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May 03, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NTINUED
ODAY

1

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4Iai4h

AL

PAY AM) M(~
SERRVI

No. 146

I.

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a

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MAY 3, 1921,

PRICE

3MINATES
RTES FOR'B
S5 ELECTIONI

J. M. WINTERS
1EID T

ALL PETITIONS MUST
BE FILED BY SATURDAY
Nominations Made for VIce-Presidents,
Recording Secretary, and
Councilman
Nominations of 'candidates for
president of the Union, five vce-pres-
idents, recording secretary and stu-
dent councilman-at-large, to be voted,
upon at the All-campus elections next
Wednesday, May 11, were made last
night by the nominating committee.
R. Emersoi Swart, '22E, and John
M. Winters Jr., '23L, were put up for
.president of the Union to succeed Paul
Eaton, '21. For' -recording secretary,
the names of Robert F. Barie Jr., '22,
and Frank H. Lee -Jr., '22, will appear
on the ballot Donald J. Porter, '21,
is the retiring recording secretary.
,Vlce-Presidential Nominees
For vice-presidents of the Union, one
man will be 'elected from each of the
groups of the following colleges:
*Literary-J. A. Bernstein, '22, Rob-
ert J. Cooper, '22, and Guy, R. Moul-
throp, '22.
Law-Richey B. Reavill, '22L, and
Harry C. Willson, '22L.
Einginering-Edmund H. Fox, '22E,
George E. Gregory, '22E, and Edwin
A. Krueger, '21E.
Medic-Eugene R. Elzinga, '22M,
and Paul M. Moore, Jr., '22M.
Dent and Pharmic-Donald C. Cult
ver, '22P, Robert F. Deebach, '23D,
and Robert MW. Winslow, '23D.
Council Nominees
For Student councilman-at-large-
Clarene Hatch, Jr., '22, and Roland
V. Libonati, '22.
Nominations by petition are requir-
ed to have 200 names and must be
filled by 9 o'cloc'k next Saturday
morning. The point is covered in the
constitution of the Union as follows:
"Any 200 members of the Union, by
signing a petition and filling it prop-
erly signed, with the recording sec-
retary at or before 9 o'clock a. W. of
the fourth day -preceding the date set
for election, may nominate a candi-
date or candidates for any or all of
such offices."
The Union nominating comnittee
this year was composed of Lester ,E.
Waterbury, '21L, chairman; C. Stew-
art Baxter, '21, LeGrande A. Gaines,
Jr., '21E, Angus G. Goetz, '22M, and
Allen G. Boynton, '21D.
DR. CORA BEST WILL TALK ON
MOUNTAIN CLIMBING TOMORROW
"Bringing the Mountains to Moham-
med" will be the subject of a lecture
by Cora Johnstone Best, a represent-
ative of the Alpine club of Canada, un-
der the auspices of the Teachers' club
of Ann Arbor at 8:15 o'clock tomor-
row,- night in Pattengill auditorium.
The lecture will be illustrated by her
personal collection of slides made
from photographs taken. 1y herself
and her artists on trips into unfre-
quented parts of Glacier National park
and other ,places.
Doctor Best holds records for pion-
eer mountain climbing in all parts of
the world, having visited the moun-
tain. districts of Japan, Alaska, Eu-
rope, Siam, and China.,
The lecture will be free of chrge.

Hanford Accepts
faculty Position
Prof. James Holly Hanford, of the
University of North Carolina, will join
the University faculty next September.
A wire, announcing his acceptance of
the appointment made by the Board
of Regents last Friday, was received
by President Marion L. Burton yester-
day afternoon.
The appointment of Professor Han-
ford was made by the Regents on the
recommendation of Dean John R. Ef-
finger and with the approval of Pres-
ident Burton. By this appointment the
English department will be consider-
ably strengthened.
DIXON SHUTS OUT
BO ILERMAIKER NIINE
Lets Down Purdue Batters with Three
Hits, Strikes Out Eleven, and
a Walks Only Two
WOLVERINIE SUGGERS BEGIN
GAME BY SCORING TWO RUNS
Lafayette, Ind., May 2.-Hurling the
nicest ball exhibited by a Michigan
twirler this season, Dixon led the
Wolverine nine to a five to nothing
victory-over*Purdue here today for the
Maize and Blue's second Conference
Victory. Timely hits combined with
excellent hurling brought the Wol-
verines an easy win. .
in his nine innings on the mound,
Dixon had things entirely his own
way. Eleven Boilermakers were
struck out by the Wolverine hurler,
only two were passed, and three hit
safely. Two errors by the Michigan
players did not come at a time to let
Purdue seriously threaten.
The Wolverine batters began col-
iectng their five runs early in the
game and landed on Wallace, the Pur-
due portider, for two runs in the first
inning. Another counter was scored
in the fourth, -and the Michigan bat-
ters collected a run in the eighth and
in the ninth.
Score by Innings
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9-RHE
Michigan ...2 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1-5 8 2
Purdue .....00 0 0 0 00 0 0-0 3 1
Batteries - Dixon and Vick for
Michigan; Wallace, Volkstadt, Burns,
and McQuaid for Purdue.
Urbana, Ill., May 2.-The University
of Illinois baseball team today defeat-
ed Notre Dame, 5 to 2! Home runs by
Vogle, of Illinois, and Kiley, of Notre
Dame, featured the contest. The
weather was extremely cold.
Score by Innings
1 2 34 5 6 7 8 9-RHE
Notre . Dame.0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0-2 4 1
Illinois ...010 0 1 0 2 1 x--5 7 1
Batteries - Falvey and 'Elierzer-
kneecht, for Notre Dame; Jackson
and Dougherty, for Illinois..
ludget Is Subject
Of Furton 's Talk
Results of the recent legislative
campaign and plans for next year's
budget and building program were
discussed informally by President
Marion L. Burton at a meeting of the
University faculty yesterday after-

non in Natural Science auditorium.
President Burton pointed out that
the University had met only a 46 per
cent reduction in the building pro-
gram and a 4 per cent reduction in
the mill tax.
"I feel that the legislature has
treated us justly," he declared, "and
students can now honestly advise
high school graduates to come to the
University of Michigan. Our only dif-
ficulty now is to see to it that every
cent of the appropriation is spent
wisely.
"It is perfectly evident," he stated,
"that this University will retain its
leadership. We have a budget of more
than $13,000,000 for the next two
years. Faculty and students. should
realize this and take pride in their
University.
Senior Lit Class Dues Payable Today
Senior lit class dues will be payable
in the booth in University hall from

CAMPUS ELECTION TO BE
UNDER NEW PLANI
TIlS YEAR'

RUN

OUTSIDE GAMES
FOR FRlESHMAN
TEAMS FAVORED

MEETING WOULD GIVE
UNION S.C.A, HANDBOOK

I

Upperclass Gathering Hears Reporti
Committee to List
Traditions

of

In the last meeting of the year Sun-
day afternoon at the Union the mem-
bers of the senior and junior classes,
went on record as favoring the re-
vival of athletics between Michigan
freshmen and the freshmen of other
colleges, and accepted a resolution
that an effort be made to have the
Union and the Student council take
over the issuing of the freshman hand-
book.
It was pointed out that the revival'
of the freshman games would increase
the interest in first 'year teams and
would help bring out more material.
The Conference ruling forbids first
year teams to play any games outside
their respective schools. What action
will be taken to bring the matter be-
fore the Conference has not yet been
decided.
Want Union to Take Handbook,
In the discussion of the proposi-
tion that the Union and the :council
publish the freshman handbook, which
is at present put out by the Student
Christian association, the opinion was
expressed that it is the function of
the Union, which includes in its'mem-
bership all the men of the University,
and the council, which is the govern-
ing body of the students, to issue the
booklet. The final decision of the
meeting was that an effort be made to
have these two bodies print the hand-
book.
The report of the traditions com-
mittee was read by W. C. Palmer,
'22L, chairman of the committee, and
the sections were discussed and vot-
ed on individually: The report carried
the -following provisions:
(Continued on Page Eight)
PROGRAM NOW COMPLETE

High School Men
Debate.Tomorrow
Two championship teams of the
Michigan high school debating league
will compete for highest state honors
in Sarah Caswell Angell hall at 8
o'clock tomorrow night. There are
120 high schools in the league. Thesej
were paired for five different debates
in which they either won or lost.
There was no elimination in the pre-
liminary contests. The decision of
each judge counted one point and the
decision as a whole counted one. With
three judges there was a possibility
of winning a total of four points. For
the semi-finals the 16 highest were se-.
lected and paired for elimination.
The result is that the East Jordan
high and the West Normal high which
are competing here have . each been
through eight preliminary contests.
EVE RYTHING IS SET
kFOR.'21SWN OU
All Classes Will Assemble at 3:30
O'clock Thursday After-
noon t
COUNCIL COMPLETES PLAN$
FOR ANNAUL SENIOR MARCH
Firdl arrangements for the annual
Swing-out of senior classes, which1
will take placeat 3:30 o'clock Thurs-
day afternoon, were issued yesterday
by the Student council committee in
charge. Assembly will take place at
3:15 o'clock, as previously announced,1
the classes forming in their assigned
position in readiness for the march
to Hill auditorium at 3:30 o'clock.
The circular medallion in front of
the Library will be used as the center
of the plan for assembly, all classes
forming immediately around it. Lit
women will form on the walk leading
from the Library west to University
hall and lit men on the diagonal lead-
ing to Tappan hall. Engineers will
be assembled near the Engineering
arch, followed at a short interval by
the architects. Medics will be at the
opposite end of the diagonal from
the lit men, their point of assembly
being Waterman gymnasium. The
laws will meet outside the Law build-
ing, at the northwest end of the other
diagonal. Dents will assembly on the
walk that leads north from the Lib-
rary just west of the Chemistry build-
ing and will be followed by the
homoeops. The pharmics form to the
north of their building, on the walk
that goes east from the circle in front
of the Library.
Medallion to be Center d
The classes will group themselves
in a circle around the medallion, form-
ing lines that radiate out in all di-
rections. Tentative plans are being
made by the committee for a platform
to be erected at the center from which
to take a panorama picture of all the
classes.
The order of march will be as fol-
lows: Lit women, lit men, engineers
and architects, medics, laws, dents
and homoeops, pharmics, and gradu-
ateg. As the Varsity band starts play-
ing, the first class, the lit women,
will turn to their left and walk north
past the Natural Science building,
turning west on North University ave-
nue to the walk that leads directly
into Hill auditorium. They will then
cross and go past the Varsity band,

which will be drawn up to the east.
of the entrance, entering the center
door of the auditorium.'
To Take Individual Pictures
Upon leaving the auditorium, the
classes will march in their order
across to the walk in front of the
Natural Science building, wpst to State
street, down the diagonal to the Lib-
rary, along the other diagonal to Al-
umni Memorial hall, then east on
South University avenue past the
President's home, turning north to the
rear -of the Library, then east in the
direction of the Engineering arch to
the diagonal, and down the diagonal
to the front of the Library, where each
class will have its group picture tak-
en at the end of the march.
The speakers, as previously an-
nounced, will be the Rev. Arthur W.
Stalker, of the Methodist church, who
will give the benediction; Fred J.
Petty, president of the senior literary

ELECTION CANDIDATES
The Daily will devote next
Sunday's Supplement to the All-
campus election and the records
of all candidates will be printed
to assist the voters in naming
their choices.
Every candidate is requested
to mail to the Sunday editor of
The Daily a statenent of his col-
lege activities and his qual-
ifications for office. These state-
ments must be in not later than
Wednesday afternoon.
In those cases where candi-
dates have not yet been, named,
the men who exoect nomination
are requested to send in their
statements.
The Daily desires to have the
record of every candidate in or-
der that no partiality may be
shown, but will take no respon-
sibility if any candidate fails to
furnish his record.
SCA.PICKS NOMINEES.
fOR COMING ELECTIONS,
CANDIDA'TES SELECTED FOR OF-
FICERS FOR NEXT
YEAR
Leon E. Grubaugh, '22, and Hugh
W. Hitchcock, '22, were nominated yes-
terday for president of the, Student
Christian association for next year by
the nominating committee which at
the same time put up men for vice-
presidents to represent seven denom-
inations, and two candidates for stu-
.dent councilmen-at-large.
The names will appear on the All-
campus ballot, and will be voted upon
at the elections next Wednesday, May
11. Each voter will cast a vote on
only the nominees o his particular
denomination.
Vie-Presidents
Vice-presidents will be chosen from
the following men according to the
denominational groups:
Baptist: Amos C. Anderson, '22,
and Gale L. Wessinger, '21E. Congre-
gatonal: Brewster P. Campbell, '22,
and Arthur E. Pierpont, '22. Disciple:
William D. Ogden,.'23, and Maurice W.
Taylor, grad.
Episcopal: Thomas E. Dewey, '23,
and Frank H. Lee Jr., '22. Lutheran:
Louis M. Dyll, '22, and Leonard F.
Meilander, '22E. Methodist: A. Ross
Fox, '23, and Edward T. Ramsdell, '23.
Presbyterian: Philllips P. Elliott, '22,
and Arthur F. Heyl, '23M.
Council Nominee
For student coufieilman-at-large the
following men ere nominated: Stan-
ley Kresge, '22, and Archie D. Mac-
Donald, .22L.
The nominating committee was com-
posed of: Clarence N. Johnstone,
'21E,s Donald J. Porter, '21, Oswald
Michelmann, '22, Leon Grubaugh, '22,
and Paul W. Eaton, '21. '
PROF. BADGER TO SPEAK TO
CHEMISTRY SOCIETY TODAY

N E W B E R R Y . F R E E D B Y D E C I S I O N O s i~ I C H l F 09 O Hph T C S A T U C N T T~

15

CO-DEFENDANTS 01
ALSO RELEASED

1 ~ SENTENCES
JUDGES UNANIM
REVERSING I

Disagree, 54, on Uniawfuines
But Admit of "Gross W
construction"
(By Associated Press
Washington, May 2.-Setti
the conviction of Sen, Tru
Newberry, of Michigan, and 1
for violation of the federal
practices act, the supreme co
today that the act was uni
tional.
The court was unanimous i
ing the conviction, but divide
as to the validity of the law
Justice White and Associate
Pitney, Clark, and Brandeis
ed from the court's findings -
gress was without power to
state primaries but admitte
misconstruction" had takei
They concurred in the revers
ever, which they thought 'shc
been based- on the error of
judge's instructions to the j
McKenna Dubious
Justice McKenna while co
the majority opinion "as ap
the statute under considerat
served opinion on the questio
power of congress under
amendment, which Provides
rect election of senators, to
primaries.
Opinion was divided in th
as to the effect of the decis
future activities of the electi
mittee with regards to the
election of 1918 in which He
the Democratic candidate, opp
Newberry for the senatorshi
- Senate Action Unknoi
Senator Dillingham, - chair
the committee said th'at since
rupt practices law had beer
constitutilnal it appeared t
committee would have no fui
isdictidn.
On the other hand, Senator
chairman of the'sub-committl
has been conducting the F
berry case announced that de
decision the inquiry would t
ued to determine, he said,
elected, as well as to pass
Ford's charge of fraud. The
mittee has completed its re
votes, which gave Senator :
a majority. Action, however
been taken on the recount.

'8

"DARLING FOUR-TETTE"'
FIRST APPEARANCE
SEASON

TO MAKE
THIS

A 40 minute concert by the Varsity
band will head the acts arranged for
the spring Band Bounce which is to
be held next Thursday evening in Hill
auditorium, according to Harold P.
Lindsay, '21, manager of the band and
chairman of the committee in charge.
All, the acts have been decided upon
and they promise to be fully up to the
standards of past years. .
Phil Diamond to Give Act
The "Darling Four-tette" will make
its initial appearance this season in
a series of snappy songs which prom-
ise to hold the attention of the audi,-
ence from start to finish.
Diamond's Syncopaters are next on
the program. Phil Diamond, king of
music makers, will again appear be-
fore the public with his clever orches-
tra.
Lauver and Powers, "Old Opera
Favorites", will present their act,
"Watch Our Step", a, pleasing diver-
sion in the form of fancy soft shoe
dancing. This pair will be remember-,
ed with pleasure as one of the big,
hits of the Minstrelsy.
Program Extensive _
The band, under the direction of
Capt. Wilfred B. Wilson, will present
the following program:
Victors......... . . . ... Elbel
I
Overture "Comique"...... Keler-Bela
A Night in June ............... King
II
Cocoanut Dance .... Hermann Op. 193
Rose .... Magine, Biese and Sizemore
My Mammy .............. Donaldson
III -,
Overture "Orphans"......... Offenbach
IV
Legend of a Rose..........Reynald
Say Yoh.......... ......Eville
Humming......;Breau and Henderson

FRESHMAN WRAI
TO DEBATE

Fi

NOTICE

i

So many requests are being
received for box notices on the
front page of The Daily sthat it
have become necessary to re-
strict such announcements to
those issued by some official de-
partment of the University.
From now on all class notices'
and meeting announcements, will
be run in the What's Going On or
U-Notice column which appears
on the last pige of this paper.
Readers are requested to consult
Sthis column each day for the

Prof. W. L. Badger, of the chemistry
department, will give an address on
"The Boiling 'Points of .Salt Solutions,
Theoretical and Practical Considera-
tions," at 4:15 o'clock today in room
151 of the Chemistry building. This
is the regular, meeting of/ University
of Michigan sectjon of the American,
Chemical society.
EMPLOYERS ACCPT 44 HNOR
WEEK AND AVERT STRIKE
Chicago, May 2. -- Acceptance by
employers in many of the larger cities
of the 44 hour week in the printing
industry today appeared to have

Freshman members of the A
and Adelphi literary societi(
clash at 8 o'clock tonight in
sity Hall. The occasion is t
debate of a series of seven wl
two have held annually for :
loving 'cup offered by Delta
Rho, national honorary debat
ciety, to the one gaining four d
in the series. Both have wc
so that the 'debate tonight w
an added importance. The -
chosen for debate is: "Resole
the Philippine Islands shc
granted their immediate indep
by the United States".
The presiding officer will 1
R. D. T. Hollister, of the of
department. As representa
the Adelphi the following m
support the affirmative: Dona
Robert Hicks, and Donald Ri
Alpha Nu will up hold the,neg
the question through the follo
K. Dunn, C. E. Hodgman, anc
Owen. The judges have been
and are: Dean E. H. Kraus
college of Pharmacy, Prof. .3

class; and President Marion L. Bur
ton, whose speech will be particularly

averted a nation-wide strike in book Hildner, of the
and job printing shops, although iso- Prof. T. . Ro
lated strikes in newspaper plants and department.
job printing offices had been called to The debate is

P

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