100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 24, 1921 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

UNDAY

'URE

SECTION

F i A 1

IN

vT I

ATUREE
THEATRES
MUSIC
LITERARY

l e irl i ttrt til

SEFITO
TWO

I

A.

VOL. XXXI. No. 139.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 1921

PRICE FIVE

Program

Filled

For

Remaining

Day

Jig events Loom

As'

Year Closes

BASEBALL, ELECTION, SWING OUT, CLASS GAMES, MAY FESTIVAL
AND COMMENCEMENT TO HOLD CAMPUS INTEREST
AS SEMESTER ENDS
Upon returning to Ann Arbor at the close of the spring vacation those
eight thousand and more individuals who compose the student body, faced
the realization that they were coming into the straight-away for the last
stretch of the school year. At the end of the stretch will be the day whenc
the grave old senior receives his diploma and bids his alma mater farewell,
and the day when the weary undergraduate turns in his last bluebook and
starts homeward.
The intervening time will be filled with a variety of events, some of the
most interesting of which will be the traditional ceremonies incident to the
graduation of the senior class and the passing of the freshman class to the
rank of sophomores.
In athletics, attention will be focused on the baseball series on Ferry
field and on the track program. The baseball schedule calls for 10 games at
home, the first of which was played with Purdue yesterday. Other games
will follbw at short intervals until the
final encounter with Waseda on June United States, will deliver the com-
29. The big day of the track season mencement address which will bring
will be May 21, when Chicago meets to a close the University careers of
Michigan here. some 1,200 students and mark the end
The outstanding event in musical of the academic year of 1920-21.
circles, of course, will be the May
festival, from May 18 to 21, which is
of unusual interest this year in that
it is the last festival which will be
given under the personal supervision
of Dr. Albert A. Stanley as head of WHERE FINES GO
the School of Music. Dr. Stanley's 'H R F E
resignation was turned in some time
ago to become effective at the end of ROOM NICKNAMES
this year. Aprogram of characteristic _
1excellence has been arranged for this
year's festival, and some of Dr. Stan- (By Russell Raymond)
ley's own' compositions will be given. Every student who has kept a li-
Swing Out in may brary book out too long and has had
Early in May will come the annual to pay toll at the high desk,- has no
senior swing out, Michian's oldest doubt wondered what became of his
custom, which was resumed last year dad's hard-earned money. For the
after not having been observed during benefit of the regular customers we
the war period. The seniors, dressed are permitted to say that these nickels
in cap and gown, will make their usual and dimes (and sometimes larger
promenade across the campus before coins) go into the general library
the admiring and somewhat envious fund, under the tender care.of Robett
eyes of the rest of the student body. A. Campbell, treasurer of the Univer-
And the day will not be complete if sity. According to library employes
the senior laws and senior engineers the money taken in from overdue
do not stage their battle over the re- books averages about fifty dollars a
fusal of the former to go through the month so there are evidently some
arch of t e "tin shop." students who are doing their share to
About 'the same time the political make the library a success.
pot will begin to boil and nominations The library staff is nothing if not
will be in order for all the campus original. To each of the main rooms
positions to which the officers are used by the public (the stacks or
elected by student vote. Then the elec- "boneyard"must be excepted) has been
tion and quiet upon the campus once applied a nickname descriptive of its
more. purpose. Thus, the lower study hall,
Next will come the annual~tug of where the unshaved Lothario uncere-
war and the spring games between the moniously leaves his fair companion
freshmen and sophomores. The only while he telephones for tickets, is
unfortunate part about the tug of war dubbed the "check-room."
is that the Huron river does not run The periodical room, as the Univer-
through the campus, and the spec- sity catalogue calls it, is known as the
tators have to put out a little energy "trysting place." Doesn't that remind
in order to see one of the contesting you of Spring? It is said that the
teams dragged through the river. All owner of a prominent matrimonial
rivalry between the two classes will club has tried for several years to se-
be put aside after cap night in Sleepy cure a lease upon this part of the
Hollow, at which time the men of '24 building.
will burn their pots and be known no' The history reading room, to the rear
longer as "frosh." of the trysting place, rejoices in the
Honor Societies on Trail cognomen of "summer resort," due to
Michigamua will be on the trail its popularity with the swains attend-
some tine near the end of May and ing summer school. It is interesting
new palefaces will be then taken with- from the biological point of view as
in the tribe. Almost all. the other being the only place known where
honor societies, class, professional, cabbages can be cultivated indoors.
scholastic, scientific, and others, will The Medical reading room has been
pick new members before the end of sometimes referred to as the "lab," but
the year. as yet the staff has never been able
Memorial day, the last Monday in to devise a suitable nickname for the
May, seems to be about the last chance huge general reading room.
to beat the college game, as it is the

SEEN IN NONE OF THE SCENES
r 1t1111111I 11111111t111111111111I11U~111I111111111111111111
r -
/:
- a
- :..-. . .
- - ..'- '.. .-.
4 t
r t-
-- ...,;:" ..: f - L
- r.
- -
r : r
- 9 *
- -a
/r
- r
_ t. t}{::;:i. " .................... . -.:: . .:1' t
S-
- ;
r .:. :. : .. . .t.. ......::...: :F :=.
- ....*.... ..:: t
-Photos by Dey.
Infornially, we have hiere some of the reasons for the huge success of "Top 0' th' Moruin'." Most of these
pictiares -wiere never intended for publication, bat they wu e too good to pass up.
lillllilliliillilit illilillllililllliltillKawilii

l
t
3
i
T
i
i
a
3
tM1
L

Lver Thin
About Your
Clever 'Limze
HERE'S AN ANALYSIS OF Wr
IT MEANS AT UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
Editor's Note
That much discussed ability wi
most people, it is said, possess eil
to their advantage or disadvantag
an all important thing here at M
gan, says the writer of the article
sented here. She analyzes the
tures of "The Michigan Line."
is your opinion of that all impori
thing?
(By Thelma Smith)
There are lines of divers kinds, 1
imaginary and real. To be explic:
make mention of a few. There
army lines, demarkation lines, clo
lines, fishing lines, lines of work
lines of talk. I need not say that
line in the limelight, the promil
line at Michigan, is that of conve
tion
It is difficult to define such a
because of the various conception
the campus of just what it should
I would say, judging from exten
observation and personal experi
(I, too, am subject to the wiles
line) that it is a certain styleof
versation consisting of a curious
ture of politenesstsuavity and cle
ness, adaptable to any condition
situation, and capable of produ
successful results. With some it is
born; their line is original. Ot
less fortunate acquire this helpfu
tribute only after much conscios
fort.. They ape the lines of ot
which they judge eecialy levei
study the latest humor books and i
azines persistently.
Everybody Has Line
No one is entirely devoid of a
professors and students alike use
a varying extent. A good conv
tional line is a fairy who with
grace and sprightly cleverness,
a coveted place of esteem in the b
of the instructor for the student w
only efficiency lies in the art of 1
ing. Again it is a great aid to th
structor. Through its power stu
are persuaded that they are purs
the most beneficial course in the e
curriculum; in reality it may be
and more or less worthless. It pa
the irate knowledge-seeker whei
gets a C or D instead of the exp
A or B, or when he fails to recei
thesis promised for four conseci
weeks by some laggard instru
when said thesis may benefit in a
ent course or bring needed final
aid when disposed of to some co
ferer.
There are degrees of perfectio
the campus lines. Their succes
judged by their ability "to get A
big," as the slang phrase goes.
is, a line must be adequate to co
the idea that you are an 'exceed]
clever and competent person.
falls short of this mark it is faulty
if it is overdone its effect will be
through its conspicuousness.
Then a feeble line bodes ill fo
possessor, for it has to serve a
purpose. First, he or she will :
social failure. This probably woul
most clearly exemplified by the s
city of social. invitations and "di
with the opposite sex. This unh
individual is proclaimed dull and i
lessly tiring. Clever persons
sought for their lines, almost i:

pensable attributes to popula
These consist of bizarre express
I can think of no other word w
describes them as vividly and a
rately as bizarre, for truly they
odd and different. Some are gath
(Cohtinued on Page Four)

J
7
a
I
)
e
r
e
r
S
e
;.
t
e
e

IIIIIIIIilflltllllillllll lOIIIIIIIiIIlII16IIIIiIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIpIlIII IlI1MIUI11IIlIIIIIIIIiIIIIIIIIIIlI11I1II11t1IIIlII1111II1Il1 IIIIIIIIIIIIIIUII IIIII
.:
-W -W
-
w" m EE IGAN Wl THE OPERA o
I N G 'a Ar
e
IIIIIIIIIIIIIEIieIiIIIIIIIIiIIII IIIIIIIIIIOIISIIIiIlII11IlIIIIIIII II11I111IlIIlIIIIIIt11I11IIiI IIIt IlIf1I1SI11II1t11 IIIIIIIIIiti[IIIIIIII 1iC11IIhNtI1i

(By Chesser M. Campbell)
A Michigan Union opera tour cannot
be compared to any other form of stu-
dent jaunt but p'pera trips vary little
from year to year. History always
repeats itself lut in the repeating
there is usually a kick or two left
which makes the trip worth while.
"Top O' th' Mornin' " carried the
usual number of heart-breakers and
terpsichore artists-and also the usual
crew of practical jokers and souvenir
collectors. Few of the members of the
company of about 100 that made the
trip regretted spending the spring va-
cation touring Michigan, although one
lost a beautiful collegiate head of hair
and another ruined his arches.
Stars Really Shine
Probably no organization is so honey-
combed with social distinction and
barriers as a Michigan Union opera.
No time is lost in putting each mem-
ber of the troupe into his proper place
which forms his caste throughout the
trip and no wavering from the position
is tolerated. Relief may only be se-
cured by advancing from the chorus to
the cast or from assistant to the chair-
manship of a committee-the orches-
tra is forever branded as such. One
car is devoted to the high moguls-

the cast and the chairmen of the com-
mittees-and sometimes some of theseI
may secure staterooms (if they are
old timers). The chorus and orchestra
occupy the other cars with the assist-
ant committeemen sprinkled in wher-
ever there is room.
,The chairman of "Top O' th' Mornin"
met his first trouble when the leading
woman (a former chorus girl) de-
manded a stateroom or nothing, but
luckily the Pullman car was provided
with two staterooms so that both
leading woman and the chairman of
the opera could be accommodated, put-
ting Molly, the maid-, and the leading
man in for good measure to avoid fur-
ther complications.
Battle Creek was the first stopping
point. After visits to the Post theater,
the Post Tavern, the Post plant, and
the Post-office, dinner was eaten at the
Elks lodge. Following the perform-
ance a dance was given at the Elks
where the old timers had a chance to
renew acquaintance with friends of
1920 and the newcomers were initiated
into the catch-as-catch-can and now-
you-tag-me opera dance for which all
the high school girls (and others) had
been looking forward to for moths.
After the local orchestra had run

down and the younger set taken home
by parents or "steadies," Michigan
Volunteers supplied the music as long
as any cared to dance.
Got the Jackson Blues
Jackson was probably the bluest
point on the trip with two perform-
ances and a snow st'orm to cope with.
In addition the after-the-show dance
was forced to close at 12 o'clock sharp
because, as one chaperone stated-
"that is the rule at Ann Arbor, and. I
am sure the University authorities
would not want the boys kept up
longer when away from the University
than when they are under their super-
vision." A few unappreciated stars
were discovered in Jackson; chief
among which was the\"Fairy Queen"
whose graceful interpretation of a
fairy brought thunderous applause and
an avalanche of demands for pic-
tures. The "Professor" also came into
his own with the audience when he
rendered a touching ditty composed
upon the streets of Detroit. From
then on it became a battle between
Rosenthal and Forsythe for laurels,
Rosenthal reaching the apex of per-
fection in Flint as the result of re-
ceiving a string of cold dogs following
(Continued on Page Three)

only legal holiday before the semester
is over.
Then the latter part of June will
come the exercises of commencement
week. The baccalaureate address will
be given on Sunday, June 26.t
Class day exercises and alumni days
will be on June 27, 28, and 29. And
on June 30 Sir Auckland Campbell
Geddes, British ambassador to the

WOULD GIVE INTRODUCERS OF
BILLS CHANCE TO DEFEND THEM
Lansing, Mich.-Rep. George Welsh
of Grand Rapids, has introduced a res-
olution in the house to prohibit com-
mittees from reporting out bills un-
favorable without first giving the in-
troducer of the measure a chance to
be heard.

MacGregor

Golf

Clubs

and'

Balls

G

A

4
n

A

M

I Both Ends Diesonal Wadk

t

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan