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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 19, 1921 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

ar

LIBRARY DUISPLAYS
ANCIENT PRINTING'

es iva

Examples Showing Development
Art Will Be oni Display Until
I'Iay 15.

of

tanley's Twenty-Eighth
and Last Festival%

CIA BORI-.,
(Metropolitan Opera Company)

Soprano

PONSELLE

Soprano

(Metropolitan Opera Company)

1CE HINKLE

Soprano

CE JQHNSON KONOLD
Soprano
JNA VAN GORDON Contralto

(Chicago Opera Association)

ALCOCK

Contralto,

ES MARSHALL
(Chicago Opera Association)

Tenor

E HARROLD

Tenor

Opera Company)

MURPHY
ropolitan Opera Company)

Tenor

TON Baritone
ra Company).

Metropolitan

WORK OF GUTENBURG, AIDINE,
CAXTON,PRESSES IN EXHIBIT
Illustrations of the work of famous
printing presses from the time of their
invention until the present day have
been placed on exhibition in the lower
corridor of the Univerity Library.
The exhibition, which consists of more
than 100 books, will remain in the
cases until about the middle of May.
In Cironological Order
The arrangement of the exhibition is
chronological, beginning with the case
to the left of the main entrance, which
contains 'books printed in the "cradle"
stage of printing, before 1500. John
Gutenberg, generally conceded to be
the inventor of printing from movable
type, is represented by a facsimile
page from the famous Mazarine Bible,
printed at Mainz in 1456. There is
also a genuine leaf printed by the first
En'glish printer, William Caxton, as
well as other examples, genuine and
in facsimile, of the work of early
printers after whose type the finest
9th and 20th century craftsmen mod-
eled their own.
Another case contains books from a'
trio of noted 16th century Italian
presses, including the world-famed
Aldine press. Wo'ks of the conti-
nental houses of Estienne, Plantin and
Elzevir fill another case. These es-
tablishments show in an interesting
way the use of the printer's mark, or
device peculiar to each ,firm.
Kelmscott Press Represented
Of the English presses represented
the most famous is doubtless the
Kelmscott press;founded in 1891 by
William Mlorris, who drew his inspira-
tion very largely from the 15th cen-
tury masters of printing. He laid
great emphasis on the need of propor-
tion in the printed page between the
text, margin and decpration. The Dove
press, conducted until recently by
Cobden-Pandeson, has been a worthy
inheritor of the principles of Morris.
As far the American presses, it
would be hard to find better specimens
of typography anywhere than those
produced by the Riverside and the
Merrymount presses of Boston, accord-
ing to those who sponsor the exhibi-
tion. Private presses are well repre-
seated by two examples from the
Cranbrook press of Detroit.
EWIS SAYS NEWSPAPER
~WOR BADFOR AUTHORS
J0URNALISTIC APPRENTICESHIP
THOUGHT BENEFIIAL,
UNNECESSARY
"Among the erroe is beliefs ..of
those who contemplate becomingĀ°g pro-
fessional writers is the .myth that a
long apprenticeship in journalism is-
an essential grounding," said Sinclair
Lewis,;the author of "Main Street," in
a recent address at Princeton univer-
sity. "A newspaper training," con-
tinued Mr. Lewis, "is injurious t
those intending to write serious fiction
for'itwo ieasons. The first is that the
repoi"r:"a;sees merely the surface aspect
of life, and does not have time toin-
vestigate the details of what he sees.
We can write oly about a compara-
tively fe* subjects ,of \which' we must
have a thorough knowledge. The news-
paper man does not, hae" to gain s
thor ngh knowledge of any one .thing.
"The ther reason," SaciMr ewl
rllrr evil a~ newspaper trining for
the witer lies in the fact that etremes'

haste is required 1 journalism. This
results in the use of stereotyped
phrases, which is most detrimental to
the production of serious fiction. lie
sketchy view of llfe an, lhasty prep-
aration of copy is by no means a good
training for the novelist.'
ANN ARBOR MAN APPOINTED
BAPTIST FOREIGN MISSIONARY
New York, April 18;--Lionel G.
Crocker of Ann Arbor, Mich., was one
of nine candidates to be -appointed by
the board of managers of the Amei-
can Baptist Foreign Mission "society as
a foreign missionary. Mr. Crocker is
one of two men who will be sent soon
to Japan, where they will teach ng-
lish at Waseda university.
Mr. Crocker is a native of Ann Ar-
bor, and received his education in the
University .of Michigan, A. B., 1918,
and M. A. 1921. Hle also spent a year
as a teacher inthe University of Min-
nesota, where he was active in the I

college- religious life. While in Ann
Arbor, Mr. Crocker was- leader. of. the
Student Evangelistic band, and church
assistant.
A SHORTER
SIlORTILAND SYSTEM
IN TEN EASY LESSONS
This course covers ten easy lessons
which will enable the Student, Pro-'
fessor, Journalist, Doctor, Lawyer or
anyone seeking a professional career,
yo go thru life with 100 per cent effi-
ciency.
TIS COURSE
Is short and inexpensive,,and is
given with a money back guarantee
if not satisfied.
Send This Clipping Today
Pyramid Press: Publishers
1416 Broadway,
Aew .York City
Gentlemen:--Enclosed herewith
is $5.00 for which kindly-send
me yo'ur shorthand course in
ten easy lessons by mati. It is
understood that at the ea of
five days, I am not satisfied my
money will be g adly refunded.
Name.... ...f.i.x.
Street ....... ......
City and- State.... .
N No

and

The first and last
Word in real
pipe comfort

s sone
many styles
TkEBORPIP
ready foryo
immediate u
at six dollar

Of
of
ES
'ur
use
rrs.

a Package

during the war

I 'I

Q4ZTREBOR will smoke cool and
sweet from the start. The-ivory stop-
per at end of stem positively prevents
any bad taste or discomfort.
If you have never smoked a pipe, the
TREBOR will prove a new friend to be
proud of. A veteran pipe smoker will
appreciate the specially seasoned fine old
briar as an old friend after the first puff. N
Drop in and see the TREBOR at
The CalkinsFletcber Drug Co.,
A N D
The Cushing Drug Co.

t~

a Package

J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
The Store of Reliability & Satisfaction
113 South Main Street
ANN ARBOR, - - MICHIGAN!

The Flavor Lasts
So Does the Price!f

49

Imported by
aGROSVENOR NICHOLA$& CO., Tc.
'12 East 48th Street New York City

a 0aCkaHe
Sbeforethe war

,' 10

.

s

HARRISON Baritone

Have Your Clothes Been Sterilized?

Baritone

Yes,

If They'ye 'Been Master Cleaned

r McCANDLISS
HOLMQUIST

Baritone

11

Bass

STRUBL E

Violinist

[E BLOOMFIELD ZEISLER
Pianist
1RSITY CHORAL UNION
ALBERT A. STANLEY, Conductor
,GO SYMPHONY ORCHES-
LA
FREDERICK STOCK, Conductor
E CHORUS OF SCHOOL,
IILDREN

T HROWN in with everybody's clothes, your
garments at the cleaners pick up whatever
germs of sickness and disease there may be. And
cleaning alone does NOT remove these germs.
Only sterilizing will do it.
As a measure of health safety make sure that
your garments are thoroughly sterilized before
and after they are cleaned. It's the only way
that's free from danger.

-Al

11,

Hake It Naster Cleaned
It Costs You No More

I

I

or

GEORGE OSCAR BOWEN, Conductor

.,r.E.

Number of Course Tickets Still Available.at

$4.50, $5.00, $6.00, $7.00

CHARLES A. SINK, SECRETARY
UVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC
ANN.ARBOR, MICHIGAN

We call for and deliber

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