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April 22, 1921 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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DRA L HELP
RUN S~UM MER CAMPI

Joins Coach Mann, of D. A. C.,
Starting Outing Place for Boys
Under New Plans

in

ence diamond champions for the past
three years.
In selecting and purchasing the site
for the camp great care was taken to
have it perfect in every respect. Ah-
mic lake is in the famed Muskoka [
lakes region, known as the Highlands
of Ontraio. Two bathing beaches, a Bollermakers -Come Here for First
golf course, football field, tennis Conference Game Next
courts, baseball diamonds, adequate Saturday
housing facilities, motor boats, row-
boats, and canoes combine to give PASTIMERS GIVEN HARD DRILL
Chikopi advantages enjoyed by few
such summer camps, and it is the hope DESPITE SLOW, SOGGY FIELD
and belief of all in charge that this,
the first year of the new venture, will Purdue is tlfe next opponent on the
prove as successful as advance indi- baseball schedule, the Boilermakers'
cations promise that it will be. strong team coming here Saturday

tition furnished by Ypsilanti being
given as the reason for his inabilify
to make any statement.
SOCCER NONICE
Soccer practice will be held
at 2 o'clock sharp Satu day aft-
ernoon on Ferry field. All men
are urged to be out and to re-
port promptly in order that it
will be possible to witness the
Varsity baseball game later.
10 New en Out
ForGrid rill;,'
)Yakes 8o In All1

FIRST

90 YEARLINGS ANSWER
CALL FOR BALL SQUAD

YEAR TEAM APPEARS
WEAK IN BATTERY
DEPARTMENT

MANY MICHIGAN MEN ASSIST
IN DIRECION OF NEW CAMP
Coach Elmer Drulard; of the Varsity
tank squad, has always believed that,
in the field of summer camps for boys
there is room, not only for more
camps, but for a great degree of im-
provement in the present systems un-
der which they are operated. That he
is ready to put his beliefs into actual
existence is evinced by the fact that,,
in conjunction with CoachMatt Mann,
of the Detroit Athletic club, he is this
summer opening Camp Chikopi at
Ahmic Lake, Ontario.

iWORK OF TENNIS MEN
IS HAMPERED BY RAINS'

LAST

YEAR'S TEAM INVITED
MEET PONTIAC
PIAYERS

TO

Admit Only 50
The camp is fouided with the Idea
that a real vacation for boys is one
which gives them a wide range of ath-
letic activity, a free life in the open
with only such restrictions as are ne-
cessary for proper discipline and I
training. But 50 boys will be admitted
to- the camp, axed these will be care-
fully ,selected from only the beet
homes.
Coachey Drulard and Mann have
both had wide experience in the field,
Mr. Mann having operated his own
camp in New England fof some years
past, and Drulard having served in of-
ficial capacities at various well known
summering places for boys. About
them they have gathered men famous
in the world of athletics and men who
are known as sticklers for clean sport
and wholesome life. In the selection
of counsellors and advisers Michigan
has had a goodly share.
Frank Steketee, Michigan's great.
half back, is one of those whose names
are found among the list of pamp of-
ficials. He is to have charge of the
specialized football training which is
to be offered. Walter Wesbrook, ten-
nis captain and Conference singles
champion, rated as the greatest col-
legiate court player in the country, is
another of the counsellors.
Many on Board
On the advisory board are such men
as Dr. George May, Wolverine physic-
al director, Steve Farrell, track coach,
Carl Johnson, '20, track captain and
member of the 1920 American Olympic
team, ald Carl Lundgren, now base-
ball mentor at the University of llli-
nos and coach of Michigan's Confer-

Although hampered by yesterday's
rain, candidates for the Varsity ten-
nis team worked out on the concrete
court, where the squad will continue
to practice daily whenever the condi-
tion of the clay courts is such as to
prohibit play.
Dr. A. 0. Lee and Prof. A. F. Boak,
who will act in an advpsory capacity
with/Walter Wesbrook in the selection
of the team, will .be on hand during
the afternoons to watch contestants.
Both men are experienced judges and
players of the game. Dr. Lee for many
years was the active coach of the net
team.t
Matches between the tryouts are ar-
ranged for every afternoon, and all
candidates for the team are expected
to report for play every afternoon in
the week. At least six hours a week
of practice should be engaged in.
Scores and records of all play will be
kept, and the final selection of the
squad will be partly based on these
comparative' scores.
Members of last :year's team have
been invited as the guests of the Pon-
tiac Tennis club to engage in a prac-
tice match with the Pontiac club on
Saturday. Paul Leidy, '09, member of
the Varsity net team for three years,
has gathered together a team from lo-
cal tennis enthusiasts and extended
an invitation to the 1920 team to play.
Walter Wesbrook will not make the
trip, but the other members, Lewis
Munz, George Reindel Jr., Fritz Wor-
cester, and Bob Angell, will go. As'it
was too early in the year to pick this
year's team, Mr. Leidy has invited last
season's men who are all in school.

afternoon to face Coach Fisher's Con-
ference champions. As the game 'is
the first Big Ten tilt on the list, the
coach is bending every effort toward
getting his aggregation into top form.
The infield was the recipient of the
larger part of his attention yesterday
afternoon. Despite a wet diamond the
results were highly encouraging. The
rains tof the morning had made' the
ground soggy and slow, but the in-
fielders went lafter batted balls in, fine
fashion. .Klein, who replaced Karpus
at the third station during the course
of the practice, showed exceptionally
well, making a¢ pair of barehanded
stops that drew applause -from the
spectators along the sidelines. Uteitz
also came ih for his share of appre-
ciation by numerous difficult snatches
of fast and slow grounders.
Ruzicka and Mudd, victorious pitch-
ers of Wednesday, worked out as us-
ual with their mound partners. The
man who will start in the box against
Purdue is not yet picked, but it would
be no surxgise to see Big Ed. on the
slab at the opening inning..
Genebach, Perrin, and Shackleford,
who, because of . air-tight pitching,
were given little opportunity to show
what they could do on Wednesday,
were given pleyty pf hard practice,
the driving wind whichN swept across
the field making fly balls difficult to
judge and handle.

Ten new men were sent through the
the first lessons in the art of pigskin
chasing yesterday afternoon at Ferry
field, bringing the total humber who
have signed up to about 80. Wleman*
had the linemen spilling their oppon-
ents, blocking, and doing other tricks]
that will aid them next fall. The backs,
were taken in hand by Steketee, who+
made his first appearance in togs, un-
til Archie Hahn arrived -on the scene.+
Passing and falling on the ball com-
prised the work for the backs. "Stek"
and Kirk spent part of their time in
place kicking.
The idea of Wieman and Hahn is to
add a little more every day to that
already learned in order that the men
will soon become acquainted with all
phases of the game. In this way they
will be able to get down to hard work
when the call is heard in September.
ADDITIONAL SPORTS ON PAGE 8
Ask your students if their text books
would not be worth 15c per hundred
pages more to theni if mimeographed
on book paper. Edwards Bros., 310
S. State St.-Adv.

More t)an 90 first year men have
already reported to Coach Mather for
freshman baseball Wednesday after-
noon. The initial workouts consisted
mainly of batting and infield practice
although the outfield try-outs were
kept busy.
It is stilltoo early to make any pre-
,dictions, but the coach is well satisfied
with the showing of the yearlings with
the one exception of the battery de-
partment, which is worrying Mather
to some extent. These candidates
started their preliminary training sev-
eral weeks before the spring vacation
but to date have not showed up as
well as it was hoped that they would.
This is particularly the case with the
hurlers.
Kipke, Knode, Genelli, and Benyas
performed creditably in the infield,
while Patterson and Mayer kept the
outfielders on their foes by their good
work with the bat. As the squad will
eventually be cut to 22 men, Coach
Mather told all the candidates that he
expected them to report with regular-
ity if they intended to remain with the
squad.

IYes terday 's Gary
American League
Detroit 3, Chicago 8.
St. Louis 3, Cleveland 4.
New York 6, Philadelphia 1.
Washington 0, Boston 1.
National League
Pittsburgh 8, Cincinnati 7.
New York 5, Philadelphia 6.
Boston 2, Brooklyn 4.
Chicago-St. Louis-rain-.
The Mabel A. Tolford Shop
first door eastof the Arcade Th
You will find the newest of idea.
the best of workmanship there.-
Invitations
to visit
shops
or plants
,or workrooms

are
frequently
given

f

but

N

Coach Fisher had nothing
concerning his men, the poor

to say No. 10 Tomatoes, 60c per,
compe- Schultz Grocery, State St.-Adv.

can.

m1

ARE YOU INTERESTED in the
WELFARE OF YOUNG MENT
Play is as necessary as work.
Any game which is interesting
enough to afford real Re-crea-
tion is. a beneficial game, pro-
vided it is played amid clean,
decent rsurroundings.
Most young men prefer games
like billiards for their leisure
hours. If you are interested in
the welfare of. young men, you
are invited to visit our billiard
parlors as often as you wish.
You will find that this is a
place of clean sport, where
gambling, profanity :Wand other
undesirable elements are abso-
lutely TABOO.
HUSTON BROS.
Pocket and Carom Billiards.
Cigars and Candies.
Soft Drinks and Light Lunches.,
Cigarettes and. Pipes.
"We Try to Treat You Right"
No. 4

itis
Sbecause
of the

';

*
many
times)
we are
tempted
to believe

This No.
for
Dodge
T'axi

downright
certainty
that

I

no one

will

accept.
However,

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ii

II

we

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i34t#'Appal , n 1 4r

really

i

A .

t . e t tp

dune . : .

RACKET RESTRINGINNG1

24 HOUR SERVICE

All Rackets Restrung in our Store by Expert Restringerl

i
;
+ ...
l
I

Secure Your, Spring

Did You

Suit?

If not we 're in a position to show you
some very attractive Herringbon e
English and Scotch Tweeds at very
reasonable prices..
We have been making a number of
Golf Suits with extra trousers lately.",
Why not get one of these made with
Knickers and extra trousers?
TINKER & COMPANY
S. State St. at William St.
These Suits are All Individually Tailored

i ir

are sincere
when
we ask

you.
best
the

can
see

to inspect
our kitchens.
There

you-
to visit
and

super-sanitary
conditions
under which
food
is prepared
at the

SPECIAL

0

Regulation Outseam Balls -
Louisville $ugger Indoor Bats

$2.00 each!
95c each4

R

% t

N. Univ. Ave. Next to Arcade Theatre

Arcade
Cafeteria
and
Finerle's,

(

711

.__..

.

.,.

.

a
a _ __ - 3

..._.

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