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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 21, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

managing editor in 1904. As a mem-
ber of the class of '04 he served as{

annual meeting of directors
ibune company which was
Monday, S. Emory Thoma-
usiness manager of the Chi-
up, was elected to the board
rs.
mason began his newspaper
e in the University. He was
of the Michigan Daily staff
3 four years in college, and

chairman of several important com-
mittees and was elected class treas-
urer in his senior year. He was a
member of Quadrangles and Michi-
gamua.
Daily advertising will spell prosper-
ity for you.-Adv;

THE MICHI
HESTON CHOSEN PRESIDING
JUDGE OF RECORDER'S COURT
Judge William M. Heston, '04L, has
been elected presiding judge of the Re-
corder's court of Detroit, succeeding
Judge Harry B. Keidan.
Judge Heston will assume his new
duties April 21, until which time Judge
Keidan will continue in office. The
law creating the court limits presid-
ing judges to not more than one year
in that office at one time.

Try Daily advertismg and
your business grow.-Adv.

watch

With acknowledgments to K. C. B.

No wnder die £w

mnRll

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L = - 7- - 01 "W", , lml -- M

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wO.r

9

i

I SWELLED with pride.
THE FAT man next to me.
* 9*
WAS READING one.
OF MY cigarette ads.
AND I felt him chuckle.
.
NOW NO one had ever.
PRAISED THAT ad.
$O I had to ask.
IF HE liked it.
AND HE said, "Sure."
AND LAUGH ED some more.
THEN HE said.
4 4 *
"LOOK HERE" and pointed.
AND WHERE I'd written.
"PURE TOBACCO."
THE PRINTER had set.
"PURE TABASCO."
AND THAT'S why the man.
THOUGHT MY ad.
WAS HOT stuff.
BUT THEN he said.
"FORGET THE ads.
I NEVER read 'em.
BUT LEMME tell you.
SOMETHING DIFFERENT.
* * 9
THEY OUGHT to say.
ABOUT THAT cigarette.
* * *9
AND THAT is this.
THEY SATISFY."
AND DARNED If I don't think.
HE REALLY believed.
HE WAS giving me.
SOMETHING NEWI
A !h 44

REERASSTART FOR
mUsic CLUBS' CONCERT
GIRLS' {:LEE CLUB TO BE AT
DETROIT NORTIIERN ON
SmAY 6
Rehearsals for the Glee and Man-
dolin clubs' spring concert which will
be given the second week in May in
Hill auditorium, commence this week.
This year's entertainment is to be dif-
ferent from the regular concerts in
that vaudeville and specialty acts will
be interspersed between the numbers-
of tJie combined clubs.
Researse Twice a Week
The Glee club is in charge of Prof.
William Wheeler of the University
School of Music, who announces that
the personnel of the club is n6w com-
plete with 35 voices. All men who
have been excused from* practices' on
account of work inthe"nion opera
are expected to report at once, and
regularly from now on, since positions
will be endangered by absences. The
club will rehearse twice a week, at
7:15 o'clock Wednesday and Thursday
evenings, in the reading room on the,
second floor of the Union.
Prof. Frank L. Thomas will-direct
.the Mandolin club, the rehearsals be-
ing held Tuesday and Thursday even-
ings at the Union. The club numbers
25 men.
Girls' Mandolin Club to Assist
Arrangements have been completed-
by the University Girls' Glee club for"
two concerts, one to be given in De-
troit and the other to be given in Ann
Arbor. The University Girls' Mandolin
club will assist the Glee club in both
concerts.
Under the auspices of the Michigan
alumnae of Detroit, the club will ap-
pear in concert at Northern high
school on Friday evening, May 6. A
concert will be given in Hill audi-
torium at 8:15 o'clock Tuesday even-
ing, May 10.
Due to the face that all Michigan
alumnae are working for the new wo-
men's building, no other concerts will
be given this year.

Ann

Arbor

av

LUCRECIA BORI

(Metropolitan Opera Cmpany)

. Soprano

Best ival

ROSA PONSELLE

Soprano

(Metropolitan Opera Company)

FLORENCE HINKLE

Soprano

GRACE JOHNSON KONOLD
Soprano
CYRENA VAN GORDON Contralto
(Chicago Opera Association)

Dr. Stanley's Twenty-Eighth
and Last Festival

MERLE ALCOCK

Contralto

CHARLES MARSHALL

Tenor

(Chicago Opera Association)

ORVILLE HARROLD

Tenor

YOU can blame it on the
printer if you don't see
'They Satisfy" in a Chester-
field advertisement. But be
sure of this--you'll find it in
the cigarette, every time.
Wonderful Turkish and Do-
mestic tobaccos, wonderfully
blended-it sounds easy. But
you'll find nothing else like
Chesterfields. That blend ca't
be copied.

In packages of 20protected
by special moisture-proof,,
wrapper Alsoin round
AIR- TIGHT tins of 50.

FESTIVAL NOTES
This year's appearance of the Chi-
cago Symphony orchestra at the May
Festival will make the seventeenth
time that Frederick Stock and his men
have played at Ann Arbor. The work
of this organization has always been.
popular with Ann Arbor audiences as
has been shown by the fine reception
given it whenever it has been here.
The orchestra was founded in 1891
by Theodore Thomas, who conducted
it for 14 years. After the death of Mr.
Thomas, Frederick Stock was chosen
from the ranks of the orchestra to fill
the place of its founder. For thirty
consecutive years it has played to Chi-
cago audiences and it is the third
oldest orchestra in the country.
It is said that this orchestra is the
only one in America which has not
annual deficits to meet. Since the
erection of Orchestra hall in 1904 by
popular subscription, the income from
ticket sales and from rentals has been,
sufficient to meet all expenses.
Prof. Berry Gives Lecture in Petoskey
Prof. Charles S. Berry of the educa-
tion department, spoke Tuesday night
before the Parent-Teachers' associa-
tion ofd Petoskey, on "The Care And
Culture of Backward Children." Mon-
day evening Professor Berry delivered
the same address at Marquette in con-
nection with the health week program.

LAMBERT MURPHY
(Metropolitan Opera Company)
AlTHUR MIDDLETON,

Tenor

Baritone

(Metropolitan Opera Company)

THEODORE HARRISON Baritone

(Metropolitan Opera Company)

CH ASE SIKES

Baritone
Baritone

ROBERT Mc ANDLISS

i

.v"

t

-

GUSTAF HOLMQUIST
MARIAN STRUBLE

Bass

Violinist

,C

CIGARE~TTES

4AY

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White

Swan

Laundry

TERM

FOR QUALITY AND FOR SERVICE

BEGINNING AND ADVANCED
CLASSES IN

WHFITE SWAN (

Shorthand
Bookkeeping
Banking

Typewriting
Accounting
English

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LARGE CHORUS OF SCHOOL
CHILDREN
GEORGE OSCAR BOWEN, Conductor

FANNIE BLOOMFIELD ZEISLER
Pianist
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
ALBERT A. STANLEY, Conductor
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHES-
TRA

FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor

Secretarial Training

Term
Commences
May 2nd

For Information
Address
F. G. Hamilton, Pres.

Our methods and machinery are up-to-date
in every detail. The result is better work
with less wear to the fabric. We cater
especially to the student trade
TRY US

A Limited Number of Course Tickets Still Available at

1=

$4.50, $5.00, $6.00, $7.00

Hamilton Business College

PHONE 165

CHARLES A. SINK, SECRETARY
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN

State and William Sts.

Ann Arbor

H. G. Prettyman

W. B. Gray

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