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April 20, 1921 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-20

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AND WARMER

I.

r 931k i!3an Ia1133

Li .7
DRAY AND)NICEHT N
S ERV ICE

TODAY

I

.1. No. 135.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 1921v.

PRICE FIVE

NATE COUNCIL'
RECOGNIZES NEW
SEVERAL PROBLEMS OF STUDENT
CONDUCT DISCUSSED
AT MEETING
SESSIONS TO BE HELD
FIRST, THIRD TUESDAYS
Committee Will Act on Attitude ofk
Students in "Razzing"
Athletic Teams
Official recognition was given the
Student Ad'visory committee by the
University Senate council Monday.
The committee held its first official
meeting- last night at the Union, when
it discussed several problems of stu-
dent conduct.
Regular meetings, it has been decid-
ed, will be held on the first and third.
Tuesdays of each month at the Union.
It is desired that any complaints,
criticisms, 'or suggestions be mailed
to James I. McClintock, '21L, chair-
man of the committee, at 502 East
Madison street. Action will be taken
upon these communications at the
meetings of the committee.
One of the first mea'sures to be tak-
en by the committee will be in con-
nection with the attitude taken by a
small number of students at athletic
eontests. It is requested that the
student body give the committee its
whole-hearted sco-operation in this
matter, and assist by reporting for
discipline any person who has engag-
ed in "razzing." members of an op-
posing team or showing any discour-
tesy at games.

AMERICAN UNIVERSITY UNION IN EUROPE AIDS

COMMENCEMENT
IPLANS PROGRESS

HAS OFFICES BOTH IN LONDON
AND PARIS, HEADQUAR-
TERS IN LATTER.
With the purpose of aiding Ameri-
can students in foreign countries, the
American University Union in Europe
has placed its organization at the dis-
posal of smembers of graduating class-
es of universities in this country who,
are planning to continue their work
abroad. The Union has ornces at 50
Russel Square; London, and at 1 rue
de Fleurus, Paris.
Vibbert Formerly with Union
Prof. Charles B. Vibbert, of the
philosophy department, was connect-
ed with the activities of the Union in
Paris during the war, and was. di-
COLO M BIINTREATY-
Preliminary Polls Show Pact Has at,
Least Six Votes More Tian
Necessary.
AMENDMENT WOULD INCREASE
PAYMENT :TO $30,000,000
(By Associated Press)
Washington, April 19. - Ratification
with votes to spare was the forecast
of adniinistration leaders in the sen-
ate on the eve of tomorrow's vote on
the long pending 'Colombian treaty.
Opponents of ratification for the most
part tonight conceded defeat in their
efforts to bring about a rejection of
the $25,000,000 pact.
Polls taken by advocates of ratifi-
cation were said to show that approx-
imately 40 Republicans and 30 Demo-
crats would vote in fayor of the
treaty. This would be a half dozen
more than the necessary two-thirds.
Vote on amendments the first of
Iwhich was offered today by Senator
Ransdell, Democrat, Louisiana, will be
held at 4 o'clock tomorrow, and then
the final vote on the treaty. Th~e Rans-
dell amendment provides for a$06,-
000,000 payment to Colombia for thg
loss " of Panama instead of the $25,-,
000,000 contemplated by the treaty;
for the loan of $25,000,000 to Colombia
by the United States; for cession by
Colombia of the Providence, St. An-
drew's and contiguous islands to the
United States; for construction of no
canal through Colombian territory
without the assent of the United
States, and for formation of an alli-
ance between Colombia and the Unit-
ed States. Administration leaders to-
night predicted the defeat of the
amendments.

rector of the continental division of
the Union for 1919-1920. In, his annual
report as director Professor Vibbert
outlined the work of the Union in
Paris as illustrative of the functions
undertaken ' by the organization
throughout Europe.
The headquarters of the Union in
Paris were moved to their present lo-
cation after the close of the war in
order to be nearer the center of stu-
dent life.
'Well Equipped
Included in the facilities of the
Union are a study room, a library,
and rooms large enough to accommo-
date 200 people at lectures and recep-
tions. New English reference works
and more adequate furnishings are be-
ing purchased as rapidly as funds per-
mit.
The total enrollment of American
students in French institutions of
higher education or pursuing study or
research independently during the
academic year of 1919-1920 was 280.
Similar activities are being taken up
at its London office. Additional infor-
mation regarding the Union may be
secured from Professor Vibbert or by
addressing Prof. J. W. Gunliffe, Co-
lumbia university, New York City.
SPHRG SPOTLICGHT1 ON
I .
DECK TUESDAY, E NTIRE
NEW BILL PROMISED
WILL BE SIMILAR TO FALL'SHOW;
ONE MORE DAY OPEN FOR
TRYOUTS

Baseball
28;

Game on Reunion Day, June
Union Entertainment in
the Evening

MORE THAN 125 CLASSES TO
BE HERET FR GRADUATION
Extensive plans for the alumnii at-'
tending Commencement have been ar-'
ranged, according to Wilfred B. Shaw,
secretary of the Alumni association.
Tuesday, June 28, is to be Reunion{
day and more than 25 classes have ar-
ranged to assemble at Ann Arbor to
attend the graduation exercises.
Tuesday afternoon Waseda and
Michigan will play baseball at Ferry
field, while in the evening an enter-
tainment bythe students under the
auspices of the Union is being plan-
ned.
Alumni day, June 29, will open with
a meeting of the graduates in Hill aud-
itorium. At noon a luncheon will be
served the alumni by the collegiate
alumnae. Later, in the afternoon, a
mass meeting will be held in Hill aud-
itorium to be followed by another1
baseball game between Waseda and
Michigan. For the evening the Sen-
iors are arranging an entertainment
on the steps of the Library. This will
be followed by the Senate reception in
Alumni Memorial hall.
All the graduates will register at
Alumni hall, where they will receive
badges and tickets to all the various
functions of Commencement.
The class of '71 will celebrate its
fiftieth anniversary, while the '91L,
'91E, and the '91M classes will cele-
brate their thirtieth anniversaries.
The following classes will also hold
reunions: '76, '77, '86, '86L, '94, '95,;
'96, '97L, '11E, '11M, '13,. '13E, '13L,
'14, '14E, '14L, '15, 15E, '16, '16E,
'18, '19, '19E.
fiummierlS Choose
Seasonal, Play
Just now when the campus is be-
ginning to blossom forth with a v.ar-
iety of brightly colored new headgear,
the question of hats is especially per-
tinent. Very appropriately then, the
plot of the play, "The Wonder Hat,"
which Mummers is to present at
the Women's league aparty at 4
o'clock Friday afternoon, April 22,
centers about a hat. It is a most
unusual hat, of course, possessing ex-
traordinary powers that make ,it quite
worthy of having a play written about
it.
Pierrot and Pierrette and other
fairy characters appear in the whim-
sical playlet, and combine in giving
it charm and daintiness. The .play was
to have been given before spring va-
cation, but the illness of one of the
members of the cast caused its post-
I ponement until a later date. It is ibe-
ing rehearsed under student direction.

COMMITTEE MAKES
BARBOUR AWARDS
Appointments to the Barbour schol-
arships for the coming year were
,made by the Barbour scholarships
committee at a meeting Monday aft-
ernoon. The following oriental wom-
en -received re-appointments: Kame-
yo Sadakata, Matsue Matsumoto, Kita
Fukui, Ai-lan Giang, Helen Wong,
Gien-Tsin-Liu, Me Tsung Dong, Zok
Tsung Tsac, Probhabati Das Gupta
and Asifalatika Haldar.
New appointees to the scholarships
are Miss Tao, .of Ginling college,
Nanking, ,China; Lucy Wong, Foo
Chow, China; Julia Han, National un-
ivetsity, Peking, and Margaret L~Ing,
Canton Christian college, Canton,
China.
PLANSNNOUNCED

Appearing in
First Time

Caps and Gowns for
Seniors Will Parade C

E NROLLMENT G9ll
OVERLAST YEA
LITERARY COLLEGE SHOWS
INCIREASE, FIGURES SET
AT 576
ENTIRE UNIVERSITY
TOTAL NOW 10
Decline Noted in Law School an
Hospital Training School
for Nurses
Enrollment in the University at
present time represents a gaino,
1-2 per cent over last year, accor
to a statement yesterday from,
registrar's office; 10,623 students
attending the University this yea'
against 9,401 in 1920.
One-half the gain is in the lite
college, which has an enrollmen
5,576, the total number' of stud
in 1920 being 5,007. Substantial g
are found in the enrollments of
Medical school, Engineering col
Homoeopathic Medical school, Di
college, Graduate school, aid Sun
session. The enrollment in the
school, which slightly revived fol
ing the war, has lapsed again, w
that of the University Hospital T:
ing School for Nurses shows a s
decline.
Engineers Have 0,213
Present enrollment in the Engii
ing college is placed at 2,213 stud
in comparison with 2,038 in
while the Medical school enroll:
has jumped from 394 last year to
at the present time. The Homoe
thic Medical school 'enrollment j
students over 42 last year, while
total number of students now enr
in the Dental college is 450, an
crease of 100 since last year.
Graduate school enrollment, now
represents the same increase.
Summer Session (gains

to Hql Auditorium
FRED J. PETTY AND REV.
A. W. STALKER WILL

SPEAKI

OTE FRIDAY FOR
ITO OFFICERS

OF NOMINEES TO
|D ON PLACARDS
NEAR POLLS

BE

Eilection of officers for the Women's
iague, Y. W. C. A., and Women's Ath-
Atic association will be held from 8
a 5 o'clock Friday afternoon in front1
f the Women's league room in Uni-
ersity hall. In order that everyone
ay know who the nominees are, pla"
ards bearing their pictures will bt-
osted near the polls.
League Nominees
League nominees are: President,
hekla Roese, '22, Edna Groff, '22,
[argaret Schnaple, '22; vice-presi-,
ent, Eleanor Neil, '22, Joyce McCur-
y, '22; corresponding secretary,
heodosia Burton, '23, Elsa Oiesen,
3;; recording secretary, lone Lily, '23,
atherine Kuhlman, '23; treasurer,
rances Ames, '23, Barbara Baker,
3; senior representative, Carol 'Mc-
onald, '22, Mary yanDeinse, '22;
mnior representative, Gladys McCon-
on, '23, Cara Murbach, '23, Laura'
[ills, '23, Louise Graham, '23; sopho-
ore representative, Catherine Staf-
>rd, '24, Susan Fitch, '24.
Nominees for the Y. W. C. A. are
s follows: President, Gertrude
oggs, '22, Laura Snyder, '22; vice-
resident, Ruth Goodhue, '22,. Mar-
aret Spalding, '22; secretary, Cath-
rine Greenough, '24, Judith Jenison,
; treasurer, Helen Aubrey, '23,
[argaret Kraus, '23.
Athletic Asspelation
Women's Athletic association nom-
nees are: Tresident, Helen Bishop,
2, Elsie Townsend, '22; vice-presi-
ent, Joyce VanAlstyne, '23, Marion
:och, '23; secretary, Elizabeth Caine,
4, Elizabeth Carson, '23; treasurer,
eatrice Champion, '23, Frances Wei-
aar, '22; senior representative, Doris
prague, '22, Leota Clarke, '22; jun-
or representative, .Grace Fry, '23,
lucy Huber, '23; sophomore repre-
entative, Lillian Scher, '24, Marion
'aylor; '24.
[ovies to Follow Naval Reserve Talk
Special moving pictures,- showing
he construction of the. Ford Eagles'
vhich were used in the World War,
vill follow the regular lvture of thej
aval reserve lecture course to be
iven at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow eve-

Five or six specialty acts and the
Union orchestra will feature in the
Union's Spring Spotlight vaudeville
show which will be given next Tues-
day evening in Hill auditorium. The
program is now virtually complete,
but another day will be given to those
who still have acts which they want
to present before E. Mortimer Shuter,
directory in charge of tryouts. Mr.
Shuter will be at the workshop all day
today to meet tryouts. 'P
The spring show will be of the same
nature as the regular fall Spotlight,
but an entirely new bill will be pre-
sented which is expected to surpass
former productions."
John M. Winters, '23L, is general
chairman. Committees were announc-
ed yesterday by the Union appoint-
ment board as follows: Stage--Shel-
don Brown, '22, chairman, .Walter,
Velde, '23, George L. Stone, '23, and
Lawrence W. Snell, '23; tickets-Allen
B. Sunderland, '22, chairman, David
lIcTaggart, '23, Charles Hummer, '23,
and H. A. Rasch, '23; program and
publicity-Byron Darnton, '23, chair-
man, Lee Atwood, '23, and Mark Crox-
ton, '23.

Plans for the annual Swing-out of
all senior classes, which is to be held
this year Thursday, May 5, were an-
nounced last night by Renaud Sher-
wood, '22. chairman of the Student
council committee in charge of the af-
fair.
Commencing at 3:15 o'clock in the
afternoon, members of the various
classes, garbed for the first. time in
their caps and gowns, will assemble!
on the campus. Shortly after the Var-'
sity band will begin to play inbfront
of Hill auditorium, which will be the1
signal for the seniors to start the
march toward the auditorium, where
the exercises are to be held.
Two speakers for the occasion have
already been chosen, Fred J. Petty,
president of the lit class, giving the,
senio" speech. Rev. Arthur W. Stalk-]
er, of the Ann Arbor Methodist
church, has been selected to deliver
the benediction.
Xfter the exercises, the classes will
form an "M", marching across the
campus and ending up at Alumni Me-
morial .all, where group pictures will
be taken. Further details and names
of other speakers are to be announc-'
ed soon.
April Alumnus
eatures Varied
Ancient Scripts

SENIOR LIT DANCE PLANNED'
FOR FRIDAY NIGHT AT UNION
Swing-Out Plans Will be Discussed
at Meeting at 4 O'cleck
Today
, -
A dance for members of the senior
lit class has been planned for Friday
evening at the Union. Since the dance
occurs on one of the regular Union
dance nights, surplus tickets will be1
offered for sale to the public.
This change in plans is the result;
of the decision to give an additional
entertainment to the one planned for
from 2:30 to 5:30 o'clock in the after-'
noon of May 13 at Barbour gymnas-
ium. Men and women may attend
separately since the dance is to be
entirely informal..
A class meeting will be held at 4
o'clock this afternoon, in room 205,,
Mason hall, when plans will be dis-
cussed'for Swing-out.
President Burton Meets Deans Today
President Marion L. Burton will'
hold a conference with the deans in
his office at 10 o'clock this morning.,
This will be the first meeting of the
deans since President Burton I was
taken ill with pneumonia shortly aft-
er the beginning of the semester.
Dora Moses Weds R. K. Corwin, '21E
Mrs. Dora Moses, 1308 Geddes ave-
nue, has announced the marriage of
' her daughter, Dora, to Raymond K.
Corwin, '21E. The marriage took
place Jan. 15. Mr. and Mrs. Corwin
will be at home at 708 Church street.

April Chimes.Presenfs Second
Acolyte Article; On Sale Today

(By S.T. B.)
Containing the conclusion of the
much-discussed Acolyte criticism of
student affairs, three short stories,
several articles and the usual depart-
ments, the April number of "Chimes"
made its appearance in the bookstores
yesterday, and will open its campus
sale today.
Clearly, the artigie entitled "Stu-
dent Activities: A Critical Analysis",
the conclusion of which is contained in
this issue, is the most important ar-
ticle in the issue from the view-point
of campus discussion. Those who read
the first installment published in last
month's issue of'"Chimes" will be in:.
terested to discover just how the phil-
osophical society would better the ex-
isting deplorable conditions. Part one
contained merely a discussion of the
various campus activities and in the
April issue of the magazine, J. R.
Adams, and O. C. Johnson, of the rhet-
Foric department, joint authors of the
article, point out the remedies for the
loosely governed situation as it ex-
ists at present.
Writes on Army
Col. Oliver L. Spaulding Jr., '96L,
is the author of a most interesting ar-
ticle entitled "The Army As a Ca-,
reer". Major Robert Arthur has writ-

ten an introduction. G. E. Sloan, '23,1
expounds the need of 'a university
press .at Michigan, and illustrates his
argument with examples taken froml
universities in this country and in#
Englaid, under th'e caption, "Want-
ed - A University Press". 4
"The Spoils of War" is the title of
an article by James Hume, '23, in1
which he records the history of the
trophies which adorn the walls of the
locker room in Waterman gymnasium.!
For those who have never taken thel
trouble to enquire into the origin of
the different cups, footballs, baseballs,'
pennants, etc., the article holds no lit-
tle interest.
Three Stories
Along the line of fiction, a story
entitled "Two Italian Sketches" and
written by R. G.."Yerkes, '21, heads the
list. The scene, as the title would
suggest, is laid in Italy, and the theme
is very well worked out. "The Dead
Past" is a short story by Robert
Rothman, while Martha. Guernsey
completes the fictional section of
"Chimes" with a short story called
"Front Feathers".
The make-up of this month's issue
is consistent with the standard set by
former issues, and the cover design,
taken from a photograph of Wesbrook
pole vaulting;-is very attractive.

(By l.K.)
Featuring "Manuscripts Secured by
the University of Michigan Expedi-
tion", by'tibrarian W. W. Bishop, the
April number of the Michigan Alum-
nus is being mailed out this week.
The article contains descriptions nd
cuts of several of the more valuable'
manuscripts which were secured re-;
cently by the expedition headed by
Prof. F. W. 'Kelsey, of the Latin de-
partment.
Theatricals Reviewed1
"A Month in Student Theatricals"
praises the quality of "Bunty Pulls
the Strings", "Selina Sue", and "Top
o' th' Mornin'". A letter from Hora-
tion S. Krans, secretary of the Ameri-
can University Union at Paris, tells of
the work done by the organization and
explains its purpose.
Another of the articles is "Sheparda
of Aintab" by Stephen Van R. Trow-
bridge, which is an account of the
work done by Dr. Fred D. Shepard,
'81M, noted for his work in the Near
East at the hospital of the American
college at' Aintab. There is also a
preface by Prof. F. W. Kelsey.
Has Editorials
The magazine also contains a reso-
intion in appreciation of the late Wil-
lard Titus Barbour, 'OSL, formerly a
professor in the Law school, which
was recently adopted by the Univer-
sity senate. Two letters appear which
deal with the Alumni fund and the
proposed "One - percenters" club.
"Some Results of the Intelligence'
Tests", taken from the report of Prof.
Guy M. Whipple, of the sociology de-'
partment, and "An Old Composite Pic-
ture of the Science Faculty", together
with the usual departments and edi-
torials make up the magazine.

Figures for the Summer session
1919 place the enrollment at 1,961,
present enrollment being 2,194.
rollment in the Homoeopathic Train
School for Nurses and the Pharmd
college is practically the same as
year. At the present time 362
dents are enrolled in the Law scb
a decrease of 20 over last.year.
same is true of the University Tr
ing School for Nurses with a pres
enrollment of 147, which had 188
year.
REEVES ENDORSES
RUSSIAN POLIC
"I am thoroughly and heartily
favor of Secretary Hughes' policy
ward the Russian soviet governme
said Prof. Jesse S. Reeves, of the1
itical science department, in an it
view yesterday afternoon.
Professor Reeves stated that the
fair was too big to go into all the
tails but that the whole thing hin
upon the matter of reciprocity.
tering into trade relations with Rv
would mean official recognition of
soviet. We cannot recognize them
til they take up reciprocal relati
They must not only say that they
take up these relations, but they t
also prove that they will live u
their agreements."
PROF. REEVES TO SPEAK ON
INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY,].
"International Society and Inte
tional Law" is tloe subject of a le
to be delivered by Prof. Jesse
Reeves, of the political science dep
ment, at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow
ning in the auditorium of the Nai
Science building.
This address is one of this y
series being given under the ans
of the Graduate club, and is ope
the public.
Vibbert to Speak on Peace Trea
Prof. Charles B. Vibbert, of the
losophy department, will delive
address on "The Attitude Taken
France in Regard to the P
Treaty" at 4:15 o'clock this after

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