100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 06, 1921 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


L LEAVES PRESS

Screen

estlc-Basfi Kings story,
Earthbound." Universal com-
ly and Pathe News.
ade-Madge Kennedy in "The
ighest Bidder." Fatty Ar-
ickle in "Rough House," and
Bray Picto.

erth-Gladys Walton
olled Up." Sunshine
d Universal News.

in "All
comedy

rpheum-Pearl White in "The
White Moll." An episode of
"Velvet Fingers," and a Van-
ity Fair comedy.
THIS WEEK

Stag.
(Saturday) - "Listen
a snappy musical

itney
ester;"
)medy.

troit)-"Adam
Comstock-Gest

and
mus-

This year's issue of the Michigan
Forester, annual periodical of the for-
estry department, has left the press.
Opening with a greeting' from Prof.
Filibert Roth, to whom it is dedicat-
ed, .the magazine consists of campus
topics and news of alumni. F. X.
Schumacher, '21, president of the For-
estry club, outlines the year's pro-
gram of that organization, and Prof.
Leigh J. Young discusses the ad-
vantages of a season of field work be-
fore leaving school.
E. L. Demmon, '16, now with the
Goodyear Rubber company in the East,
Indies, discusses "Forestry and the
Rubber Industry." Reminiscences of
Camp Davis, an athletic article, and
contributed poems, together with a
directory of alumni, conclude the con-
tents.
PA1RQMENT GIVES LECTURE
IN FRENCH THIS AFTERNOON
Michael Pargmient, instructor in the
romance languaga department, twill
deliver an address on . "The Life of
Foreign Students in Paris," at 4:15
o'clock this afternoon in room 203,
Tappan hall. On account of the vast
amount of experience Mr. Pargment
has had as a student in the University
of Paris, he is reputed to be an au-
thority on the subject, and the lecture
is expected to be an interesting one.
The address, which will be delivered
in French, is given under the auspices
of the Cercle Fraucais.
The next lecture of the series will
be given by Prof. Charles B. Vibbert,
of the philosophy department, on "The
Attitude Taken by France in Regard
to the Peace Treaty," Wednesday aft-
ernoon, April 20.
Gingerich to Talk on Poe in Detroit
"Edgar Allen Poe and the Philos-
ophy of the Beautiful," is the, title of
an address to be delivered by Prof.
Solomon F. Gingerich, of the English
department, next Tuesday evening at'
the Statler hotel in Detroit. The leo-
ture will be given under the auspices
of the University Extension service.
LETS GO!
If you want to make $100 spring
vacation see Mr. Davis, 408 National
-Bank Bldg., at once. Phone 2169.-
Adv.

TODAY AND TO

After

SPRING

VA C AT ION

Lat at.

'earl

S HUBE RT
PIT TER PATER

G AR R
DETROIT
ADAM AND EVA

M R S.
PHONE 18b5

FA I L IN C'S
714 MONROE

i

2:00 - 3:30

==no"

/

THE AMUSEMENT CENTRE OF ANN ARBOR

d

I

I

ter,"
with

I:,

t (Detroit)-"Pitter Pat-
a peppyTmusical comedy,
Ernest Truex.

i

HIGH SCHOOL ACTORS HELP
D. A. R. WITH PILGRIM PLAY
Members of the Ann Arbor high
school Touchstone club, working in
conjunction with members of the Sar-'
ah Caswell Angell chapter of the
Daughters of the American Revolu-
tion, are to present a play at 8 o'clock
Friday evening in the High School
auditorium.
The play, "The Rose of Plymouth
Town," is interesting at this time be-
cause it depicts many of the scenes
enacted by the early New England
pioneers. This ydar is the ter-centen-
ary anniversary of the landing of the
Pilgrims at Plymouth.
Use the advertising .columns of The
Michigan Daily to reach the best of
Ann Arbor's buyers.-Adv.
What's "in a Name?.

TODAY AND TOMORROW
Madge Kennedy
"The Highest Bidder"
adapted from Ihe famous story "THE TRAP" by Maxi-
milian Foster. Direded by Wafllae Woreloy
Madge Kennedy, whose lovable personality comes right out
of the screen to nestle in your heart, as at this theatre in her
latest picture. It's a sparkling tale that shows Madge at her
best.
and Fatty Arbuckle in
eeRowugh House"
COMING
ATTRACTION EXTRAORDINARY
A SCENEMIC ELABORATIONt
JUST AFTER SPRING VACATION
APRIL - 20, 21, 22, 23

9)7e

A-colossal super crook drama with
The story of a girl who fought her'N
dous odds.
Not a SOUNDS THE UTTER
Serial OF THE HUMAN

IF

er try TUTTLE'S
ien you wanted a

a

4 just one-
the -Maj"

S TARTING

TODAY

fi'll[

Exactly as presented for six weeks at the Playhouse, Chicago, and at the
Astor, New York, ,at $2.00 admission prices.

I

f 't i

Abor Savings Bank
orporated 1869
d Surplus , ,000.00
th University Ave.
Cor. Main & Huron

I'

GEORGE LOANE TUCKER'S STATEMENT-
"There is a message in 'Earthbound' that the wide world is greatly and deeply
interested in. I sincerely' hope that everyone who liked my production of 'The
Miracle Man' will go to see 'Earthbound'."
MAURICE TOURNEUR'S TRIBUTE-
"The most interesting subject that has ever been screened. The production of
'Earthbound' marks a distinctive advance In the art of motion pictures."
GOUVERNEUR MORRIS DEEPLY MOVED-
"That astounding drama which yesterday passed with unutterable dignity before
our astounded.eyes! Dignity, power, passion, drama-my heart .almost stopped
beating! No great work of art has ever held me more spellbound.
BASIL KINGS
POWERFUL STORY OFTHE UNSEEN WORLD

9 i.

allll it

SI

I
I

11j

Y

.

r

'r,

-

"I .-

..

1 /

iry Lunch

ut

f

f,

-j

V

I

, ; .

11111111

H1

J

Our food is the best
Our prices are right

It Lifts the Veil 1etween
This World and the

Next

It Crosses

11111

the Border Line
of the Unknown

, ,<r
r r;
, '° '" r
,
,, ,

Hours

A vivid domestic drama of love and marriage, passion and weakness,
sin and forgiveness.

7 a. m. to sp. m.
5P. m. to7p. m.
Sundays
8 a. m. to 7:30 p. m.

"No God--No Sin

C.@
.
.
i
,'
f
t,
_;
i,

1

f,

NO Ft re e "

111111111

was the creed that bound four lives togelher, and tore 'them asunder
between the fires of loyalty and passion.
What Is The Answer From The Other Side?

Other Ni

aties including

Comedy-News and Enlarged Orchestra

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan