100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 27, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

)

7EATHER
ANTD COOLER
ODAY I

r 3ki r~a

4,Ia1jj

DRAY ANDi NIGHT 1
SEFRVICE'

No. 141.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27, 1921.

PRICE

NATE APPROVES
ATIONAL BUDGET;
OUP TO' HOUSE
'H BATTERED MEASURE WILL]
FINALLY PASS, IS EXPEC.T-
ATION
L REQUIRES BUREAU
MDER TREASURY DEPT-
-des For Director to be Appoint-l
ed Every Seven Years at,
$10,000 SalaryE

"Loca Professor Says Meteoric Rain
Predicied For HYid-NYay Ih Posbe

"It is quite possible that the earth?
will experience a meteoric shower
from the Pomg-Winecke comet that
appears the middle of next month,"
said Prof. W. J. Hussey, director of
the observatory, yesterday, in discuss-
ing the prediction of Prof. A. O.
Leuschner, of the astronomy depart
ment of the University of California.
In case the earth's'orbit is near that
of the approaching comet, tqhich was
first observed very faintly on April 10,.
the earth's attraction can be expect-
ed to divert some of the Mpeteoric ma-
terial in itsswake. The shower will
be more spectacular than serious,
however, according to Professor Hus-
sey, as we regularly experience such
minor showers during the months of
August and November.
Professor Leuschner, who made the
TEA9CHERS JOBS
SEURDFO.32

prediction, is a graduate of Michigan
of the class of 1888, and is an author-
ity in the field of comets and minor
planets, according to Professor Hus-
sey. He has done a great deal of in-
vestigating in the subject and has
been director of the astronomical ob-
servatory at Berkeley, California, for
more than 25 years.
OFFICALS RAS
HYIN LCUE

(By Associated Press)
Washington, April 26.- Without a
record vote, the senate late today
passed the budget bill. Brief, ebate
preceded final vote on ' he measure
which was introduced originally by
Senator McCormick, Republican, Illin-
ois, passed by both 'senate and house
of the 66th congress, vetoed by ex-
president WilsonF and then re-passed
by the house with the section found
objectionable stricken out. The sen-
ate, ,however, failed to act on the
measure after the ex-President's veto.
The measure, as passed today now
goes to the house as re-passage is
necessary on account of the change in
admiistratioi. Prompt action hag
been promised.
The bill provides for a bureau of the
budget in the treasury department to
pre are estimates of appropriations
nee ed by the various departments.
The bureau would have as its head
a director of the budget, appointed
by the President with the consent of[
the -seaate for a term of seven years
with an annual salary of $10,000.
PROF. HAYDEN ENDORSES BHLL
In :speaking of the passage of the
budget bill by the senate, Prof. J. R.
Hayden, of the political science de-
partment, characterized the move as
a step in advance.
"The bill, which was vetoed >by ex-
President Wilson because of a tech~
nicality, is now free from the feature
which was objected'to," said Professor
Hayden. "In its present Corm it sat-
isfies the cry for an administrative
bqdy that will supervise expenditures.
It' is not a perfect bill, but is the be-
ginning of a real bugetary system.
"The feature in the bill which stip-
ulates a seven year ;term for the di-
rector of the budget tends to take the
offlie -partially out of politics. Of
course, some objection may be raised
that such a term is inadvisable, on the
supposition that' an official may be
selected at some time 'who does not
prove to be the one fitted for the
position.
"As a whole the bill is a move to-
ward bet.ter government, and careful
expenditure."
Choral Ensemble
To Give Rectal
Advanced students and the choral
ensemble class of the University
School of Music will give a public re-
cital at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon at
the School of Music. The appearance
of the\ choral ensemble class, ,which
will be under the direction of four
Inembers of the class, is a new feature
of these recitals.
The programn is as follows:, ,
Sonatina ........... ...... Revel
Samuel Robinson
Thou Charming Bird (The Pearl
of Brazil) ................David
*- Esther Hollands
Concerto, No. 5, A major .....Mozart
First movement
Josephine Connable
Gavotte ..............GluckBrahma
Wilma Seedorf
Nina. ............... .Perglese
Liungidal Caro bene ...... Secchi
Ralph Sarager '
(a) Tle Old Sabre .........Offenbach
Marybelle Scarboro, Conducting
(b) Lift Thine Eyes .....Mendelssohn
Ralph Hoy, Conducting
(c) My Heart Ever Faithful ....Bach
Ruth Purvis, Conducting
(d) Night ...............Beethoven
Genevieve Alger, Conducting

LAst Senior Society Tea Today I
The Senior society will give the last
6f a series of tea dances for league
house women from 3:30 to 5:30 o'clock

Dr.i

Barker Indorsed by
fen of BathCity
University

Prominent
and

First List of, Appointments Made
Several Months Shows
Department Active

in

MEN NUMBER ONLY FOUR OUT
OF TOTAL PLACED IN SCHOOLS
Names of 32 persons who hae been
given appointments through the edu-
cational department offices were given
out yesterday by Miss Margaret Cam-
eron, secretary to the appointment
committee.
Four of these were men and the re-
mainder women. This is the first list
of appointments that has been made
public for several months although
the departemnt is continually secur-
ing positions for teachers in all
grades, according to Miss Cameron.'
A list of positions that are open is
always kept in the offices although
this is not made public. The ap-
pointees for this time are:
Neva Nelson, '21, Grant Ledge,
French and algebra; Anna*G. Linde-
mulder, '21, Grand Rapids, elementary'
schools;' Roselin Smalldon, '21, Sagi-
naw;, Frances Hazel Eppens, '22, Mar-
shall, sixth grade; Marie von Walt-
hausen, Dowagiac, French; Elizabeth
Kemp, '22, Redford, principal; Daphne
Dodds, '21, Ann Arbor; Kathryni Mich
aels, ,'21, Winnetka, Ill., fifth grade;
Cyrus H. Karraker, Grad., University
of Pennsylvania, assistant in Modern
{uropean history; John Walter Hin-
des, '21, Ferndale; Howard W. Wick-
ett, '21, Marlette, superintendent;
Frances Bailey, '21, Harbor Springs,
principal; Gladys Reineke. '21.
Greenville, Spanish and Latin; Dor-
thy Tichenor Niles, Mathematics at
juni6r high; Stella Cooper, '21, Zee-
land, botany and zoology; Marthena
Drybread, '21, Belding, French and
mathematics; Katherine R. Morrissey,
'21, Grand Ledge, English and his-
tory; Lydi Blount, '21, Charlevoix,
English; Theodore Wilson, Grad.,
Cleveland, Ohio; Helen E. Murphy,
'21, Marlette, French and Latin; Doro-
thy Hoyt, '21, St. Johns, English and.
,history; Rena E. Bailey, '21, St.
Johns, French; Blanche Crandall,
Highland Park, English; Gladys Mc-
Kenzie, '21, Royal Oak, biology and
chemistry; Gladys Turnbull, '21, St.
Johns, Latin; Murriel Wright, "21,
Grand Blanc; Alice Comfort, Detroit;
Doris Gracey, '21, Conrad Montana,
mathematics; Lavanche Rieger, Ann
Arbor, Latin and Greek; Evelyn Max-
well, Royal Oaks, Latin; Maragretta
,Fletcher, '21, Harbor Beach, French
and English; Mabel M._ Stickle, '21,
iirmingham, French.'.'
Assistant Managers Tryout Today
Freshmen who wish to try out for
assistant football manager have been
asked to be at Ferry field at 2 o'clock
today. This request has been made in
order that the men get started in the
duties that are required and be famil-
iar with the work when the season
opens in the fall.

TO SPEAK TWICE ON HEALTH
IN HILL AUDITORIUM TODAY
Unqualified indorsements of. the
power and force as a speaker of Dr.
Charles E. Barker, who speaks here
on personal hygiene at 3 o'clock this
afternoon and 8 o'clock this evening in
Hill auditorium, were given by prom-
inent men of Ann Arbor when inter-
viewed yesterday. Dr. Barker comes
here under the auspices of the Board
of Education and the Parent Teachers
association, his talk being in the na-
ture of a general health lecture rath-
er than a discussion of sex problems.
Endorsed by Mayor
Dr.* . E. Forsythe, director of the
Health service, said: "From what we
know we are very willing to endorse
his lectures, as he gives an unusually
entertaining and .instructive talk on
personal health and personal efficien-
cy," Dr. Forsythe then went on to say
that it is byspcrsonal hygiene that the
greatest advance in the prevention of
disease will be made.
George E. Lewis, mayor of Ann Ar-
bor, called his address "the most forc-
ible and instrutive that I have ever
heard", and added that Dr. Barker pre-
sents hi subject in the most refined
way possible.
L. E. Butler, superintendent of Ann
Arbor schools, added his endorsement
stating that Dr. Barker's talk is es-
pecially suited to a student audience.
Many prominent men make use of his'
system of exercises and, from his ex-
Fperience with them, Mr. Butler says
they are most beneficial.
Talks Enjoyed
Shirley W. Smith, secretaW of the
University, said that special telegrams
have been received from Rotary clubs
telling 1pm that the talks have been'
greatly enjoyed by all their members
who have heard Dr'. Barker.
In commenting upon Barker's abil-
ity Coach Fielding H. Yost declared
that the hygiene lecturer presents his'
addresses in an interesting and enter-
taining manner. "I have heard him
twice and believe it would be worth
while to listel to him again. I wish
every man in the University could be
at his lecture, for he says things that
are beneficial and instructive."
GRADUATE CLUB TO
HEAR PROF. WENLEY
a'
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, head of the
philosophy department and Prof. Al-
bert E. White, of the engineering col-
lege, will be ihe speakers at the next
smoker of the Graduate club to be held
at 7:30, Thursday -evening in rooms
"321-3. of the Michigan Union. Pro-
fessor Weney's talk will be on, "Ideas
and Professionalism," while Professor
White's subject is "Research: the
Bond Between the University and In-
dustry."
Professor White is at present di-ec-
tor of the engineering research de-
partment of the University. This de-
partment is -at the disposal of manu-
facturing companies throughout the
state and studies the problems which
confront them in their work in the
'technical field of metallurgy and
chemistry.
W. S. G. A. CONFERENCE
TO BE HELD AT WISCONSIN
. pr
Word has been received that the
1 Mid-Western conference of the Wom-
en's Self Government association will
be held at Madison, Wis., on May 5, 6,
and 7. Michigan's delegates will be
Marguerite Clark, '21, president of
Women's league, and Edna Groff, '22,
president-eect.

SPRING SPOTLIGHT
SCORES SUCCESS
Union Orciestra Makes Excellent
Showing; Quartette Makes
Big Hit
SINGING OF McCANDLES
RECEIVES HEARTY APPLAUSE
(By F.B. D.)
One thing that should go in'the lead
sentence of the story of last night's
Spring Spotlight is the fact..that the
Michigan Union orchestra is a good
orchestra the minute you put a piano
in it. The overtures played by that
group of musicians were real music
and it appears that an excellent prece-
dent has been set for' next year's
opera.
The act that went best in the vaude-
ville, if applause be any criterion, was
the quartette composed of Albert
Schirmer, '22E, Paul Wilson, '23L,
Thomas Underwood, "21, and Kemp
Keena, School of Music. Schirmer, all
rolled up in a couple of yards of black
taffeta (or was it crash?) made an im-
pressive prima donna entrance which
put the audience in a responsive mood
from the start.
Oriental Skit Good
"The Watermelon Thief", an Orien-
tal skit played by Charles Kuhn, '22,
and Carl Guske, '22, was worth while.
Despite the fact that the landlady that
sat in back of us didn't seem to gather
just what it was about and so took
occasion to tell the idiosyncracies of
the student in the third floor back to
her sympathetic neighbor, we enjoyed
that bit of thievery from beginning to
end.
The mandolin sextette was some-
thing a bit different from the usual
(Continued on Page Six)
REAMINATIONS'SHOW
PHYSICALIMPROVMEIT
A 25 per: cent improvement, was
shown in the physical condition of the
'50 or 60 men who reported for re-
examination at Waterman gymnasium
,yesterday, Acording to Dr. G. A.
May, director.
"The men showed improvement in
every way," declared Dr. May, "over
their first examination. While this re-
examination is not compulsory it is
advisable that every man interested in
his physical well-being report at the
gymnasium to be exgmined. Freshmen
should bring their old charts so that
an intelligent comparison may be
made."
These examinations are being con-
ducted between 3and 5 o'clock in the
afternoon every day this week except
Wednesday and Saturday, and are
open to any men students on the cam-
pus who desire to take them.
Although no more regular classes
are being conducted in the gymnasium
this semester, Dr. May is conducting
a special advanced class in indoor
work to which anyone is eligible. Par-
ticular attention is being paid in this
class, which meets three times a week,
to the-work required in gym instruc-
tion and playground supervision.
SPEECHES HEAD PROGRAM OF
CAMP DAVIS SMOKER TONIGHT
All former Camp Davis men' and
those men wh will attend the camp
this summer are invited to attend the
Camp Davis %moker at 7 o'clock to-

night in the upper reading. room of the
Union. " /
R. B. Alexander, '21E, is to act as
toastmaster and the "following mem-
bers of the faculty .will give talks:
Prof. C. T. Jbhnston, of the surveying
department, Prof. H." E. Riggs, of the
civil engineering depa rtment, and
Prof. Filibert Roth, of the forestry de-
partment.
Ex-Service Men "to Attend Post Meet
All ex-service men in the Univer-
sity, whether members of the Ameri-
can Legion'or not, are invited to at-
tend the meeting of the city post of
the American Legion at 8 o'clock to-
night at the Armory.
The athletic program which has
been arranged will consist of a wrest-
ling match and several boxing bouts.
The wrestling match will be between
Anthony Preketes of Ann Arbor and
Paul Cook off Chicago, and boxing
will be furnished by members of the
University Boxing "club.

E FFINGER 'LEAVES
FOR DEANS MEET
Dean John R. Effinger, of the liter-
,ary college, left the city yesterday
morning to attend the annual meeting
of the deans of colleges of liberal arts
of state universities in the Middle
West to be held April 27, 28, and 29
at the University of Nebraska at Lin-
coln, Nebraska.
The meeting is in the. form of a con-
ference to discuss various questions
involved in university administration
and educational policy. State univer-
sities represented are the universities
of North Dakota, South Dakota, Ne-
braska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Arkansas,
Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wiscon-
sin, Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio,
and Michigan.
HONOR SYSE.O
MICHIG ASSURED9
Petty Feels Action Taken by Faculty
Insures Eventual Success
of Plan
DEAN EFFINGER ENDORSES
NEW EXAMINATION SCHEME
"Eventual adoption of the honor
system throughout the literary, col-
lege is now a certainty," said Fred J.
Petty, '21, president of the senior lit-
erary class, yesterday.
"The action taken by the- faculty at#
their Monday meeting insures the
gradual adoption of the system. But
of course it is only possible to insti-
tute the honor system in a school the
size of the University of Michigan by
gradually extending it from the sen-
ior classes to the lower classes," con-
tinued Petty.!
"The faculty, in recommending thek
adoption of the honor system in -the
Junior classes, has shown that it ap-
proves of the success of the system in
last semester's examination in courses4
where seniors predominated. a
"The honor system in this Univer-
sity will place scholastic work on a
much higher plane and is a most de-]
sirable thing," said Petty.
Dean John R. Effinger heartily ap-
proved of the action taken by the fac-1
ulty.
Robert C. Angell, '21, chairman ofj
the honor committee of .the senior1
class, says: "The action taken by the]
faculty atr last Monday's meeting isj
most gratifying to all members of thel
committe and other advocates of the
system.'
IMPORTANTASENIOR
MEETING TODAY
Senior lits will meet at 4 o'clock
this afternoon in room 205 Mason hall
to discuss Swing-out plans and thej
class party scheduled for May 14.
The clas invitation committee again
warns seniors that no more com-
mencement invitations maybe ordered
after.Friday, and calls attention to the
fact that the booth in University hall
will be open to receive orders from
2 to 4 -o'clock each afternoon until
that date. Orders may also be mailed
to the committee at 823 E. Kingsley
street.
GUN AND BLADE TAKES IN
THREE HONORARY MEMBERS
Gun and Blade, the recently organ-
ized society for federal board stu-
dents, held its second meeting Monday
night at the Union. A report on the

late Chicago convention of the nation-
al organization was given and plans
for future social events were discuss-
ed.
Dr. Wahr, councilor for the federal
board, Mr. Louis Partch, local co-
ordinator, and Mr. Campbell, of Jack-
son, were taken into the society as
honorary members.
The coming summer camp was ex-
plained at the meeting and the sys-
tematizing of the district executive
body was discussed. The society will
meet again May 12.
Senior Canes Now Available
Senior engineers may obtain ,their
canes now at Wagner and'company on
State street. Arrangements have been
made with- Keyer's tailor shop on
North University avenue to furnish"
caps and gowns. Class officers are
anxious that these matters be attend-
ed to promptly as only a short time
intervenes between now and Swing-
out.

31 WOMENANO2
MEN. CHOSN O
PHI BETA KAPP
OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR '1
BE hALL, ROBBINS AND
CARROLL"
ATLANTIC" EDITOR TC
GIVE INITIATION SPEEC
II. H. Walker, Professor, and N
lie B. Goodthwate, '4, Scientist,
Also Honored
Phi Beta Kappa,' national honora
literary fraternity, elected 57 studen
of the senior literary class and t
graduates to membership at the a:
nual business meeting of the organ
zation held yesterday afternoon. Rei
istrar Arthur G. Hall was lectt
president of the chapter for the coxi
ing year; Dr. Frank E. Robbins a
sisthti professor of Greek, was ma
a member of the executive committe
and Eber M. Carroll, instructor in hi
tory, secretary-treasurer.
Sedgwick to Talk
Ellery Sedgwick, of Boston, edit
of the Atlantic Monthly, will addre
the members upon t"The Editor 1
Bay," at the annual Initiation banqu
Thursday, May 5, at the Union.
Henry H. Walker,, '93, professor a
ecclesiastical history in Chicago Th
ological -seminary, and Nellie B. Gol
thwaite, '94, scientist, of Adans, Mas
achusetts, were chosen to membershi
in the fraternity.
The fo llowing 31 'women and
men of the senior literary class wer
elected:
Alice Beckham, Velda Bogert, Ge
aldine *Brasie, Lois Brooks, Dor
Gracey, Rose Gutterman, Caroly
Hayes, Maud Hindman, Emma
cobs, Alice Johnson, Anna Kent, v'
Lawrence, Julia Lockwood, Hele
Master, .Anne Mitchell, Marcel]
Moon, Elinor Mullett, Neva Nelso:
Dessca Palmeilee, Gladys Reneck
Marguerite Rochat, Elizabeth Robert
Margaret Rottschaefer, Irene Saubl
Martha Seeley, 'Katrina Scherme:
horn, Clara Sharpe; Mildred' Sherma
Gladys Turnbull, Nora Wilson, Murii
Wright.
Twenty-Six Men
R. C. Angell, K. M. Beierlein, J
Bond, F. A. Bradford, B. H. Bronso:
Laverne Burchfield, W. S. Butte
field, C. M. Campbell, N. E. Cook, L. I
Crippen, Joseph Freedman, L. lY
Gould, Abraham Herman, W. E
Howe, A. C. Jaeobs, C. A. Madiso
Perry Mason, A. V. McPhee, S. F
Rosenthal, Simon Shetzer, D. A. Wa t
H. L. Weiss, E. E. Wieman, L. I
Woodruff, Joseph Wruble, and F. 1
Wynn.~

nDa erFeatu
drench Produc

Four dances which are reputed to 1
both fancifuland elaborate in the
presentation are interwoven as pa'
of the plot of "Le Bourgeois Genti
homnie", the comedy ballet by Jea
Bajitiste Moliere to be given by mem
hers of the Cercle Francais at
o'clock tomorrow evening in Sara
Caswell Angell hall.
The first dance on the program is
seventeenth. century French minue
This is followed by a cook's dance, ai
then a dance participated in by cha
acters in the garb of tailois. Accot
panied by an elaborate and amusin
ceremony in 'which all characters a
dressed as Turks, an oriental dance
introduced towards the end of tJ
play.
The following men and women tak
part in all'of the dances: Marjorie
Kerr, '24, Beulah Brown, '21, Jeannet
Palmer, '23, Edelaine Roden, '22, E
ward F. Moore, '21E,, John C. Fros
'22, and Gordon Loud, '22.
Tickets for the production are
sale at the book stores. They are pri
ed at 50 and 75 cents, and $1. Ass
ciate members of the Cercle Franca
are allowed 50 cents on the price
a ticket on presentation of their men
hershin card.

STUDENT COUNCIL

The Student council will hold
an important meeting at 7:15
o'clock tonight in the Union.
Plans for Swing-out, Cap night,
Spring games, and the All-cam-
pus election will' be discussed.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan