100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 01, 1921 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,

y Sunday as a supplement to
vs section of The Michigan
must be in the hands of the
sday previous to the date of
on.
ationsaor contributions must
indication of good faith.

Seen On The
Stage=-=m Screen
(By Edwin R. Meiss)
"Way Down East," the picture of
D. W. Griffith's which has played to
record-breaking houses in the leading
theatres throughout the country, hasi
been scheduled by the Whitifey to play
in Ann Arbor next Thursday, Friday,

>r.... Joseph A. Bernstein
Assistants
kin Thomas H. Adams
away Byron Darnton
............Stewart T. Beach
.............Edwin R. Miess
fandled By
y Before It
s Into Print
y Tom Adams)
ight Editor? I want to
the sport page tomorrow

pry, but the sport page is locked.
*u will give me the article I will
nd get it inte the paper some-'
e, but I can't promise anything."
ny students have received this
er on calling the Daily office late
evening and requesting that
item be inserted in the morn-
paper. Probably a large ma-
.of them have hung up with the
g that the Night Editor's "sorry,
he page is locked" was nothing
,n excuse and that the Night Ed-
was too.lazy to try and get the
into print.
hough the machinery of The.
is by no means as complicated
at of a metropolitan paper, it is
o simple as many people believe.
a first step in the process of get-
a story into print is the getting
5 news. This end of the work is
the direction of the, City Editor.
r noon reporters report to him
re assigned certain stories about
. it is their work to get all avail-
Information. If the story hap-
to be on some "beat" (the name
to a group of news sources
are regularly covered by some
it is given to the man who is
ng that particular group of of-
If it is not, it is assigned to
special writer.
r the story is written it finds
ay to the Night Editor's desk,
3 it is carefully edited and a
ne written ove it. All stories
> they get into the paper go
gh ithe Night Editor's hands, and
ie who determines what kind o
s"' they shal have and what po-
in the paper each story shall
in the Night Editor's desk the
is sent to the .linotype machine,
the lead from which the article
rted Is'set up, line by line. After
tir e story is set up a proof is
of it and any errors which may
been made are corrected.
an all the "lead"-in other
type-for a page has been
it is placed in the forms. This
s is known as "making up." As
as a, page is umade up another
in order to avoid all chance of
is taken. This is known as a
proof. If no mistakes are founa
.' the page is rushed to the
i, which stand in readiness to
he 4,500 copies which are made
ry Daily.
Continued from Page One)
It will not be many years be-
sery morning The Daily will
in its columns all the local, na-
and international new that is
in the morning edition of the
city newspaper,-as well as all
ms of campus interest. At pres-
ie circulation and needs of ad-
er are taxing the mechanical
f producing The Daily to very
its present limit.
short, it is not too much of a
i of the imagination to think of
)lily in the future as a, great
ig school for journalism with
s for service to University and
lat can only be compared to the
jalities of the best public-spir-
orning paper. Only when the
iption list rivals in length that
metropolitan contemporary,
ts pages are read with equal in-
by "town and gown," only then
'ie Daily even be said to have
ched its ultimate standard of

and Saturday. Undoubtedly there is
a force behind this production which
exceeds that of any of its predecessors.
Griffith has abandoned, for the most
part, in this creation, the spectacular
effects which hoisted him to fame, and
turns his attention even more effect-
ively than usual to scr'een paintings,
as a result of which he has achieved
scenes worthy of an artist's pallet.
The homely beauty of his New Eng-
land farm pictures represents the
height of his accomplishment.'
But Griffith could not forego the
spectacular entirely. Although. the
greater part of the story revolves
about t~ie humble farm, still towards
the close, the girl, Lillian Gish, is
driven out into the cold of mid-winter'
and in despair attempts to drown her-
self, but faints on the ice. The floe
breaks and she is swiftly carried to-
wards the falls below, followed by her
frantic lover who leaps, like Liza,
from block to block of ice. In the
struggle for safety which takes place
on the edge of the falls, a degree of
intensity is reached which grips the
audience and holds it in terrified sus-
pense until the close of the scene.
Griffith has. rather unsuccessfully
-attempted to introduce color effects
into a part of his picture, the only
place in which it adds to the film being,
in an exquisite portrait of the heroinej
in evening gown. Much more could
be said about "Way ,Down East," but1
space forbids. The producer has in-
terjected humorous parts to offset the
heaviness of his story, which treats in
a forceful manner (though without thel
semblance of propaganda),the. ques-
tion of the double standard. No praisef
is too high for this photoplay; it isf
,one which can be enjoyed a second1
time as well as the first.
The Arcade today offers Helenee

sea entitled, "Godless Men." The plot
deals with a sea captain who because
of his wife's faithlessness has brought
up his son with the gospel, of hate. A
girl who has been rescued and who
later proves to be a daughter of the
captain's former wife, leads the son
to have his father stabbed for protect-
ing her, but the father, in a dramatic
climax manages to shoot his own son
and save the girl from harm. The pic-
ture is adapted from Ben Ames Will-
iams' Saturday Evening Post story,
"Black ,Pawl."
For the latter half of the week the
Arcade features Norma Talmadge in
a picturization of Benavente's drama,
"The Passion Flower," which played
in Ann Arbor this year on the legiti-
mate stage with Nance O'Neil in the
lead.
TTHIRTIETH YEAR'
> (Continued from Page. One)
anywhere along in the afternoon as
was the old custom. The Daily led all
other papers in this innovation.
Getting down to modern times, we
find that in March, 1920, The Daily
again took the lead of college papers
and produced the first Sunday supple-
ment "in all the land."
Facts, facts, facts all crowd to the
foreground for space in this anniver-
sary supplement, but few can be men-
tioned. Few remember the old Daily
Celebrity ball, an annual institution
given by The Daily to which all men
whom the paper deemed advisable to
invite were present. Then there is the
"Hans' Football Score Board" still
standing on Ferry field-a Daily insti-
tution. And what of the struggle ,for
existence, the struggle for space to
print its pages, and of its relation to
town newspapers-a great deal indeed,
but these things alone would take col-
umns of space.
Made Advances
Everything considered, The 'Daily
has advanced through its 30 years of
-existence, it las established a place
for itself which seems to .have a rock
foundation. It has helped mould the
lives of leaders in the world today.
And as one looks ahead, only specu-
lation can ascertain what other gen-
erations may write of us 25, 50, 100

D.

.1

GRIFFIT

HIT NEY T EAT E 3 DAYS STARTING
THURSDAY NIGHT

MATINEES

Presents

'ONE OF THE UNEXAMPLED WONDERS SF
THE 20TH CENTURY."

-ditori l Boton Herald, Nov. x
THE PRODUCER
NEW ART FORE SOMBININ. DRAMA, PAINTINI, POETRY and MUSIC
WITN A SELECTED ORCHESTRA OF SYMPNONY PLAYERS

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY

L

juiadWick in a powerful story of the years from now.

GARRICK

MATINEE EVERY DAY
25-50-75-$1
Twice Daily, 2:20 8:20
Sunday Matinee 3:00

THIS WEEK
ALL SEATS RESERVED

SPTACUAR~IrNi AND TRtLS.
ptasmotion pictures among tht ftue te, and deserves al the approbation t recelys.
lana Gibson.

Metro Present

Vincent Blasco Ibanez

4

hePOCRAE En
of the APOCALYPSE

14

"The pictured version of the Greatest Work of fiction
that came out of the world war, offers this community a glori-
ous opportunity to register its preference for films that are
worth while. Is doing a definite service and should appeal
powerfully to the upholders of the best things in life."
James Schermerhorn, Times.
S H U BE R T POP. MATINEE $1.50
DET ROT WED., 500 to
ER- NIGHTS - 50c to $2.50
This Week

(

S

THE WHIRLWIND

EDDIE

CANTOR

N. Y. Century Theatre Revue
Midnight Rounders

The patrons shrieked and raed. They had witnessed the most sensational photoplay climax that ever
aroused a cataract of emotions. Enough to raise te. hair on maa' iad and raise the maa out of his
seat."-N. Y. Herald.- -
SEATS ON SALE IONDAY AT BOX OFFICE.-MAIL ORDERS NOW

0

NAN HALPERIN
Harry Kelly, Lew Hearn
and 125 others

PRICES:

NIGHTS: Orchestra: $1.50; 2.00. Balcony: $1..00; i.50.
MATINEES: Orchestra: $1.00; $1.50. Balcony: $1.00.

Gallery: 5
Gallefy: 5

years from now, when ,The
Daily observes the semi-cen-
niversary of its founding,
ges may well be expected to
nplace.

I

N *Oving to cost, length of production and iron bound contracts, "WAY DOA
ote. EAST" )zzll neber be shohvn at less than first class theatre pric

.- _

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan