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April 24, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

II 1J..,i Vltl.nlV1- 1rLJ. L tAl" lI

I ...

'een On The,

A

age - Screen'

(By Edwin I. Meiss)
The critic's job is dull to do, and
we'll try a rhyme or two to add some
n and spark; in "Prisoners of Love"
lay Miss Betty Compson leads the
iy as featured at the Arc.
rhe dangers that confront a maid
town alone, are well portrayed, al-
)ugh they overworked her past;
ss Compson's acting's very good;
r leading man's as stiff as wood;
ey have a fine supporting cast.
Another story like the last, the
antom of a purple past, unto the
Li has clung; it's awfully hard in
yme to mete the star's name out
d keep the beat, viz: Clara Kimball
ung.

In "Hush" this lady's at her best,
though not much better than the rest,,
the heights she seldom mounts; her
poise is fine, and yet, you see, her
face lacks personality, and that's the
thing which counts. She plays the
fearful newlywed who hasn't told her
husband all; a former friend keeps
her in dread by paying her a black-
mail call. At times the action tends
to pall.
The mid-week films are good at both
the shows-Majestic plays "The Oath,"
an R. A. Walsh production; the all-
star cast deserves its name, the plot
is not as usual lame, but one of fine
construction.
A man and wife swear to retain the
secret of their wedding vow; this
proves to be a tragic bane soon after
in a murder row. Photography is ex-
cellent; see this one, you'll be glad
you went.
On Wednesday the Arcade presents
some new Mack Sennett reel nonsense,
"A Small Town Idol" is the name; Ben

Turpin casts a wicked glance; the
usual bathing suits enhance this story
of a rural flame. Ben ride the horses
to success, town villain cooks dis-
graceful mess, and Bennie then skips
town; he takes a movie double part,J
becomes a hero from the start, they[
cannot keep him down. The show's a
good one in its way for those who like
the cream-pie play.
Detroit has booked a splendid week;
if in the big town surely seek, the pic-
ture of Ibanez's book, the Garrick is
the place to look. Schubert-Detroit
boasts lots of girls, a pretty peppy
music whirl; the "Midnight Rounders,"
as you read, has Eddie Cantor in the
lead.
WHAT'S YOUR 101A ON
THAT "MICHIGAN LINE"

the one mentioned above. This is a
simple utilization of a line, yet in a
majority of instances covers a multi-
tude of faulty answers so well-that the
student, who slept or read or corre-
sponded through the entire course,
gets a good grade.
Therefore is not a line a necessary
adjunct to the student's social and
educational life? It should not be con-
demned but cultivattd for it cannot be
doubted that a line is as great a bene-
fit elsewhere as well as here. They
are a means to an end-results-and
"dynamic America demands results."
Dan t Censor Our
ovies, Cry4

SOME STEAL GOLD AND JEWELS,
BUT THIS THIEF CLIPS HAIR
Omaha, Neb.--Authorities here are
anxious to apprehend a man who has
been clipping the braids of hair from
young girls.
Several complaints of the operations
of the thief have reached the police
during the past few weeks. One girl
was on her way to take a music lesson
when the robber clipped off her hair

and escaped.
The same man is supposed to have
been responsible for a fruitless at-
tempt to steal the hair from another
young girl in the residence of her
parents. He was frightened away,
however, by the girl's sister.
Two theories regarding the thefts
are advanced. One is that the robber
is demented, and the other is that he
has been stealing the hair to sell.,

TODAY'S CHURCH SERVICES

M...

Why are you so Insistent?

Because

I

f. . esimer S

2leefsteak

(Continued from Page One)
from vaudeville or light humor maga-
zines; others are made by hopelessly
warping correct pronunciations or
sentence structures. When this can
be done successfully, social favor ac-
companies.
"Lineless" One Toils
In addition to the social, there is an
educational aspect of university life'
on which the right part of an all-em-
bracing line has an obvious effect.
Some might have given this phase the
preference, but I am writing of the
average Michigan student. The "line-'
less" student has to toil almost un-
ceasingly to get a C-a grade insig-
nificant to time and effort expended,
while some of his fellows, adept in the
art of bluffing and tl e manufacture of
a wholesale store of excuses, packed
in flattery, get A's and B's. The airing
of lines during examinations rarely
fails to bring results. If one of the
questions runs something in this man-
ner: "What benefits have you derived
from this course?" the writer of the
examination profusely pens his pro-
found appreciation of the course, i s
merits, and heartily recommends it to
th~e campus at large. This makes a
difference in his grade, the degree of
difference depending on the gullibility
of the instructor. Even if the question
is not asked some think it expedient to
add a paragraph of similar nature to

Dinners are so Hard

Lansing, Mich.-The Strom motion
picture censorship bill, that came up
on general orders in the senate for
consideration by committee of the
whole last Friday, was deluged with,
petitions protesting more or less force-
fully and numerously against its pas-
sage.
Every member of the upper house
exceptSenator Aaron Amen of Remus,
and Senator Thomas R. McNaughtonj
of Ada,.had received protests against'
the censorship of the "movies" and
they all presented them at once at the
beginning of Thursday afternoon's
session.
Between 35,000 and 40,000 signatures
were attached to the various docu-
ments, which filled the arms of the
reading clerk's assistant. The largest
single petition was presented through
Senator Arthur Wood of Detroit, and
contained 6,037 names. Senator W. J.
Hayes of Grosse Pointe sent up the
next largest, containing 4,039 signa-
tures, and Senator G. B. Forrester of.
Seckerville turned in the smallest,
lwith 73.
FIRST CHURCH OF C1JRIST,
SCIENTIST
Church Edice, 409 S. Division
Sunday services at 10:30 A. M.
The subject will be: "Proba-
tion After Death." Testimonial
meeting Wednesday evening at
' 7:30. A cordial invitation is ex-
tended to all. Sunday School at
11:45 A. M., to which pupils un-
der 20 years -may be admitted.
A public reading room, 236 Nick-
els Arcade, is open daily, except
t Sundays and holidays, from 12
to 5 o'clock.
CHURCH OF CHRIST
DISCIPLES

UNITARIAN CHURCH
State and Huron Sts.
SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister
Sunday, April 24, 1921
10:40 A. M.-"The Spirit of Fra-
ternity." The fraternal or-
ders possess something which
we need to possess in church-
es, and as widely as possible.
5:30 P. M.-Weather permitting,
there will be an outdoor so-
cial hour and meeting with
discussion led by three mem-
bers. In case of rain, meet-
ings at the church as usual.
A Cordial Welcome to All!
FIRST
BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St., Below State
J. M. WELLS, MINISTER
321 East Ann Street

Cor. Catherine and Division StS.
Rev. henry Tatlock, D.D., Rector
Rev. Charles T. Webb, Curate

I

,- to Equal

7:35 A. M.-Holy Communion.
10:30 A.M. - Morning Prayer
and Sermon by the Rector,
"The Mark of a Profession:
an Address to Students."
4:30 P. M.-Evening Service and
Address by the Curate.
ANN ARBOR
BIBLE CHAIR

SHAILER MATHEWS
of the University of Chicago,
will speak Sunday, April 24,
10:30 A. M.
"Manufactured Goods"
7:30 P. M.
"The Democracy of Jesus"
Dr. Mathews is the Dean of
the Divinity School of the Uni-
versity of Chicago, and author
of "The Social Teaching of Je-
sus," "The French Revolution"
and other books.

Headquarters in Lane Hall.
Classes meet in the "Upper
Room."
Upper Room Bible Class Sat-
urday evenings. University
Men's Bible Class Sunday
morning.
Ask for printed circular an-
nouncing six courses.
Read the Upper Room Bulletin.
THOMAS M. IDEN,
Instructor.

U.

I

Opposite D. U. R. Station
Just Above Rae Theatre

I

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WJIIE~ETEH

OVERTURE - SUPPE
Morning, Noon and Even-
ing in Vienna
SELECTION - BIZET
LArlesiena-Suit de Concert
In Four Parts

WlE1 1

III

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

DR. W. A. GANFIELD

President of Center College,' Ky.,
speaks at 10:30

SUNDAY

- MONDAY

- TUESDAY

One of the ten best photoplays produced during 1920-1921

12:00 M. "Jacob and Esau"-Prof. Henderson's Class for Young
People.

South University Ave.

6:00 P. M. Social Half-Hour.

{_-

F. P. ARTHUR, Pastor
MAURICE TAYLOR, Supt.
9:30 A. M.-Bible School.
10:30 A. M. - Morning Service.
Subject: "The American Re-
formers: 0. Kelly, Abner
Jones, Barton W. Stone, Chan-
ding, Alexander Campbell."
6:30 P. M.-Christian Endeavor.
7:30 P. M. - "Evening Service.
Subject: "What is Christian-
ity ?"
Classes for Students

6:30 P. M. Dr. W. B. Shirey gives an illustrated talk before the
Young People's meeting.

-1

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
REV. ARTHUR W. STALRER, D.D.. Pastor
MISS ELLEN W. MOORE, Student Director
Sunday, April 24, 1921

it

TRINITY

CH

LUTHERAN-
URCH
nd William St.
ar morning serv-
e.avL Wallick the ""

9:30 A. M. "Jesus' Principles of Jesus," Bible Class, Mr. Clair
Searles, Leader.
10:30 A. M. "Friendship and Christianity," Pastor's subject.
12:00 M. Four Student Bible Classes. Lane Hall.
6:00 P. M. Social Half-Hour for the Young People.
6:30 P. M.-Wesleyan Guild Devotional Meeting. Mr. Leroy N.
Leader.
7:30 P. M. "What Does Society Owe to the Child P" Miss Je
Roger, Wesleyan Guild Lecture.

if er,
essie

Fifth Ave. a

Special Music: "Meditation" (Massenet), Miss Struble and Mr. Brooks;
"Benedictus" (Tours), the Chorus; "Hail, dear Conqueror"
(James), the Chorus; "Break Diviner Light" (Allitson), Mr. and
Mrs. Wheeler; "Dimittis" (Gretchaninof), the Chorus; "Evening
Hymn" (Rheinberger), the Quartette.
A SPECIAL INVITATION IS EXTENDED TO THE STUDENTS

At the regul
in t. 10 T,

ice aL 1:,j Rev . i, u
Lutheran student pastor will be

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the preacf
be a fra
Sunday qu
Sunday

her. The sermon will.;
nk discussion of the
uestion.
School at 11:30. °
If-IIIII------I111H--If1111

MAURICE TOURNEUR
presents

THl

LATO Tq A
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=!uu[[tttnntttuttnnt rrrrnrlilltu[ ili f
ZION LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Fifth I Ave. and Washington St. -
REV. E. C. STELLHORN,
Pastor
"If Christ had not died, and' so
purchased redemption for His
2people, He would have no case
at heaven's court. Surely then
= the central theme of an ideal
gospel ministry is Christ cruci-
fled."
10:30 A. M.-"Error's Terrible
E Effects."
7:30 P. M.-"Jesus Our Attor-
ney."
Both services English.
L # t [ I t ti t"tt[[[tll i [ [l t

Iw

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

fn

At the ten-thirty service the minister will, discuss the
present wage situation in Ann Arbor, with the topic:

"THE POT AND THE KETTLE."

The Wuerth Mianagement assures its patrons that no better
photoplay has eber been brought to Ann 9irbor. Critics
habe characterized it as a permanent photoplay !classic.
A .trIcally truthful version of this
world-known story

Doors open at 10, and close at 10:35.

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