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October 19, 1920 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-10-19

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Volume I TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1920.
Meeting of the University Forum:
There will be a meeting of the University Forum Friday, Oct. 22, at 8
o'clock at the Michigan Union, Room 90.
1. Election of Officers.
2. Discussion of the topic: Democratization of Departmental Organiza-
tion. R. W. SELLARS, Secretary.
Central League Debates:
Literary society preliminaries for the Central League Debates must be
completed on or before Saturday evening, Oct. 30. All members of societies
who wish to compete for places on the teams must do so through the society
try-outs. Any who are not members may compete in aspecial try-out to be
arranged for Saturday, Oct. ^0. Application for this try-out must be filed
with the undersigned not later than Wednesday, Oct. 27. The first squad
elimination contest will be held Saturday, Nov. 6.
RAY K. IMMEL,
Intercollegiate Contest Director.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
Members of the Teaching Staff:
It is essential that The Michigan Daily be supplied at once with the office
address of each person teaching a University class, including Teaching Fel-
lows and Assistants. Give the number of the, room and name of the building
where you will be able to see the Daily Official Bulletin before classes begin
each day. Only in case a person has no office will the Daily be delivered to
his residence address. Fill out the following form and send it to The.Mich-
igan Daily office today. Give your office address if you have one.
O. L. BUHR,
Assistant to the President.
Name........................................................
Office Address.................................................
There will be a rehearsal of the Choral Union Tuesday evening, Oct. 19,
at 7 p. m. at the School of Music. All members will please report at that
time. I will meet applicants for admission to the chorus Tuesdays and
Thursdays, 3:30 to 5 p. m., Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 4 to 5:30, at
the School of Music.
ALBERT A. STANLEY, Director.
Economics, Course 1:
The examination for students who were absent from the final in June
will be held Saturday, Oct. 23, at 9 a. m. in Room 202 of the Economics Build-
ing. Candidates must present a slip from the Registrar giving them permis-
sion to take the examination.
Economics 31a:
It is requested that students enrolled in Economics 31a (Marketing
Problems) meet in Room 204 Economics Building Tuesday, Oct. 19, at 2
p. m. C. E. GRIFFIN.
English 22, English 33:
Hereafter Dr. Moore's class in Contemporary Drama (English 22) will
meet in Room 206 University Hall; and Dr. Raymond's class in Victorian
Prose (English 33) will meet in Room 206 Tappan Hall.
JOHN ROBERT MOORE.
WILLIAM 0. RAYMOND.
Research Club, University of Michigan:
The first meeting of the Research Club for the academic year 1920-
1921 will be held at 8 p. m. Wednesday evening, Oct. 20, 1920, in the His-
tological'Laboratory.
(The Council will meet at 7:30.)
Program:
Annual election of officers.
Campbell Bonner, The rights of women over suppliants and cap-
tives: a study in ancient law.
H. H. BARTLETT, Secretary.
Engineering English:
All students in the Colleges of Engineering and Architecture condi-
tioned last semester in English 1 or 2 will meet Mr. C. N. Wenger Tuesday
at 5 p. m. in Room 28 for the purpose of organizing a section in English 1x
J. RALEIGH NELSON.
Engineering Students:
Engineering students interested in research in concrete and steel may
receive information in regard to specific problems for which University
credit is given in Engineering Mechanics 7, by calling at New Engineering
Building, Room 102, Monday, Wednesday or Friday from 2 to 5.
F. N. MENEFEE.
University women are expected to attend the formal opening meeting of
the Women's League at 3:45 o'clock this afternoon in Hill auditorium. Presi-
dent Burton will give an address, which will be followed by a reception in
Barbour gymnasium.

MARGUERITE CLARK,
President Women's League.

WHA'S GOING ON
TUESDAY
3:00-Senior lits meet in room 205,
Mason hall for class elections.
4:00-Mt. Clemens club meets at
Union. Students from Mt. Clemens
and vicinity are requested to at-
tend.
4:00-Junior lits meet in room 205,
Mason hall for class elections.
4:00-Editorial staff of Michiganen-
sian meets at Press building.
5:00-Junior engineers meet in room
348, Engineering building, for class
elections.
6 :00-Quarterdeck dinner at the Un-
. .
ion.
6:30- First meeting of Bible class
studying the Gospel of St. John in
Upper Room, Lane hall.
7:00- Union orchestra rehearsal in
the Assemblyroom at the Union.
7:00-A. S. M. E. student section
meets in room 229 of the Engineer-
ing building for business meeting.
7:00 - Choral union rehearsal at
School of Music.
7:15-Sphinx meeting in room 306 of
Union.
7:15 - Erie, Pa., students meet in
room 304, Union.
7:15- t% S. Marine club meets in
room 302, Union.
8:00-Ossip Gabrilwitsch opens Mat-
inee Musicale concert course with
all Chopin piano program at Patten-
gill auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
11:00 A. M.-Fr'esh engineers meet in
University Hall for class elections.
3:00-Soyhomore lits meet in room
205, Mason hall for class elections.
5:00 - Sopohomore enginers meet in
room 348, Engineering building for
class elections.
7:30Forestry club smoker in room 214,
Natural Science building.
7:30-Pontiac club meets in room 302,
Union.
7:30-R 0. T. C. club meets in Natur-
al Science auditorium. Meeting
open to all, '24 men especially in-
vited.
7:30- Western club meets in Lane
hall. All students from the West
invited.
7:15-Student council meeting in room
306 of Union.
7:15--Meetng of Intercollegiate Zion-
ist society in Lane hall to discuss
plans for year.
U-NOTICES
All voters from Indiana and Iowa
call at Republican club, 222 Nickels'
Arcade between three and four
Tuesday to vote.
The Ron. Julius Kahn, of California,
will speak to a Republican mass
meeting at 7:30 Wednesday at the
Whitney theater.
The following men are requested to
report at 4:30 this afternoon at
South Ferry field in order to pick
the South African soccer team: Van
Reenan, V. D. Meulen, Broderyk,
Merry, Rorich, Kruger, Samuels, G.
Dyason, C. D. Dyason, Levinson,
deKlerl, Mangold, Theunissen,
Wium, Hofmann, Rein.
SWEDISH GEOLOGIST, BARON
DE GEER, VISITS ANN ARBOR
(Continued from Page 1)
ing over the ground to see if it will
be favorable to the type of work car-
ried on in Sweden, which in this par-
ticular instance is determining the
time at which the last glacier cov-
ered this section of the continent.
Besides his work of studying geo-

logical time the baron has done much
work around the North Pole, on the
shores of oceans, and in studying gla-
ciers. He has been aided in his in-
vestigation by his students, whom he
has used for much of his work. Some
time in November the baron will
speak to geology students in the Nat-
ural Science auditorium, the date and
subject will be announced later.
Included in the party accompanying
the baron from Sweden are his wife,
the Baroness De Geer, and Dr. An-
tevs, the latter being like Baron De
Geer, a professor at the University of
Stockholm.
LIBRARY PRESENTED WITH
BOOKS BY DUTCH GOVERNMENT
More than 40 volumes by the Roy-
al Historical commission of Holland
on Dutch medieval history and his-
tory of a later date were presented to
the Library last summer by the
Dutch minister of public instruction.
The volumes are important as
sources of Dutch history and contain
papers about Dutch affairs in the
archievs of Italy, France, and Eng-
land. The Dutch government has al-
so promised to send the Library fu-
ture issues as they come out.
The gift was made possible through
the efforts of Mr. Henry S. Lucas of
the History department, who studied
in Holland last year.

OVERSEAS CLUB PLANS PARADE
FOR ARMISTICE DAY, NOV. 11
Banquet Will be Given by Members
at Michigan Union; Dance
at Armory
Plans for a parade to take place
Nov. 11 were formulated by the Over-
seas club at its first meeting of this
semester in the Union last evening.
The men wish to have Armistice Day
celebrated and believe this is a suit-:
able way to do it. The club will be
backed by all of the military Organiza-
tions in Ann Arbor in order to make
the day a success.
A discussion was held on the pro-
posed merger of the Overseas club
with the Veterans of Foreign Wars,
but no definite action was taken.
Strong comment was made in regards
to the failure of the flag-raising cere-
monies before the Case and M. A. C.
games. A tradition was adopted by
the University last year that before
every game the flag should be raised
on the memorial flagpole and the
Star Spangled Banner be played by
the band. A committee was appointed
to see that this tradition be observ-
ed in the future. There will be a
banquet at 6 o'clock, Nov. 11, at the
Union for all Overseas men, and this
will be followed by a dance at the
Armory. Several new men attended
the meeting.
MRS. BOOTH TELLS ABOUT
LIFE AMONG PRISONERS
(Continued from Page One)
Salvation Army 25 years ago. They
are equally in command of this organ-
ization. Work in the prison branch
is their specialty. Their purpose is
to reach and administer to men in
the prisons and to help them rein-
sate themselves after their release.
In an interview Mrs. Booth stated
that over 25,000 men have come to
her to get a new start In life. "I
have come from the prison national
congress at Columbus and leave for
the prison at Jackson tomorrow. The
boys are looking for me."
Prof. A. E. Wood of the sociology
department, introduced Mrs. Booth..
The lecture was given under the au-
spices of the Kings' Daughters of the
Congregational church.
ARMORY DANCING SCHOOL. Prof.
Mittenthal's class from 7 to 8:30. You
are guaranteed to know how to dance
the one step, fox trot, and waltz in
one term. Rates reasonsable. Enroll
Friday if possible.-Adv.
Patronize Daily advertisers.-Adv.
Our Aim--
You
at
Your
Best

TWO GRADS BACK ON FACULTY
OF SURVEYING DEPARTMENT
Two old grads of Michigan are back
this year on the'faculty of the sur-
veying department. They are Prof.
Thomas J. Mitchell, '12, and Harold
J. McFarlan, '17.
Since graduation Professor Mitch-
ell has been"engaged in hydrographic
and triangulation work with the U.
S. Lake survey. This position has
taken him over all the great lakes
and, according to Professor John-
son, is the best experience for an en-
gineer that is to be had in this coun-
try. Professor Mitchell is .a member
of a number of engineering and sci-
entific societies and a member of Tau
Beta Pi since his Ann Arbor days.
Mr. McFarlan's work has kept him
in the field since 1917. Beginning at
Ste. Marie under L. C. Sabin, '90, he
was for a while a contractor in De-
troit and an engineer in Flint before
returning to the Universty.
MEN WEIGHING OVER 150 MAY'
SIGN FOR BLOOD TRANSFUSION
To be prepared for any necessity
that may arise, the University hospi-
tal is asking men whose weights are
over 150 pounds and who are willing

to donate a quantity of their blood for
transfusion, to register with Dr. Mor-
rl at the hospital. A number of
men have already handed in their
names but more are needed.
"It is not generally known that the
blood of all persons is not alike, but
is of four classes," said Dr. Morrill.
"That the transfusion may be effec-
tive, the blood used must be of the
same class as that of the patient.
Those who register -will be called lat-
er in groups; samples of their blood
will be taken. Each sample will be
analyzed and the results recorded for
future reference."
A fee of $15 will be paid to those
whose blood is used for transfusion.
FORSYTHE ASSERTS SMOKING
IMPAIRS. YOUNG MEN'S HEALTH
Declaring that although smoking
does no appreciable injury to the
grown man, it is harmful to the boy
'of immature age, Dr. W. E. For-
fsythe, of the University Health Serv-
ice, brought out one of a number of
points of vital interest to University
men in the course of his third health
talk to freshmen yesterday afternoon
in Natural Science auditorium.
Read The Daily for Campus News.

vUERTHI
LAST TIME TODAY
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LATE WIRE BRIEFS
New York, Oct. 18. - Organized'
search for the well advertised "miss-
ing link," the remains of the pre-1
historic man, that scientists, since the
day of Darwin, have longed to exam-
ine, is to be carried on for a five year
period beginning next February.
An expedition financed by $250,000
fund will penetrate remote regions,l

San Francisco, Oct. 18. - Reports
that 40 cases of whisky and gin were
withdrawn from government bonded
warehouses for the entertainment of
the delegates and other visitors at the
Democratic convention, are being
thoroughly investigated, according to
an announcement from the office of U.
S. District Attorney, Frank Silva, here
tonight.
VARIOUS CLASSES HOLDING
ELECTIONS THIS WEEK

Just Received
Cross' Shorter History of England and Greater
Britain. Pargment's exercises §rancais Part I.
Jroulten 's Principles of Banking

I.

and even if it fails to uncover rem-
nants of man's prehistoric, it is plan- (Continued from Page One)
ned to bring back to New Yok "the
greatest natural history collection" tutional for a class to hold nomina-
the world has ever seen. tions and final elections on the same
The American Museum of natural day, the medic elections, which were
history, which is sponsoring the ex- held yesterday have been declared ir-
pedition, announced tonight that its regular by the Student council. The
associates are the American Asiatic
soicety and the Asia magazine. Pri- names of -the two highest men for
vate contributions have been made al- each office on the nominating ballots
so by Prof. Willard Stright, . P. will be placed on a printed ballot
Morgan, Geo. Baker, Childs Frick, W. and the final election will be held next
A. Harriman and Charles L. -Bern- week, which is in accordance with the
heimer. constitution.
Huntsmen and cowboys as well as Plans for the class elections in the
professors and scientists will be in- other schools and colleges will be
cluded in the party, which will visit announced upon the bulletin boards of
many parts of Asia. the respective schools this week.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOK STORES

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Michigan and Illinois Pennants and
Arm Bands for Saturday's Game
-- also -
Collegiate Blankets
DARLING & MALLEAUX
224-226 SOUTH STATE STREET
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