR
- Chesser !11 flatiih.
torial Board......................Lee Woodruff
Adams H. W. Hitchcock
Dakin J. E. McMania
ad Sherwood T. W. Sargent.Jr
r ..... ....... . J. A. Bernstein
... .- -B.- P. Campbell
...T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T.Beach
............ ..........Robert Angell
tor.................... ........Mary D. Lane
.......... Thomas Dewey
..........Jack W. :Kei.Iy

Assistants
Frank H. McPike
v W. Ottaway
Paul W atzel
Byron Darnton
M. A Klaver
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
Sara Waller
H. S. Howlett

BUSSIESS STAFF
Telephone 960
lESS MANAGER...........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
tising,.........................--..D-.- - Joyce
eds ..... ..... ........... ". .S. Kunstadter
adon ............- .....-- - - M.Heath
at .,,............ ............--- -- -' E. R. P iehe
itn".............................. v. F. Hillery
Assistants
V. Lambrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
Hamel, Jr. N. W. Robertson M, S. Goldring
I. utchiason Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
A. 'ross R. G.,1urchell W. Cooley
. L. Davis A. J. Parker
ersnas wishing to sec'ure information concerning news for any
Qi The Daily should ste the night editor, who has full charge
news to be printed that night.
SUNDAY, MAY 8, 1921.
Night Editor-L. ARMSTRONG KERN
FACTS ON THE CANDIDATES
day's supplement contains the list and mdi-
Li records of the nominees for campus offices
voted upon at Wednesday's election. It is the
ess of'every student to read through the data
ery mhan he is to consider in making his choice
e polls.
I'here is only one fair ground for picking a
to serve in a responsible student office: that of
-ience, actual proof of ability. The activities
ds after the names in the supplemept give some
nable basis for judgment. Popularity with-
>roved qualifications is not a fair reason for
ig an (X) after a candidate's name. Such a
puts a premium oi the gladhand system rather
hard work and merit. It may be pleasant for
opular man, but it is bad for the student activi-
vhich have to suffer by it.
ad the supplement record; inquire about the
dates; and then vote right - from a Michigan,
personal standpoint.
REMEMBERING MOTHER
ce each year a special day has been set as a
when Mothers throughout the land are to be
nbered, and their memories revered. Today
een selected this year for Mothers' day, and
urged that everyone's mother be remembered
e wearing of flowers.
athers' day is one of those few occasions dur-
he year which are aimed to make us just, a lit-
tter and to bring s just a little nearer to the
iation of what mother has done for each one
- of the sacrifices she has made and of the
and the devotion which she bears for us. It is
r for reflection, when we may stop for a mo-
, at least, and instill into our hearts the es-
:'of the spirit in which the day is meant.
o often in the heydey of our college pleasure,
re prone to forget the love of those at home.
frequently our thoughts turn carelessly away
the task of letter-writing and we let slip the
rtunity for making someone's heart just a little
er because we have remembered. It is such a
effort for the pleasure which it means to some-
lse - the altruism is so cheaply bought - so
make this a one hundred per cent Mothers'
a day of resolution to keep her even closer in
wearts and in our actions.
FOR MEN AND MAGAZINES
ery Sedgwick, editor of the Atlantic Monthly,
editing is an art, and its product a work of
the magazine has a need out of which it is
; it is a living, vital thing, with qualities and
s" like a human being; it is read and combated
reed with, appreciated or disliked, as is a man;
times it must be itself, as a man must be if
to make any impress; and it dies, like any
living thing, on its appointed day and when
[ace and need for it have passed.
me of those who heard Mr. Sedgwick very
ally turned his talk in upon themselves and
i to wonder whether men - not to speak of
zines live up to this idea of the proer

place of a human being. How many of us feel that
we ought to have a genuine mission in life, and
strive to fulfill it? How many try to acquire that
character, that individuality, which men- and pub-
lications - ought to have? How many refuse to be
other than themselves? The world is too full of
copyists whose character is not well enough devel-
oped, or whose faith in themselves has not been
sufficiently reasoned into existence, to let them
stand alone - original contributors, whether right
or wrong, to the world's thought and action. Too
few of us are Emersons, just as too few magazines
are Atlantics in this quality.
"Be ourselves" is as good a motto for all men as
"Be a living, vital thing" would be as a phrase to
set forth the goal of a good magazine.
THE POOR PRESENT
It is characteristic of folks human to worship the
past, usually at the expense of the present. In
retrospect blemishes and defects fade out beneath
the dominant light of pleasant experiences, of ro-
mantic existence, and of individual accomplish-
ments. While today may seem drab because of
the tedious details of life, still in the future when
memory has shed the harshness of its lines, faults
and disadvantages are forgotten in an overwhelm-
ing desire to return to the remembered "good" of
the "good old days". This is the nature of mhan,
and it is evident that the average alumnus is only
human.
The student body of Michigan reveres its past
and honors its traditions. It also cherishes the
present, possibly above all else. Therefore an af-
front to our loyalty is offered each time, and it is
often, that the present is deploringly compared to
the past, the former suffering' intensely by one-
sided comparison. An example of this is the long-
ing, recently expressed in a poetic manner by
Grantland Rice, for the Michigan of old with her
Heston and numerous other celebrities and quali-
ties'
We of today are confident that our University
is as fine now, if not finer, than in previous years;
we are conceited enough to feel that the capacities
of t-hepresent student body are as great as those of
the men who preceded us; we are sufficiently loyal
to believe that Michigan is progressing rather than
-retrogressing
Fidelity to their Alma Mater is a worthy and re-
spected quality in Michigan graduates ; but must
the satisfactory present suffer in order better to set
off a brilliant past?
Let this be the requiem of the editor of the
1920-1921 Telescope, whose last last line as "Noah
Count" is printed below: he stood by his' guns of
principle to the end. Saturday afternoon at the
crucial point in the ball game, he was seen to sweep
off his cap in an angry gesture, turn in disgust to
the others in the press stand, and exclaim: "Lord!
Look at those poor goofs letting co-eds drag 'em
away when it's six all in the seventh!"
Edwin R. Meiss succeeds Mr. Kelly today at the
lens of Telescope.
Don't take to a shortcut because there is a path.
Stick to the walks and the path will be raked over
and planted.
T"heTelescopbe
Our Swan Song
They noted those features gaunt and gray,
They marked that face devoid of hope;
All marvelled much until they learned
He used to run the Telescope.

" AT -

BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
Open Evening During Sale

I

I

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. mn., and hourly to 9:10 p. mn
Limiteds to'Jackson at 8:48 a. min. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. In.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 1:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. n.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m.. 12:25 a.m., and 1 :15 a.m.
Locals to Jacks on--7:6b0 u.in., and
12:10 p.m.

P ain Your Own Way?
Sell Brushes in your home town or elsewhere during summer.

Good Money-Maling Proposition.

CALL 1268 BETWEEN 6:15 AND 7:1

OR WRITE 1007 E. HURON

I,

ANNUAL BOOK SA

.

......

I.

19212
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22
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9
16
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36

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MAY
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12
19
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1921
W S
7
14
21
28'

Energine,

-4

PANAMAS
We Clean, Bleach and Block
Panamas., etc., into the Late
Shapes, with all new trimmings
to look Just like new. We don't
use any acids and do only High
Class Work. Factory Hat Store,
617 Packard St. Phone 1792.
Lightweight imported golf hose.
$3.00 upward. Wild & Co., State St.-
Adv.
Beautiful line of combs for the
Architects' Ball. Saunder's Hair Shop.
---Adv.
DON'T FORGET
TO OBTAIN SOME OF
SWAIN'S
Views of the Campus and
Huron River for your
M-Book.,
Especially careful service in
film developing and printing
for arateurs
713 E. UNIVERSITY AV.

Swissilizing

.leans more than just

Dry, Cleaning

We can prove it

G-

209 S.
4th Ave.

Phone 2508
GCuta G ani
"ie )Come cf Snerg ne"
Phone 2508

209 S.
4th Ave.

rrrrurnnrrrunuunrrunrrunrruu

With this issue of the Telescope we lay down
our editorial pen and commit the keeping of the
column to other and better hands. The above lit-
tle meterless couplet represents a futile attempt to
explain just how much this parting has affected us.
Only those who haye known the depths of a fa-
ther's love can appreciate what this parting for-
ever frdm our brain child means to us.
Our grief is accentuated when we reflect that it
means the breaking off of the intimate spirit of
friendship and co-operation which has always ex-
isted between us and the fewer though frailer sex on
this campus. We feel assured that they have under-
stood from the beginning the spirit behind the gibes
at their expense ; that their girlish intuition has
told them that any Pythian darts we may have
aimed at them have never been tipped with the ar-
rowhead of personal venom.
We hope that our readers will give our successor
the same co-operation as they have in the past in
the matter of contributions, and we join with them
in wishing him bon voyage as he embarks on his
journalistic journey.
Dear Noah:
Are moth balls really a good thing to use for
killing moths? S. X..K.
We can't say for sure, but we imagine you would
have a rather hard time hitting the moths with
such small balls.
Little we think,
Less we do,
Ain't it funny
How we get through.
Famous Closing Lines
"Swingout day," muttered the convict as they
led him to the gallows.
NOAH COUNT.

)

"N41
,. 71~iK 'N
(~) <s

We are making a specialty
of GOLF Suits in English
Tweeds and Homespuns,
White Flannels and Blue
Sport Coats

~+ .7
: ' /1

Dobb's .

. Straws

Season 1921

C~Th. c.

Clothiers, Furnishers and
Hatters
S. State St. at William St.

0,0

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