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May 04, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DCOOL
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PREL
DAY AND NIG
' SEIRM

11

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1921.

PRICE

Sa NOTE TELLS
RMANY TO MAKE
'FERS TO ALLIE
ON UNKNOIWN FOIR SUDYEN
SENDING AFTER LONG
DELAY

Aryan Sends 2,ooo Pamphlets Here
Denouncing Menace of Darwinism

LIN

William Jennings Bryan has sent
2,000 copies of his pamphlet, "The
Menace of Darwinism", to Ann Arbor
for free distribution among students
of the University.
In this booklet Mr. Bryan declares
that the Darwinian theory as now rec-
ognized and fostered by educators in
American colleges and universities is
undermining the belief of the Ameri,
can youth in a. personal God andea
personal immortality. He seeks to
SENATE VOTES 18-1 TO"
*RESTRICT IMMIGRATI
FOR NEXT 14 MONTHS

La

Agrees on
With

in Connection
Reparations

show that Darwinism is a mere hy-
pothesis;, that obscures God and weak-
ens all the virtues that rest upon the
religious tie between "God and man;
that it admits, or permits one to be-
lieve in a God, but puts the creative
act so far away that reverence for the
:Creator is likely to be lost.
"Darwinism," writes Mr. Bryan.
"transforms the bible into a story
book and reduces Christ to the stature
of a man.". Referring to the influ-
ence of Darwinism in the university,
he states:
. The instructor gives the student a
new family tree millions of years
long, with its roots in the water (ma-
rine animals) and then sets him adrift,
with infinite capacity for good or evil
but with no more light .to guide him,
no compass to direct him, and no
chart of the sea of life."
'hose who wish may obtain copies
of the article at either the Y. M. C.
A., the Y. W. C. A., or Cushing's drug
store.
PREISPUiNG GAlES PEP
MEETINDATES DECIDED

(By Associated Press)
Washington, May 3.-In urging Ger-
many to make at once, "directly to the
allied goVernment," adequate pro-
posals on reparations, the American
government in its note in answer to
the German proposals, was believed
by the allied diplomats here to have
closed definitely the, reparations inci-
dent, so far as the United States was
concerned.
Administration officials refused to-
day to comment on the communication
saying that it spoke for itself. Nor,
would they indicate the considerations
which caused its dispatch, somewhat
unexpectedly, at a late hour last night.
It was stated, however, that action
was taken,without any communication
having been received from the allied
supreme council at London.
London, May 3.-Complete agree-
ment has been reached among the
allies on the measures to be taken in
connection with the German repara-
tions question, it was announced this
evening at conclusion of the supreme
council's session. The council had
summoned the members of the repara.
tions committee from Paris to assist
in drawing the protocol for presenta-
tion to the German government.
The members of the. reparations
commission were expectdd to reach
London tomorrow and complete the
document by tomorrow evening, when
the text of the official abstract will be
made public.
The Allied ultimatum will be sent
to Germany not later than May 6, and
will expire six days from that date.
DAVIS INVITED TO
LECTURE IN SOUTH
Prof. C. O. Davis, of the department
of education, has acceptef afn invita-
tion to deliver three addresses before
the Summer session of the University
of Louisiana at Baton Rouge during
the week of June 19.
Professor Davis is also scheduled to
give a course of five lectures before,
the Educational institute of the city.
of Altoona, Pa., during the last week'
of August.
Professor Davis' lectures will deal
With educational problems and will
include a wide range of subjects. At
Baton Rouge he will speak on "Thel
Function of the High School Princi-
pal", "Reorganization of Secondary-
Schools",and "Citizenship and the'
High School". His main lecture at
Altoona will be given on "Educational
Values".

ADMISSION OF ALIENS SET
SHOWINGS OF 1910
CENSUS ,

BY

(By Associated Press)'
Washington, .May 3. - The senate
late today passed the emergency im-
migration bill fixing admission of
aliens to three per cent of each na-
tionality resident inthe United States
in 1910. The bill is -effective for 14
months beginning 15 days after enact-
ment. The vote on passage was 78 to
1, Senator ]teed, Democrat, Missouri,
opposing the measure.
Previously the senate defeated Sen-
ator Johnson's amendment to exempt.
from provisions of the bill aliens suf-
fering from religious and political
persecutions in their native country.
DETECTIVES FIND NO
' .
UES TO LEVY UDER
Detroit detectives who were in Ann
Arbor investigating all clues relative
to the murder of Bertram Levy, '23,
who was killed while walking along
Boston boulevard in Detroit Saturday
morning, returned without uncovering
any new evidence, though several of
Levy's friends were questioned.~
That on ignorant' foreigner killed
Levy is the belief or Chief O'Brien of
the Ann Arbor police, and this con-
clusion has also been reached by sev-
eral Detroit investigators. According
to O'Brien the foreigner probably ac-

NEXT TUESDAY SET FOR
MEN AND WEDNESDAY
SOPHOMORIS

FRESH-
FOR

Pep meetings in preparation for the
Spring games are to .be held . at 7
o'clock next Tuesday night for the
freshmen and at 7 o'clock next Wed-
nesday night for the sophomores in
the lecture room of the Physics build-
ing.
"The success of this year's Spring
games depends entirely on the attend-
ance at these meetings," said Roswell
P. Dillon, '21E, chairman of the
Spring ga/es committee. "We shall
carefully go over all the rules' of
every game, give tips to both classes,
and endeavor to make plain any ques-
tions that arise in regard- to the con-
tests," he said.
Captains and lieutenants for the
two classes are to be chosen entirely
from the engineers this year, as they
were selected from the lits last year.
Cameron A. Ross, '24E, has already'
been elected to captain the freshmen
and he will appoint the lieutenants in
a short time. The sophomores have

KALES TO ADDRESS
10 COIF IINITIATES
Chicago Lawyer Gives Public Address
This Afternoon; Banquet
Planned for Tonight
MEN INITIATED YESTERDAY
AFTERNOON IN LAW BUILDING
Newly elected members of the Or-
der of the Coif, national legal schol-
arship society, were initiated yester-
day afternoon in the Law building and
will attend the annual dinner given
in their honor at 6:30 o'clock tonight
in the Union.
The annual public address under the
auspices of the organization will be
given at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon in
room C of the Law building by Mr.
Albert M. Kales, of the Chicago bar.
His subject is "Fundamentals of the
Social Order".
The 10 men initiated yesterday are:
J. P. Thoman, L. E. Waterbury, H. M.
Shapero, W. N. Snow, A. W. Boyd, L.
H. Mattern, H. R. Smith, A. G. Buoch-
ard, H. A. August, and J. I. McClin-
tock.
Members of the faculty, alumni, and
the initiates will attend the banquet
this evening. The principal speech
will be given by Mr. Kales and re-
sponses will be delivered for the new
members by L. E. Waterbury. Dean
Henry M. Bates, of the Law school, as
president of the Michigan chapter, will
act as toastmaster, and President-
emeritus Harry B. Hutchins will be
present and will give an address.
In commenting on Mr. Kales, who
is to give the address this after-
noon, Dean H. Bates said that he is a
prominent legal scholar and a lawyer
of great distinction. He Is a mem-
ber of the Chicago firm of Fisher, Boy-
den, and Kales and has been a pro-
fessor of law at Northwestern uni-
versity, Harvard, and the University
of Chicago. He is the author of the
leading book on "Future Interests ad
Property" and his work on "Contracts
And Agreements in Restraint of
Trade". is the recognized authority.
Minor additions to arrangements
for Swing-out as announced in yes-
terday's Daily were made by the Stu-
dent council committee in charge last
night. The place of asembly of Un-
iversity and Homoeop nurses, whose
position was not decided upon pre-
viously, has been fixed behind the lit
women, who form on the walk leading
from the Library to University hall.
In case of rain the classes will meet
in the buildings nearest to their place
of assembly, it was also announced.
Two members of the Student coun-
cli committee were in Detroit yester-
day making arrangements for the' mo-
tion pictures, which, it is hoped, will
be taken of all the classes as they are
assembled around the Library before
their march to Hill auditorium.
BAILEY, PARKER SPEAK AT
ENGINEER SMOKER TONIGHT
All electrical engineering students
are invited to attend the All-electri-
'cal smoker under the auspices of the
American institute of Electrical Engi-
neers, at 7:30 o'clock this evening at
the Union.
PProf. Benjamin F. Bailey and Prof.

J. E. Parker, of the engineering . de-
partment, will address the students.
Music and refreshments(will be furn-
ished.

ADELPHI FRESHMEN
DEFEAT ALPHA NU
In the last of a series of seven an-
nual debates, members of the Adelphi
freshmen debating -team won a unan-
imous victory over their opponents,
the freshman members of the Alpha
Nu debating team, last evening. This
victory gives to the Adelphi the pos-
session of the silver loving cup pre-'
sented by Delta Sigma Rho, national
honorary debating society.
The question for the debate was:
"Resolved, that the Philippine Islands
should be granted their immediate In-
dependence by the United States."
The Adelphi presented the affirmative,
and the Alpha Nu the negative side
of the debate.
STATE 'IGH SCHOOL
DEBATE TITLE DECIDED
EAST JORDAN HIGH DEBATES
WITH WESTERN NORMAL
OF KALAMAZOO
Sarah Caswell Angell hall will be
the scene of the state -championship
high school debate at 8 o'clock tonight
when East Jordan high meets West-
ern Normal high of Kalamazoo in de-
ate on the question of court settle-
ment of disputes. The -negative side
will be upheld by the later of the two
schools and the affirmative by the
former.
Miss Winifred Axtell, Allen Maybee,
captain of the team, who is here in a
state contest for the second time, and
Donald Gorham are the representa
tives of Western Normal.
Arthur Secord, Floyd.Lisci, and
Payl Franseth of East Jordan will ar-
rive in Ann Arbor this morning.
The judges for the contest tonight
are J. Stuart Lathers .of Ypsilanti,
Prof. E. D. Dickinson of the law de-
partment, and Prof. C. E. Griffin of
the economics department. Prof. W.
D. Henderson of the Extension serv-
ice will preside.
UNON MAYl PUBLISH,
FRESHMA N HANDBOOK
"If the Union desires to publish
the freshman handbook next year I
do not think the Student Christian as-
sociation will object," sid Thomas S.
Evans, secretary of the association
yesterday. "We merely request that
the proper 9noqnt of space be given
to the religious side of University
life." The statement was made in
connection with the recommendation
of the upperclass assembly last Sun-
day that the Michigan Union and the
Student council take ,charge of pub-
lishing the freshman handbook next
year.
Mr. Evans went on to say that'the
work of the Student Christian asso-
ciation is primarily religious, and that
any other service the organization
performs is merely incidental.
HOSPITAL WORKERS,
BUILDERS CONFER
Officers of the union employees at
the new University hospital and rep-
resentatives of the( Thompson-Star-

rett Construction company,, who are
doing the building, were in confer-
ence in Detroit yesterday over the
wage scale to be used at the hospital
during the coming summer.
It is expected by , officers of the
Building Trades council that a de-
finite agreement will be reached by
today or tomorrow.
Carpenters, plumbers and electrici-
ans are holding out for a dollar an
hour while the contractors wish to re-
duce the wage scale to 80 cents an
hour.
Barnes to Play Chess in Detroit
George S. Barnes, '24, chess expert,
-will leave this city tomorrow for De-
troit, where he will play one of the
20 simultaneous boards of chess with
Samuel Rzeschewski, nine year old
chess masters who is touring the Un-
ited States. The exhibition will take
place at 8:30 o'clock tomorrow eve-
ning in the Detroit Y. M. C. A: Barnes
will be accompanied by Donald C.
1 McCabe, '24. his manager.

FEEL THAT SYSTEM WOULJ
NO BETTER NOW THAN
PREVIOUSLY
VETERAN FOOTBALL
MEN FAVOR CHA1
Dean Bursley Feels It Is Necei
for First Year Men to
Become Acclimated
Faculty sentiment as a who
strongly opposed to the revival of
letics between Michigan freshmel
freshmen of other colleges. Follo
the action takensbythe junior
senior classes test Sunday in f~
ing a change in t1e conference ri
many members of the Unive
teaching staff have been intervi
and all have expressed a strong
sire that the present system be
tinued.
In the opinon of ftaculty me
change whereby freshmen could
part in- outside games would be
more satisfactory now. than form
when such a system was in vogu
is highly desirable, they believe,
freshmen should think-first of ma
an adjustment to University ci
tions, and of pursuing good sch
ship in order that they may .be
eligible for Varsity teams.
Football Men Favor Idea
Football men, on the other h
are strongly in favor of outside
petition for the freshmen, and
eral believe- that the University
Michigan should take the initiatli
securing a change in the confer
ruling.
"I am not in favor of the cha
said Prof. Ralph Aigler, of the B
in Control of Student Athletics,
terday. "It did not work out for
and I am sure it will not at the :
ent time. It is necessary for first
athletes to get well established
their work and In the long run 1
men can help the University far:
by remaining eligible than by p
outside university teams. Fresi
are apt to fall down in their
when they are involved in outsid
terests and I believe it is to favor
letic interests here to leave the
ferende ruling as it is."
Dean Bursley Opposed
Dean Joseph A. Bursley bel
that if freshmen played outside t
they would fall down in their -
and by becoming ineligible harm
letics here. It takes time, in his
for, for freshmen to get adjuste
the University' and to form met
of study, and if they spent the
month br so of their freshman
here in playing outside football t
they would soon fall down and be
ineligible.
"I should like to see the old sy
back," Angus Goetz, '22M, st
"There would be. greater nterei
athletics at this University as a
suit and freshmen would ome -o'
larger numbers and work harder
"The University of aichian s
take the initiative and change
presdnt conference ruling wh
first year mnen cannot -ply our
teams," Tad Wieman,°'21,adec
"Outside competition is absol
necessary and a change 'in the sy
is highly desirable."
Yesterday 's Gan
American League
Detroit 13, Chicago 1.
New York'2, Boston 0.
Washington 4, Philadelphia 2.
Cleveland-St. Louis-no game.
National League

New York 7, Boston 2.
No otler games played.
CAMPBELLr,'22, WITHDRAWS
NAME FROM CAMPUS BAI
Brewster P. Campbell, '22, annc
ed his withdrawal from candida
the Student council from the juni
class and for the Congregational
presidency of the S. C. A. yeste
the withdrawal being due to tl
cent annointment announced b

FACULTY 0
OUTSIDE
F-OR Fl

costed Levy with intention, 'to
him but when Levy gave battle
man shot him..

rob
the

not yet elected their captain.
The committee in charge of

thee

A rcehiets Ball
Plans Complete
Those who have passed through the
Engineering arch the last few days
have noticed the large red v "ball",
hdhg from the windows of the Archi-
tectural school and bearing in , white
figures 'the name o'f the real- ball, to
take place Friday night in Barbour
gymnasium.
Work on the decorations, whose im-
posing nature is foreshadowed by this
advert:sement, is progressing rapid-
'cy, according to the committee in
charge. Most of the students of the
college have'been at work all weak
'on their completion and the rest of the
time before the dance will be required
ftr their erection in Barbour gymna-'
slum.
It -was decided by the committee yes-
terday that no flowers will be worn at
the dance. It was also announced at
the same time that tuxedos would be
permitted, although the dance was
planned to be strictly summer for-
mal.
Tickets are 'practically sold out, the
few remaining being obtainable from
Frank Andrus at the Architectural
college or at 822 Arch street.
Tau igma ,Delta
Elects ?rive lien

ELECTION CANDIDATES
The Daily' will devote next
Sunday's Supplement to the All-
campus election and the records
of all candidates will be printed.
to assist the 'voters in naming
their choices.
Every candidate is requested
to mail to the Sunday editor of
'the Daily a statement of his col-
lege activities and his qual-
iations 'for office. These state-
ments must be in not later than
Wednesday afternoon..
In those cases where candi-¢
dates have not yet been named,
the men who expect nomination
are requested to send in their

games wishes to stress the fact that
old clothes and tennis shoes are to be
worn for' all the contests. The poles
to be used in the flag rush Saturday,
morning, May 14, which are to be 30
feet fong and 10 to 12 inches in diam-
eter, have been donated by the De-'
troit Edison company for the occa-
sion. Every precaution will be taken
to insure that no greasing of the
poles will take place.
Definite announcement will be made,
in tomorrow's Daily as to the time',
days, and place that "'weighing in"
will be conducted next week.
Music St udentis
PerformT oday
Advanced students in the voice,;
piano, and violin departments of the
University School of Music will give a
public recital at 4:15 o'clock this aft-
ernoon at the school.
The 'program is as follows:
Jeux d'Eau........... ....Ravel
Violet Ingleright
Silent Woe; Oh Irmingarde, How
Fair Art Thou; Anathema
(from 'Elilaid) .....Von Fielitz
'Edgerton Williams
32 Variations...........Beethoven
Constance Ohlinger
Adagio and Perpetual Motion.. ..Ries
Clarence Post
Prelude and Fugue...........Bach
Sonatina ......... .........Ravel
Samuel Robinson
Allah .................... Chadwick
In Italy ..........eanne Boyd
Corinne Woodworth
Nocturne............Chopin
La Campanelle.......Paganni-Liszt
Frank Bishop
La Fileuse............... ....Roff
Victoria Wordelman
Ecstacy. . ......... ....Beach
Unrequited Love. ......LaForge
. a Marjory West "
Kreisleriana, Nos. 1, 6, 8....Schumann
Anna Btene

i
i

NOTICE

't.

sires to have the
y candidate in or
rtality' may be
11 take no respon-

Tau Sigma Delta, international
scholarship society in architecture'
and allied arts, elected five men to
membership at their meeting a week
ago. Annourcement was made of this
fact yesterday and the men will be in-
itiated the middle of this month.
The men selected were as follows:
G. W. Gill, '20A, E. D. Straight, '21A,
J. J. Zimmerman, '22A, and Gilbert
Clgg1an .A Fierinegriar'e

So many requests are being
received for box notices on the
front page of The Daily that it
has become necessary to re-
strict such announcements to
those issued by some official de-
partment of the University.
From now on all class notices
and meeting announcements, will
be run in the What's Going On or
U-Notice column which appears
on the last page of this paper.
Readers are requested to consult
this column each day 'for the
aforementioned information.
THE 'EDITOR.

1

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