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April 07, 1921 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-07

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I of Student Publications.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
:clusivelyentitled to the use for
es credited to it or not otherwise
cal news published therein.
Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second

ruard Street.

words, if signed, the sig-
int, but as an evidence of
lished in The Daily at the
mailed to The Daily office.
no consideration. No man-
:r incloses postage.
:ndorse the sentiments ex-
b e reccrved after 8 o'clock

.TOR ............GEORGE O. BROPHY JR.
.Chesser M. Camnpbell
SBoard........................Lee Woodruff
B r . . . . H. W . Hitchcock
in J. E. McManis
aerwoed T. W. Sargent,. r
. .. . B. P. Cam pbell
. . . Whinery, . A.. Kern, S. T. Beach
...........................MRoert ALne
........ ... Thomas Dewey
... ................. .Jack W. Kely

Assistants
Frank H. McPike
J.A. Bacon
W. aW. Ottaway
Paul Watzel
Byron Darnton
M. A. Kavaer
E. R. Meiss
Walter Donnelly
Beata Hasley
Kathrine Montgomery

Sidney B. Coates
C. T. Pennoyer
Marion B. Stahl
Lowell S. Kerr
Marion Koch
Dorothy Whipple
Gerald P. Overton
Edward Lambrecht
Sara Wailer
H. U. Howlett

BIJMSLS STAFF
Telephone 960
s MANAGER............LEGRAND A. GAINES, JR.
g .. .................. P. oye
t+ . ."............S. Kunstader
U.......................................-. .MK n el
. ...................E. . Priehs
......... ..... .........-..V. F. HUillery
Assistants
ambrect Mlv. '. Moue H. . Hunt
amel, r. N. W. Robertson M. S. Goldring'
Elutieanson T hos. L. Rice H. W. Heidbreder
*oss R G. Burchell W. Cooey
.Davis A. J. Parker
na wishing to secure information concerning news for any
he Daily should we the night editor, who has fullcharge
a to be printed that night.
THURSDAY APgiL 7, 1921.
Night Editor-J. E. McMANIS.
SIZETIS
1 a new disease threatens mankind, science,
with antidotes and antitoxins, quickly man.
put the enemy to rout. Here at Michigan
are being threatened with a disease, at mal-
may "call "szetis". It" sets in when time-
.customs and traditions, of a university are
:o give way before the ever-increasing num-
students who continue to pour in from all
°the country. The best and probably the
Fective prescription which can-be made for
e is an application of the wise old maxim
Leclares that "an ounce of prevention is
pound of cure". In order that we may keep
:rom gaining a foothold here, let us strike
-oot of it all. If we can preserve our tra-
with the same respect and reverence which
ho have gone before us have, we shall suc-
our task of defeating sizetis.,
as a nation respects its traditions, we at
.n owe it as a duty to ourselves and to many
ons of, alumni to uphold our established
with the loyalty and devotion which they
. What more inspiring sight is there than
bration of Cap night, when all the classes
e once each year in Sleepy Hollow. The
nfire, the snake dance, the singing of
0 Where" by happy freshmen eagerly
g their release from the bonds of sophomore
t, and the solemn rendition of the senior
song" are memories which will never be
from the minds of those who have partici-
n these glorious ceremonies. The annual
for undergraduate supremacy between
:n and sophomores, wearing of caps and
and oaken canes by seniors, and even the
ry donning of corduroy trousers, by engi-
.re all traditions which have proved a great
e in creating that democratic, fraternal spirit
as ever characterized Michigan. Our alumni
ft us these and many other traditions as a
, and it is our duty and privilege to prove
are worthy of the trust. Our duty is to halt
before it infects the University and makes
ns mere forms from whose empty husks the
of Michigan spirit has died out.
H EN NEWSPAPERS PLAY PARIS
papers, to be successful, mus$ have the
, of big advertising contracts. The big con-
o to the papers of largest circulation. At the
time various newspapers have adopted the
of running beauty contests as a means of
ng circulation. They all have the bug from
> coast. Large and small sheets, metropoli-.'
. otherwise, are plastering their rotogravure
with girls' photos.
Ion't in the least object to girls so long as
the right girls, nor yet to photographs of
al faces so long as the faces are really beau-
d well reproduced, but there is a limit. Per-
we hate to admit that our taste in feminine
is rotten, 'but we fail to see a remote sem-
of beauty in a large per cent of the pub-
'pics". Further than this we consider it

minds of unsuspecting maidens. Think of the pos-
sibilities of future eventualities which arise every
time that a girl gets the beauty idea: dreams of
such power as Helen of Troy wielded over the
hearts and fortunes of men, high expectations, an
insensible enlargement of the ego, and then - -
tragedy when she realizes that she is a mistake in-
stead of an Aphrodite. f
The papers really should not do it. They should
protect the ignorant from the fruits of their folly.
Their moral culpability is immeasurable. Think of
the enormity of their offense. They prove by visual
evidence that the factory girl is more desirable than
the society bud, that beauty is not the hallmark of
blue blood. In short they breed disdntent all down
the line and encourage the terrible threat of bolshe-
vism.
Finally and worst of all they force the infam-
ously unpleasant adage of the great P. T. Barnum
into the foreground - an uncomfortable place to
have it.
TO OPERA WRITERS
Only two Union opera scenarios for next year
have as yet come into the hands of Director E. Mor-
timer Shuter. Neither of the two contains a single
campus scene ; both are "foreign" operas. It is
even probable, because of the great success enjoyed
by "Top o' th' Mornin'', that students are being
led to write this type in preference to a play in the
least degree localized.
There is none too much time left in which to get
out an opera, nor even to write the book to the lim-
'ited extent required for submission. Two weeks of
good hard effort will do it, and every student who
has the least ambition along this line should get
down to business at once and utilize spring vacation
to the full. The play should be selected in May so
that the composers can get to work on the music and
in order that the lines and lyrics may be worked over
in co-operation with the director.
There is every chance in the world for a student
who can write a good opera with some campus lo-
cal color. Director Shuter wants one; the alumni
in particular want one; and, no matter how ex-
cellent the "Top o' th' Mornin'" sort may be for
variety's sake at long intervals, the partially local
type should certainly be the rule. The fact that no
good local opera was turned in last spring was the
reason for accepting a purely "foreign" book; offi-
cials are prejudiced for, not against, the partially
local kind, but they must necessarily accept the best.
.There is no reason, Michigan cannot produce an-
other excellent Ann Arbor opera - that is, local in
one scene at least. , Most of the best plays in the
past have had a strong Ann Arbor touch. The prin-
cipal thing to remember is that alumni are not fa-
miliar .with the ultra-new on the campus. The
"Betsy Ros" joke in "George Did It", for exam-
ple, didn't "get across" on the road because the
alumni hadn't heard ofs the place; but"Joe's and
the Orient", as ever, brought down the house. Who's
to be the man to write an opera which will please
Michigan and the alumni houses on the trip as well?
Plenty of laurels await the playwright who turns
the trick.
TheTelescope
H'all's Well!
I read in a book of fiction
Where curious stories dwell,
+ That in Westminster tower
There hangs a much famed bell.
The story tells many incidents,
Most of which I 'diina ken'
But the thing that caught my fancy
Was, the bell was named "Big Ben".

G

DETROIT UNITED LINES
In Effect Nov. 2, 1920
Between
Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Limited and Express cars leave for
Detroit at 6:05 a. in., 7:05 a. in.,
8:10 a. in., and hourly to 9:10 p. m.
Limiteds to Jackson at 8:48 a. in. and
every two hours to 8:48 p. in. Ex-
presses at 9:48 a. m. and eN ery two
hours to 9:48 p. in.
Locals to Detroit-5:55a.m., 7:00 a.m.
and every two hours to 9:00 p. m.,
also 11:00 p. m. To Ypsilanti only,
11:40 p.m., 12:25 a.m., and 1:15 a.m.
Locals to Jackson-7: b0a. in., and
12:10 p.m.
1921 APRIL 1921
S M T W T F S
1 2
3 4 t 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Men: Last season's hats turn-
ed inside out, refinished and re-
blocked with all new trimmings
look just like new, wear justtas
long and saves; you five to ten
dollars. We do only high class
work. Factory Hat Store, 617
Packard St. Phone 1792.
BJS LINE
ADRIAN-TECUMSEH-ANN ARBOR
Central Standard Time

PUBLIC CONVENIENCE-
PRIVATE COMFORT
are two distinct features of our
auto livery service, combined
with moderate rental rates. Call
us up any time, day or night,
No. 230, and in short order one
of our cars will be at your door
ready to take you where you
will.
CITY TAXI
PHONE 230

R

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A

A NEW SHIPMENT OF
EXERCISES IN CURRENT ECONOMICS--- Hamilton
AT
GRAHALA
BOTH EN,DS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK
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ESTABLISHED I
- t-
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Telephone Murray;
Our representative wi
HOTEL STATLER,:
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Ready-made and Cust
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DETROIT
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NORTH Week
A.M.
Lv. Adrian-Main Corners........7:45
Lv. Tecumseh-Main Corners..... 8:25
Lv. Clinton-Main Corners.......8:45
Lv. Saline-Main Corners........9:35
Ar. AnnArbor-Main & Huron....io:io
SOUTH P.M'.
Lv. Ann Arbor-Huron & 4th Ave. 4:35
Lv. Saline-Main Corners........5:10
Lv. Clinton-Main Corners ....... 6:oo
Lv. Tecumseh-Main Corners...6:20
Ar. Adrian-Main Corners........7:oo

made Clothing
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ial Reductions
our Stock of
om Clothing
NEWPORT
220 BELLEVUE AVENUE

TAILORED AT PFASHIOf PARK

-bac
'. '.

'rt

Last night I dreamed of London,
And I heard the old bell chime
Its peals of stately beauty
In a sort of martial time.

But my dream was rudely broken,
And from my life went all the zest,
Big Ben in the Tower had stopped ringing
But his grandson was doing his, best.
Dear Noah:
Can you give an example of where the mineral and
vegetable kingdoms are blended to form a new com-
pound. : 1G. Ologist.
The best example of this is now extinct - Rock
and Rye.
A Crippled Squad?
The last encounter between the two sections re-
sulted in a decisive victory for the Westerners when
Ohio was humbled 28 to o by the Californria eleven.
It rests on 15 Michigan shoulders to even matters
up. - from Sunday's Daily.
And don't it make yuh kinda
Sore when you send your stuff
To one of the local laundries
And when you get it back
You discover that the other
Fellows aren't sending in any
Better shirts or collars than
You are
Famous Closing Lines
"F'orty love," murmured the tennis player reflec-
tively as he counted the cigarette lights on the slopes
of the Boulevard. NOAH COUNT.

..

KAY

- B AC



HE WEARS A
THE SKETCH

DOUBLE-BREASTED KAY-BAC SUIT
SUGGESTS iTS OWN STYLE APPEAL

PAW,- F

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READY- TO-P UT-ON

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