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April 24, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-24

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!

SECTION
ONE

I

r1 x

ttl

ASSOCIATEL
PRESS
I' AY AND NIIGHT' 11

VOL. XXXI. No. 139. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 24, 1921. PRICE FIVE

x - . _

GERMAN CABINET
HOW LOOM S OVER
APPEAL TO U. S.

REICUSTAG NOT CONSULTED
NOTE ASKING HARDING
TO ARBITRATE

ON

POSITION OF DR. SIMONS
ENDANGERED BY RIFT
Berlin's Answer to American Refusal
to Interfere in Rearations
Expected Today
Berlin, April 23. - It is reported
that an "elastic" rieparations total, to
be decided from year to year by an in-
ternational "board of appraisal", will
be suggested in Germany's reply to
President Harding to be sent to Wash-
ington today and to be announced in
the Reichstag later in the day. This
is the outstanding feature of the new
proposals finally agreed on by lead-
ing German statesmen after all nigt
conferences.
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, April 23. - The German
note in answer to the recent Ameri-
can note on the reparation question
will be forwarded to Washington to-
night, it was announced. The German
note, it was understood, will embody
German counter proposals on the rep-
aration question.
A cabinet crisis appeared imminent
as a result of the discontent aroused
by the government's failure to con-
sult the Reichstag before asking Pres-
ident Harding of the United States to
a$ediate between Germany and the
Allies relative to reparation. The po-
sition of Dr. Walter Simons, foreign
minister, is particularly in peril.
UNIVERSITY MAY AID IN
CHINESE RESEARCH WORK
Archaelogical research work in
China may be undertaken by the Uni-
versity of Michigan in co-operation
with other universities in the United
States. Following an invitation from
the -University of California that this
University work with the coast school
in the proposed archaelogical ,re-
search, a committee composed of Dean
Alfred Lloyd, of the' Graduate school,
and Prof. Campbell Bonner and Prof.
Henry Sanders, was appointed at a
conference of the deans to study the
problem of Michigan's co-operating.
The Chinese research plan is fos-
ter'ed by the committee on interna-
tional affairs oftthe University of Cal-
ifornia and will endeavor to assist the
'Chihese government in bringing out
publications of scientific and scholarly
interest.
The committee, in presenting the
matter to this university, states that
the problems involved in an adequate
study of Chinese historical and arch
aeological materials should appeal to
students everywhere throughout the
United States and not in the Univer-
sity of 'California alone. If sufficient
interest is found to exist among other
universities of the country, the com-
mittee suggests that representatives
of all sections of the country be ap-.
pointed to formulate a plan of co-
operation whereby scholarly work in
these fields may be undertaken.
SENIOR NOTICE
Seniors who have not ordered
caps and gowns are requested to
do ,so at once at George Moe's
store;
THE WEATHER
Probably Showers and Warmer

I30 REQUIRED FOR
FRENCH PLAY CAST
More than 30 people are required
for the cast of "Le Bourgeois Gentil-
homme" which will be presented by
members of the Cercle Francais at 8
o'clock Thursday evening in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. The production
is under the direction of Jean B.
Cloppet, director of the Cercle Fran-
cais, and Prof. Rene Talamon, of the
French department.
Octave Antonio, '21, will play Mon-
siuer Jourdain, the bourgeois, while
Hilda E. Webster, '22, is cast as his
wife. The 'parts of Nicole, Cleonte,
Dorienene, and Dorante will be taken
by Margaret E. Beckett, '22, William"
M. Randall, '21, Anna E. Gabler, '23,
and Lawrence W. Mack, '22. Joyce
McCurdy, '21, will enact the role of
Lucile. Other members of the produc-
tion are Henry J. Ranft, '21, Byron F.
Field, '21, Bennett F. Avery, '23, Phil-
ip C. Foley, '21, T. C. Sedgwich, '21,
and Charles B. Coe, '22E.
FOUR' SPOTLI GHT
ACTS SELECTED
Two More to be Added; Ineligibility
Hampers Selection of Skits
by Committee
STARS OF OPERA ARE TO
APPEAR IN NEW SELECTIONS
Four of the acts for the Spring,
Spotlight have been decided upon and.
it is expected that two more will be
added to the bill that is to be present-
ed Tuesday evening at Hill auditor-
ium. Ineligibility has been one of the
causes of the difficulties encountered
by the Union, but it is thought that
the two acts contemplated will not be
held up for this reason.
The skits that are selected for the
show include John Cunningham, '23E,
Henry Morton, '23E, and George
Schemm, '23, as eccentric enteiain-
ers de luxe; Robert McCandless, '21,
with a collection of character songs;
the mandolin sextette, which will fea-
ture some of the hits of the last opera;
and a quartette composed of Kemp
Kena, Sch. of M., Thomas Underwood,
'21, Paul Wilson, '23L, and Albert
Schirmer, '22E. The two last named
are to appear in feminine roles in
which they have both scored success-
es in recent operas.
Tickets to the show, priced at 50
cents are on sale at Cushing's and at
the bookstores.
iuletinS
Redlands, Calif., April 23.-Charles,
W. Pddock, of the University ofI
Southern California, broke a world's
record for 100 meters, 200 meters, 300
yards, and 300 meters at the Southern,
California A. A. U. meet here today,,
according to official timers.
Paddock's time for 100 meters was
10 2-5; 200 meters, 21 1-5: 300 yards,
30 1-5; 300 meters, 33 4-5 seconds. He
ran 100 yards in 9 3-5 seconds ty-
ing the world's record and 220 yards in
21 1-5 seconds.
Champaign, Ill., April 23.-Univer-
sity of Illinois, 8; University of Chi-
cago, 2.
EXTENSION LECTURES GIVEN
BY CROSS AND HENDERSON

Prof. H. R. Cross, of the fine arts de-
partment, lectured yesterday afternoon
and evening at Muskegon Heights on
the subject of . "American Art."
"Michigan Women" was the subject
of the address delivered by Prof. W.;
D. Henderson, of the Extension serv-
ice, yesterday afternoon before the
Collegiate alumnae at Grand Rapids.
Both lectures were given under the
auspices of the University Extension
service.

ORATORICAL A9SS 9N
NAMESGANDIDATES
Students Will Vote on Nominees at
Coning All-Campus Elec-
tion
FOUR OFFICERS AND EIGHT
DELEGATES TO BE..CHOSEN

Nominees for the offices of and mem-
bership in the Oratorical association
who will be elected at the coming All-
campus election were announced yes-
terday by C. M. Youngjohn, '22L, pres-
ident of the association. At the same
time Youngjohn explained some of the
duties which devolve upon the mem-
bers of the association. -
The.chief duties of the members ore
to decide upon the speakers who will
speak on the University's lecture plat-
form, to decide upon the policy to be
used in various speaking contests
throughout they year, and to assist in
making arrangements for these events.
According to Youngjohn, many excep-
tionally fine artists are being secured
for next year.
Nominees who will run for the var-
ious offices are: President, Earl
Miles, '23L, and O. W. Rush, '22; vice-
president, W. P. Connel, '23L, and P.
H. Scott, '22; treasurer, N. R. Buch-
an, '22, and G. O. Wallace, '22; secre-
tary, Euphemia B. Carnahan, '22, and
Martha Shepard, '22; delegates-at-
large, E. M. Apple, '22L, J. A. Bacon,
'23, E. F. Boxell, '23L, J. K. Brum-
baugh, '23, Beatrice Champion, '23L,
W. A. Hockingw '23, L. E. Grubaugh,
'22, Beta M. Hasley, '22, R. R. Johnson,
'23, Madeline McGurk, '24, E. T. Rams-
dell, '23, R. B. Ritter, '22, W. M. See-
Iey, '22, Celma Simonson, '23, Cather-
ine Stafford, '24, and H. H, Warner,
'23L.
One candidate for each office will be
elected and eight delegates-at-large.
Prof. Carver Speaks in Buchanan
Prof. Harry C. Carver, professor in
the mathematics department, spoke on
"Playing the Game" Friday night be-
fore the High School Athletic associa-
tion at Buchanan.

jonn t. nger, mrs. osepn urs-
ley, Mrs. Junius E. Beal,'Mrs. E. M.
Wurster, Mrs. George E. Lewis, Mrs.
H. W. Douglas, Mrs. Louis Boynton,
Miss Carrie Pettengill, Mrs. M. L.
Ward, Mrs. J. J. Travis, Mrs. Carl
Braun, Mrs. William Goodyear, Mrs.
George W. Patterson, Miss Fadira
Crocker.
The ball will be informal, and mu-
sic will be furnished by Fischer's or-
chestra of Kalamazoo. Proceeds will
go to the Washtenjw chapter of the
Red Cross and will be used especially
for the county visiting nurses' funds.
Tickets for the dance are on sale at
Quarry's, Graham's, the Cadillac gar-
age, Rash's grocery, and the Ann Ar-
bor Savings bank. The price has been
set at $3, no war tax.
HOSPIITAL LABOR
STRIKE SETTLED,

PATRONESSES OF
BALL ANNOUNCEDWOLVERINES DEFEAT BOILERMAKERS,
Patronessesfor theRed Cross Char-N PENING ONFERENE GAME
ity ball to be held Tuesday evening in
Barbour and Waterman gymnasiums t
are announced as follows: Mrs. M.
L. Burton, Dean Myra B. Jordan, Mrs.
J hi R E ffina Mrc Jnah hn~z BOFU 1 "SIIGNN E

State Officials, Contractors,
Workers' Leaders Reach
Agreement,

and

PRESENT COMPROMISE WILL
BE IN FORCE UNTIL MAY 1
Negotiations last Friday between
state officials at Lansing, contractors
in charge of construction at the new
University hospital, and local labor
leaders resulted in an agreement
whereby the carpenters, plumbers,
and electricians who quit work at the
hospital April 8, when notified of a 20
per cent reduction in wages will re-
turn to work Monday morning.
According to Edward Wahl, secre-
tary of the building trades council,
the workmen will return to the vari-.
ous lines of employment under the
same conditions and at the same
wages in force before the walkout of
April S.
It is expected that the matter of
wages will be arbitrated May 1, when
the "gentlemen's agreement'" now in
force between the contractors and
labor unions will expire.

CO LLECTON OF INAUGURAL ,
ADDRESSES READY FOR PRESS
Proof-reading and final make-up has
been finished on the collection -of in-
augural addresses which were deliv-
ered here last fall, and printing will1
be started as soon as possible.'
Editing of the speeches, which was
done by Prof. John L. Brumm of the
retoric department, has been com-
pleted for some time. Recently the
proof-reading was done and with the
completion of the final make-up of the
volume, the collection should go to
press. At the present time over-crowd-
ed conditions in the printing shops are#
responsible for the delay.
The collec on,which contains' all
the speeches delivered at the inau-
guration of the President of the Uni-
versity last fall, will be sent to all of
the places on the exchange lists of the
Library and to all those who aided in
the exercises.
Friday Last Day
To Order Senior
Lit Invitations,
Orders for senior lit invitations
will be received until Friday after-
noon, and a representative of the
class committee, will be in the Univer-
sity hall booth from 2 to 4 o'clock
each afternoon this week to accom-
modate those who have not yet placedr
their orders. Requests may al o be
mailed to the committee at. '23 E.
Kingsley street, and those seniors whol
have not received order blanks are re-<
quested to signify the number of each1
kind of the invitations they wish andf
to enclose a check with their appli-
cations.l
The engraved cards furnished by
the committee are to be in the form l
of announcements rather than invita-
tions, as has been customary. It was
the opinion of the committee that this
was advisable, inasmuch as each sen-
ior is limited to two Commencementt
guests. A personal .note is to be
added to the announcements when
they are used as invitations.4
The prices, as announced previous-t
ly, are 60 cents for the leather invi-
tations and 10 cents for the engraved1
announcements, and these charges
cover the double envelopes.t
The senior class will meet at 4
o'clock Wednesday afternoon in room
205, Mason hall, to consider severalt
matters of class business, amonge
which is the informal afternoon par-
ty to be held Saturday afternoon, May
14, in Barbour gymnasium. ,
It has been announced that those1
seniors who have ordered their capsf
and gowns can get them at George
Moe's store after May 1.1

DIXON SHOWS REAL STUFF I
ALMOST SEVEN INNINGS
ON MOUND
MICHIGAN DRIVE FOR
FOURTH TITLE BEGU
Uteritz Drives Out Four Blows In Fly
Trips to Plate; Only Vick
Falls to Connect
Michigan batting and pitching yes
terday combined to bring the Wlvek
ine nine safely past the first milepos
on the long road to the fourth co
secutive Big Ten title. Purdue's as
gregation was the victim, the Boler
makers bowing 9 to 3 before the mas
terful hurling of Dixon and the ba
rage attack of the Maize and. Blu
stickers.
In the six and two-thirds inning
which he pitched after relieving R
zicka in the third, Dixon allowed nc
even the semblance of a hit until tw
were out in the ninth. Then he loo
ened for a moment, but long enoug
to permit Wagner to drive out a lon
double. Purdue batsmen could g
only four hits off the two Wolverin
hurlers.
Ruzicka Starts Well
Ruzicka started off well in the firs
fanning White after .Stanwood ha
gone out by the Van Boven-Johns
route. Then he hit Strubbe, ,passe
K. Fawcett, and allowed W. Faweel
to single, scoring Strubbe. Michiga
put things on an even basis immedi
ately, Uteritz 'tripling and Van Bove:
scoring him with a single to left.
In the second the massacre starte
in earnest. Vick flied to short, bu
Ruzicka followed him with a clea:
double to cente, and Uteritz cracke
out a neat single, scoring the bi,
pitcher. This combination of battin
offensive spelled the showers for Wal
lace, who started the game in the bo:
for Purdue. He was relieved by Wag
ner, the Boilermakers' much toute
portwheeler, who fared little bettei
Van Boven reached first on an erro
by Strack and Perrin singled, scorIn
Uteritz.
Shackleford Reaches First
Shackleford re.ached' first on a field
er's choice that failed in its attemnp
to retire Van Boven. Karpus and John
son followed with singles that score
Van Boven, Shackleford and Karpu
crossing the plate on Johnson's singl
through first. Perrin, in the mean
time, had been retired while trying t
pilfer the second sack, and Genebac
whiffed, ending the procession acros
the last marker.
Purdue fell on Ruzicka with a ven
geance in the third, Wallace triplin
to start the inning. ;Stanwood walk
ed, and White flied to Uteritz. A sin
gle by Strubbe, combined with a pass
ed ball by Vick, scored Wallace an
advanced the runners. K. Fawet
walked, filling the bases, and Ruzick
then forced in a run wheni he hande
W. Fawcett another free ticket to th
keystone sack. Coach Fisherdecide
about that time that Ed. had ha
enough, giving him the high sign an
sending Dixon into the box. From tha
time on things were easy picking fo
the Wolverines. Dixon proved conclu
sively that he had earned a{place a
one of Michigan's leading twrler
holding the Purdue batters seemingl
at his mercy, and, incidentally, send
ing a single and a double out into tb
gardens.
Double Plays Liven Game
Three double plays livened up tb
game to a large extent, two going t
the credit of Michigan and one t
Purdue. Uteritz, Van Boven, an
Johnson were the principal actors i

the former, while W. Fawcett, White
and Strack took the leading roles fc
the Boilermakers. Uteritz led thi
(Continued on Page Fight)

"'SoPhs! ", First Underclass Blooklet,
,Appears As' Campus Inn ova(i on

(By L. A. K.)
About every so often the tranquil-:
lity of the Michigan's campus is brok-
en in upon by something new-some-
thing perhaps a bit startling because:
of the newness-which at once takes
the eye of everyone and, whether it
draws favorable or unfavorable com-
ment, shows that'somebody is onto his
job..
Is Something New
Such is the conclusion which may
be drawn when one reads -"Sophs!",
the booklet 'which has just been pub-
lished by the class of 1923. That book
is an innovation on the campus. It
is something new, and if it shows
nothing else, it certainly indicates
that the sophomore lit class is not
asleep.
Naturally, the booklet is not perfect;
we could not expect to to be so. But
what is significant about its publica-
tion is that it is something original.
Never before, so far as is known, has
any class comprising lesser lights than.
seniors had the audacity, spunk, class.
enthusiasm-call it what you will-to
publish a book of its .own, and thet
group that has undertaken the publi-
cation and issuing of this initial num-
her of a here-to-fore non-existant un-
derclass book is to be commended on
the spirit that brought it forth.
For on the whole, the book is well
written, well edited, and well printed,

and shows conscientious and consist-
antly enthusiastic work on the part
of those who got it out. That is what
makes it significant.
But that is not all. Underlying its
whole cdntents, "Sophs!" has a tone,
a message. All the way through its
fairly well ordered outbursts, the idea
of class and University co-operation
prevails. The page of "Don'ts" gives
in a very forceful and rather finger-
scorching way the list of things a
member of the University should do if
he is to mean anything to himself and
his institution while here.
Lead Article Good
"Meet Mr. opportunity," the really
leading article, just helps to boost the
whole tenor of the book along. Its
writer gives in the four pages alloted'
to him what promises to be something
of a jolt to the inactive sophomore
on the campus, and does it in a good.
natured, somewhat facetious, though
none the less forceful way. But turn-
ing further on, we find that the whole
latter half of the booklet is devoted
to lists of men who are already "do-
ing things," and it would almost seem,
that his words were those of a large
part of the class, rather than of only a
small but energetic minority.
"The Spring Games" is another ar-
ticle which, it is to be hoped, may do
something to liven up this year's con-
(Continued on Page Eight)

STUDENT DEATH RATE
AT UNIVERSITY

LOW

Student deaths, at the Univer-
sity of Michigan for the past 20
years, according to a recent re-
port of the Health service, aver-
age 1.13 per 1,000 enrollment.
This includes all students who
were registered in the academic
years whether they died in Ann
Arbor or elsewhere.
The general death rate, accord-
ing to the same report, runs five
per 1,000 population for the age
group of 20 to 24 years in the
United States.

I

h,

Spring

Tickets at Bookstores

Tickets at Bookstores

SPOTLIGHT

VAUDEVILLE

and Cushing's

and Cusling's

50c

Tuesday, April 26
HILL AUDITORIUM

so0c

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