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April 19, 1921 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-II

BULLETI

r WHAT'S GOING ON

TUESDAY, APRIL 19, 1921.

Number 184.

r. Arthur H. Ryall, of Escanaba, Michigan, will begin a series of lec-
on the law and practice before Public Utilities Commigsions on Tues-
Lpril 19, 1921, at 4:05 p. m. in Room G in the Law building.
he course will be of interest to law students and students in Politi-
fence and Political Economy.
pril 18, 1921.'
HENRY M. BATES, Dean.
rch Club, U. of II.:
he Annual Memorial Meeting of the Research Club will be held at 8
Wednesday evening, April 20, in the Histological Laboratory of the
al School.
apelrs in commemoration of the centennials of Helmholz and Virchow
e read by Professor L. C. Karpinski, Professor C. V. Weller and Pro-
Arthur Boak.
he Club cordially invites members of the Junior Research Club, the
y of Sigma Xi, and -the Phi Sigma Biological Society to be present.
H. H. BARTLETT,,Secretary.
s Colloquium:
of, N. H. Williams will speak at the Physics Colloquium on Tues-
.prih 19, at 4:20 p. m., in Room 202, Physics building, on "Phase Re-
in Coupled Circuits". R. A. SAWYER.
non and Sophomores:
he Health Lectures required ,of Freshmen will be repeated for those
ng late and as make ups in the Natural Science Auditorium at 3, 4
30 as follows:
o. 1, April 20; No. 2, April 21; No. 3, April 22; No. 4, April 25; No. 5,
26; No. 6, April 28.
WARREN E. FORSYTHE, Director.
to -All Seniors:
ie American University Union in Europe offers its services to Univer-
raduates planning to continue their ,studies abroad. The following
has been received by this University: /
'here are probably some of your students graduating this Spring who
anning to continue their studies abroad during the summer and next
I shall, therefore, be glad if you will call their attention to the facil-
ffered for their welfare and gpidance by the American University
in Europe, at its London office, 50 Russell Square, and its Paris of-
rue de Fleurus. ,
ider another cover I am sending you the Union pamphlet, Peace se-
o. 2, containing information as to the activities of the Union. I shall
d to send a copy to any student interested, .who may send me his ad-
Yours faithfully,r
(Signed) J. W. CUNLIFFEI, Secretary."
ofessor Cunliffe may be addressed at Columbia University. Professor
ribbert,, Department of Philosophy, University of Michigan, is a mem-
the Board of Trustees and may be consulted on matters pertaining to
ion.

TUESDAY
7:00- Meeting of French play cast,
Cercle Francais rooms.
WEDNESDAY
4:15-Lecture by Prof. C. B. Vibbert,
of the philosophy department, un-
der the auspices of the Cercle Fran-
cais on "The Attitude of the French
Toward 'the Peace Treaty," room
203, Tappan hall.
7:15-Glee club rehearsal at the Un-
ion.
U-NOTICES
Mr. Henry Steffen's class in Political
Science 12 will meet at 4:15 o'clock
Wednesday.
The Glee club will rehearse at 7:15
o'clock Thursday night at the Union
/ and the Mandolin club will rehearse
there at 7 o'clock Thursday night.-'
Ohio State Adis Jujutsu Worlk
One more sport was added to the
physical education program of Ohio
State University in the form of a
jujutsu class, which was organized and
started training April 12. Mitsugi
Satow, of Sappro, Japan, has taken
the class 'for the remainder of the
school year.
Joe's Place Still Unaltered
Joe's, the place around which hangs
so many traditions of long ago, is still
,unchanged and probably will lie so for
several weeks. The board of trustees
of the Chamber of Commerce will soon
con.sider plans for minor changes in
the building.'
BUY THAT
SUIT
AT KYER'S

U. S., JAPAN, FIRM
ON YAP QUESTION
Washington, April 38. - The Amer-
ican and Japanese governments have
adopted equally firm attitudes with
respect to the status of the Pacific
Island of Yap. The diplomatic ex-
changes between them on the subject
is continuing, but those to date were
made public today both in Washing-
ton and Tokio. They consist of two
memorandums and three formal notes.
Japan, in her last communication,
received here in the closing days of
the Wilson administration, insisted
that it had been awarded a mandate
for the island by the Supreme Coun-
cil at Pars on May 7, 1919, and that
it could not agree with the American
contention that irrespective of any
award of mandates other nations
should have free atcess to the island
for the landing and operation of ca-
ble.
IT replying to this note, Secretary
Hughes on April 5 stated emphatically
that the United States could not be
bound by any action either of the Su-
preme Counell or of the League of Na-
tions and that as no one had been "au-
thorized to surrender or cede" the
right of the United States in ,the is-
land the American government "could
not recognize the allocation of the
island or the vali~ity of the mandate
to Japan."

ADOITI

Ji UI

MICHIGAN WINS THREE OUT
OF FIVE SOUTHERN'GA)ES
(Continued from, Page Three)
games with the strongest nines of the
country, were not sure of the contest
until the last Wolverine was out. In
the sixth 4 runs were scored by the
Southerners as a result of two bad er-3
rors and some timely, Bits. The Mich-
igan nine threatened to overcome this,
however, in the eighth and ninth when
two men were on bases each tinie.
What looked like a hit by Vick in the
eighth and 1 or 2 runs struck John-
son and retired the Wolverines for the
third out. Karpus and Shackleford
both fanned in the ninth with men on
first and second, and the game ended
6 to 4 in Georgia's favor.
Georgia Wins.
In the second Georgia game 3 con-
secutive hits off the great Pantone
scored a run for Michigan, and Wol-
verine errors let Georgia count twice,
Ruzicka had settled down to masterful
pitching, while Pantone looked easy
for the visiting batters when the rain
interrupted the game and interfered
with Michigan's chances to even the
series with the Athenians.
Derrill Pratt left the team at At-
lanta Thursday morning, and turned
over all the coaching duties to Ray
[Fisher, who had joined the nine atl

(Continued from Page Thr
o'clock-Sigma Phi vs. Delta T
ta, Psi Upsilon vs. Phi Sigma
Delta Sigma Phi vs. Sigma Ch
At 1,_o'alock Saturday-Thet
Alpha Rho Chi, Xi Psi vs. Phi
Beta Pi vs. Alpha Chi Sigma
o'clocli-Delta Theta Phi vs.
Nu Sigma. Nu vs. Delta Sigm
Alpha Kappa Kappa vs. Alpha
At 7 o'clock Monday night-P
Sigma will meet Sigma Delta B
a diamond to be announced la
It is planned to run all game
tournament on the diamonds u
Ferry field with the exception
in which the professional fra
are engaged. These games w
to be played in the early eveni
Ferry, field has been closed w
cessitates i shift to some of t
play grounds.
Read The Daily for Campt

4

Students
Supplies
Everythi
Safety Pi
Graham C
Blow ini

No. 10 Tomatoes. 60c per
Schultz Grocery, State St.-Adv.

C.-G.

BRUBAUGH &

can

Cincinnati.

,. .

I

,.

r

i

lust Received

"POTTERISM" by Rose Macaulay
"MAIN STREET" by Sinclair Lewis
"THE PEACE NEGOTIATIONS'' Lansing

* 3 S
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WAHR'S

U NI VER SI

P

""

AT MIT,
S ACTITITIES

nued from Page One) i
et tax covering admission
etic contests is in effect in
;es. Columbia includes un-y
the daily paper, the comic,
r night.
alists Offer Opinions
>ublication division of the
the problem of regulating
licity was the most import-
Few colleges allow cor-

known as the Press club.
t representatives of metro-,
pers are members of this
i and are under the super-
he officers of the club who
d each year. The mem-
he organization are chos-
l of their junior year in a
contest of which'New York
men are the judges. The
icetonian co-operates with
and no attempt is made by
>op" the other.
ard all official news is given'
man who is paid by the uni-
any story is misrepresent-
)irespondent the university
he editor to withdraw him.
hi supervision there is little
y for an unscrupulous re-
.pread broadcast exaggerat-
ves of some minor event
bring a college an undue
notoriety.
e Faculty Censorsldp
censorship of the college
found to exist in few. 10-
Ld where it does exist the
gazine was invariably sub-
he closest scrutiny. It was
sus of-=opinion that the stu-
should be allowed to voice
inion. Literary magazines

cians. The Princeton representative
explained tie organization of the Tri-
angle club which gives an average of
22 performances on its annual trip
through the East and Middle West.
They have a sinking fund of $65,000
which they can draw upon in case
they do not make expensesI
Entertainment Provided
Friday night the Michigan delegates
were the guests of the Michigan club
of New England at a banquet which
was held at the University club in
Boston. More than 35 alumni were
present.. The same evening a dance
was given at M. I. T. for -all the vis-
itors. Saturday night a banquet clos-
ed the Conference.
Much praise was accorded the tech-
nology men for the efficient manner in
which they planned the assembly and
the hospitality shown the visitors. It
was decided that the next meeting
shall be held two years hence at the
University of Pennsylvania.
MIUSIC ASSOCIATION ELECTS'
BOWEN AS VICE-PRESIDENT
George Oscar Bowen, head of the
department of music of the public
schools in Ann Arbor and head of the
department of public school music in
the University School of Music, was
elected second vice-president of the
National Association of Music Super-
visors at the recent convention in St.
Louis.
This position is considered very im-
portant because it carries with it the
editorship of all publications of the
association, including the bool of pro-
ceedings and ,the music- supervisor's
journal.
SOCIAL IWORKER WILL CONFER
WITH STUDENTS. HERE TODAY
Paul Beisser, of the New York
school of social work, will be in room
205 of the Economics building from
10 to 12 o'clock this morning to con-
fer with, students who may be inter-
ested in attending courses at the
school next year.

:W gHinnnn~inrrluua 111111HI I I llll iillllrllrnrllurllllrrulltllillllrrllul.;
! Have You a Good Photograph?
One you can use in an emergency? '
To give to the departing friend, to
exchange with the distant school
mate yobl haven't seen for years, to
use for publication.
A'Good Photograph is the
Only Kind you should give
w*
t a
PORTRAITS
QUALITY .
by
- PHOTOGRAPHY
619 E. Liberty Phone 604 W
- a11 r1 U 1 IF M1 lIi I1 1! 1E1 ll f [I l1 1111 il t1r 1U

Don't Loose Your Furs or
Woolens By Neglect or
Useless Chips

EI NOS

Sold at

6 9Quarry
Drug and Persecription Store

-Use-

Cor. N. Univ. and State Phone 308

d. Claude Drake, Prop.

r.

I

Harvard University
Graduate School of Business Administratic
A two-year course in business leading to the degree of Master of
ness Administration.

Open to college graduates.

Courses offered in the following fields: Accounting, Business Law,
king, and Finance, Marketing, Advertising, Retail Store Problems,'
Management, Industrial Management. Labor Problems, Statistics, F(
Trade, Transportation, Lumbering, Office Organization.
00 Enrolment since the establishment
of the School in 1908.
300 138 Colleges are noW represented.
E0 . -.01001I

I

I

est the students in such -
There seemed to be lit- Hold Two for Violating Liquor Laws
for a purely literary Andrew George and Peter Manos,
most of the editors 109 East Ann street, were arrested
e only way they could ex- yesterday morning by Deputy Sheriff
roduce a pictorial section Carl Arnold fo'r unlawfully selling 1,i-
iction. quor to a minor. It is alleged that
ets and concerts have re- whiskey has been offere'd for sale sey-
lassical. performances in eral times at the pool room on East
of musical clubs. By giv- Anrd street, and in making the inves-
ences what they wanted tigation it is said that a quart of Ii-
found'that the popular- quor was' purchased with marked

East 'man Kodaks - Films
i Aateur Finishing
Enlargements
Flashlights- and
a Outside Groups
ara
- _
rrtrtnanrn~ n i~n iin~i~rn~ riirr tiriri ir

-4--

3F00

I,

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09-10 70-U 111-22 UW " lA M 3814.-Z 75-38168647 17.78~

g:53

Eleven graduates of The University of Michigan have attended the
two during the present year.
The registration for 1921-'22 is limited to three hundred in the fi
courses. Applications after May 1st should be accompained by a c
transcript of the college record.
For information write to
Dean W. B. Donham, University 451
Harvard Graduate School of Business Administra
Cambridge, Massachusetts.

men waived examination and
ound over to the circuit court

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