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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 08, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AI r-M JV1I-

re

t Mir-41--alt Dattll
FFICIAL NEWSPAPERF 0T HE UNIVERSITY
0OF MICHIGAN
blished every morning except Monday during the Univer-
r by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
e Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
-ation of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
3 in this paper. and the local news published therein.
tered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
latter.
>scription by carrier or mail, $3.50.
ices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard Street
Dres. Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
mmunications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the sig-
not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
rd notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
on of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily office.
d communications will receive no consideration. No man
will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
e Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments e
in the communications.
hat's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
GING EDITOR . . GEORGE , bROPHY 'JR
ditor ...Chesser M Camr
n Editorial Board............. .........Lee Woodruff
Editors-
T. H. Adams H. W. Hitchcock
J. I. Dakin J. E. McManis
Renaud Sherwood T. W. Sargent. fir
Editor ..................-- .....- A. Bernstein
itor... B. P. Campbell
Ls.............. T. J. Whinery, L. A. Kern, S. T. Beach
. . . . . . . . . . . . - - - -K. R o b e r t A n g e ll
's Editor ..... .... .....................M ary D.Lane
h ......................................Thomas Dewe r
?e............. Jack W. KeT

Assistants
do Frank H. MePike
r J. A. Bacon
ery W.W. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
:1 Byron Darnton
dy M. A. Klaver
altzer 1. R. Meiss
.s Walter Dnnelly
iott Beata Hasley
ain Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple'
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
Sara Waler
H. 1a. Howlett,

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
MANAGER..........LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
~........ .................D. P.Joyce
......... ...S.Kunstadter
............. ....... F.M. Heath
.. E. R. Prieh,
. ................ .......V. V. Hillery
Assistants
mbrecht M. M. Moule H. C. Hunt
el, Jr. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring
tchinson Thos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder.
ss R. G. Burcheli W. Cooley
Davis A. J. Parker
wishing to secure information concerning news for any
Daily should ae the night editor, who has full charge
to be printed that night.
FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1921.
Night Editor-BYRON DARNTON.
A MICHIGAN VACATION
sh joyously from our last classes today,;
our books and notes and wend our way
thousands of other home-goers to the sta-
e to take a temporary leave of Michigan.
quizzes, assignments, are far from our
and in their stead we picture the pleasures
that vacation will bring.
go, let us not forget the real purpose of a
President Marion L.Burton once defined
me to vacate, when we should empty our
need be), and come back strong, healthy,
retic, ready to tackle our work with re-

in the South, the track team will be upholding the
Maize and Blue on the west coast in a dual meet
with the University of California at Berkeley.
Of late years, college athletic teams have been
making more extended trips than ever before. In
192o the University of Chicago sent a baseball squad
to Japan while this year Harvard and Cornell are
going to Europe for track meets and the Waseda
university nine of Tokio is to make an American
tour, playing two games at Ann Arbor late in June.
Although games such as these with representatives
of other countries are not always practicable, the
fact of a general tendency toward more and more
intersectional contests is certainly one which should
make for good feeling among American schools and
colleges and should increase the prestige of each of
them.
Michigan is fortunate in being able to extend her
athletic activities to the Pacific this year. We are
confident that when the Maize and Blue squad
lines up against the Western contenders tomorrow,
its members will do their part in upholding Michi-
gan's honor, spurred on by the knowledge that those
back home are with them just as at Waterman gym.-
nasium or Ferry field. Moreover, although Coach
Derrill Pratt will leave us for the big leagues soon
after the spring trip, he and his men may rightly
feel the same urge. Michigan is behind her' teams
wherever they happen to be; win or lose, her stand-
ing abroad depends to a large extent on the sports-
manship and fighting qualities shown by her squads
on their yearly excursions. The nine can play in
the South with the full knowledgethat every game
is being watched in the news columns by as many
Michigan eyes as will follow the home season games
in Ann Arbor.
THE FLAG RUSH RETURNS
Decision by the faculty to permit reinstatement
of the Flag rush in this year's spring games means
that Michigan will have once more the best and
most scientific of its interclass contests as well as
the most exciting spectacle furnished by any event
on the frosh-soph program. The Flag rush is in-
comparably superior to the one-sided bag rush or
the catch-as-catch-can-rope-tying event which have
been introduced as substitutes since 1916. It re-
quires organization, speed; leadership; and as has
been proved more than once, gives the smaller side
a good fighting chance.
Theoccasional injuries which influenced Unive-
sity authorities to drop the traditional eveht i the
fall of 1916 can be avoided by a committee strong
enough to enforce the rules, and this by all means
must be attended to. With such a provision, it is
hard to see why the Flag rush should be anywhere
near as dangerous as the rough-and-tumble tying
and penning up of last spring's contest. There are
plenty of men on the campus who have seen the
rush in past years and should know how to manage
it as well as to train the opposing sides in the best
methods of attack and defense. Michigan should
not only welcome back the Flag rush, but carry it
off in a way that will assure its revival as a tradi-
tion
The Telescgpe
Somebody Forgot to Page the Undertaker
"What do you think of Ann Arbor on Sunday ?"
"I never speak disrespectfully of the dead."
The following is from the pen of the famous
German poet, Herr Nett, who is in present vogue
with women all over the world, the Boulevard ex-
cepted:
Alas, alack!
I lack a lass;
She shuns me, with a shiver.
But, why blame I,
A luckless guy,
'Cause she fell in the river?
No, Clarice, not all those long locked Lotharios
you see striding about the campus bareheaded are
freshmen. Technically, some of them are not re-

quired to wear a pot.
The original of the following little ditty entitled
"Shuffling the Spots Off the Cards" was so worded
that three Jacks beat a full house. We trust that
its author, Miss Tery, will pardon our temerity in'
revising her brain child.
The hero calmly shuffled the cards,
The villain he had stacked them,
The heroine at the hero sighed
For she was there to back him.

G

R

A

A NEW SHIPMENT OF
EXERCISES, IN CURRENT ECONOMICS--- Hailton
AT
G R A HA M
BOTH ENDS OF T HE DIAGONAL WALK

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. m., 7:05 a. m.,
8:10 a. m., and hourly to 9:10 p. M.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. mi. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. m. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and every two
hours to 9:48 p. m.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also11:00 p. n. To Ypsilanti'only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.mn., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7:50 a. m., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 APRIL 1921
S M T W T F S
1 2.
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look Just like new, wear just as
long and saves you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
OTHERS SAY:j-
WHIY IS AN AMATEUR ,
(From the Chicago Tribune)
Vernon Parks, University of Mich- I
igan baseball player, played summer
_P
ball on the Pacific coast because he b
needed money. That has been dis.
covered and it disqualified Parks as
an amateur. He canhot play ball HOM
this spring with the Michigan team.
If Parks had been a restaurant
waiter, a janitor, book salesman, a
tango teacher, or almost anything else
during the summer he would not have
lost his athletic standing, but he
would not have made much money.
He is a good ball player and as such
could make considerable money play-
ing with minor teams.
He was a student of the University F
in good standing. He was not there YOy
because he could play ball. He was
not taking a course in penmanship or
music in order to win ball games for
Michigan. He was one of the many
young men in the universities who
are not sent to school with plenty of Mild
father's money behind them. Choi
If you have a boy ambitious enough tea
to go to school and rely on himself,
at least for part of the money needed,
and vigorous enoUgh and skillful
enough to play good baseball, you are
likely to have a pretty fine young Am- C
erican, the kind you would want to
encourage.
We know that American scholaS
(Continued on Page Nine)

CORSAGES.
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end for catalog describing over 400 courses in History, English,
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how credits earned may be applied on present college program.
o STUDY DEPT. CHICAGO. tL.LINOIS

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th the holidays comes a duty, a pleasant task
.1 Michigan men and women. That task is to
lly 'prepared with informatioi concerning the
-rsity, its athletic'record, its scholastic advan-
its traditions, its activities, so that when
Is or prospective students questiop us, we
be ready with convincing answers. Vacation
s two things: opportunity to serve Michigan,
elaxation from studies.
SEEING AND LISTENING
he Inquiring Reporter" of the Chicago Trib-
m his rounds recently made it a point to ask
ersons who were in the habit of taking the
ban trains at the Randolph street station why
did not use the new subway for pedestrians
. leads under Michigan avenue at that point.
out of the five questioned, although they
I that way almost daily, did not know there
ny subway at that place; a third was aware of
istence but did not know it had been finished.
s incident illustrates a general failing on the
f a great many of us. It brings out a tendency
>f us have to look at things without really see-,
tem. Psychological experiments have shown
he average person perceives only a small per-
e of the details of newly seen objects. Even
:hings toward which we possess a great deal
niliarity, details more often than not pass un-
d and we frequently cannot say whether this
ag has eight or only six pillars across its
e; what the positions are of the figures in that
of statuary, or how the shape of the body of
ain familiar type of motor car compares with'
f another. These points are somewhat minor,
arse, but our ability to forget them is quite
cant nevertheless.
same tendency is constantly found to be true
at we hear. We are only too apt to miss the
>ints i a lecture merely through slight inat-
i to what is being said. And .how many of
remember names?
whole trouble is due largely to a mere lack,
centration and attention on the part of the
er or listener. The ability to observe is
one of the elements of personality which we,
ege, ought to cultivate. By an effort it can
de part of our equipment.
TWO TEAMS ABROAD"
le Michigan's baseball nine is on its way to-
v to begin the season with a series of games

-All Kinds of
Cheese
Ro-ufoI
Carmemlbert
Domuestic Swiss
Liederkranz
Phila.Cra
Pimento
TT Brkand4 Cream
uDelicatessen
119 E. Liberty
Phone 2620 M
11IIII llIII1111111 11 i IIII~ itiIIl tIIIII

THE
ENTURY MARKET
CALL 1091
QUICK SERVICE

"Near the King's court was a young child born
With a hey-lilli-lu and a hi-lo-lan
And his name it was called Hynd Horn
And the b irkand the broom bloorn bonny,"

j

He was born to a life of danger and adventure, suffers ban-
ishment and shipwreck but wins to happiness at last.
YOU will want to see the dramatization of this famous old
ballad of Hynd Horn presented by

Lillian

Owen's

m arionettesI

"Three Jacks have I," the villain said,
"What have you - quick - no excuses?"
But alas, all our hero had
Was an ace, a trey and three deuces.
But our hero was quick, as heroes are,
He said, "I'll beat your faces,"
So he rubbed a spot off all three two's
And then he had three aces.

"26t Best Dolls in AmerHca

Wednesday, April 13th, 8 p. m.-

Dear Noah:
Is it good luck to throw a horseshoe away?
B. Q. T.
Not always. Once the horse we were betting on
threw a shoe which didn't bring us any good luck.
Famous Closing Lines
"Rah material," he muttered as he saw the cheer-,
leader teaching the yells to the frosh.
NOAH COUNT.

Pattengill Auditorium
Ann Arbor High School

Students $1.00

Others $1.

Tickets on sale at Wahr's Bookstores

I

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