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April 03, 1921 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1921-04-03

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PRES

DAY AND MIGHT
SFR iYICE

129.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, APRIL 3, 1921.

PRICE

SQUESTION
DISCUSSIONS

Success Qf Last Opera Perfornances
Predicts Unusual Trip Receptions

I BRINGS TO CAPITAL
[TUDE OF EUROPE ON
LEAGUE

AT.I

N T IN ALL DAY
G WITH LEADhRS

Hint Given Regarding Definite
Proposals Which Were
.Contemplated

(By Associated Press)
Washington, April 2. - The advis-
ability of a congressional declaration
of peace with Germany, along with
various other questions involved in
the national problem of a peace set-
tlement came to the front of official
discussion here again today as a re-
sult of the notable succession of
White House conferences.
Future Diplomats Confer
Senator Knox, of Pennsylvania, for-
mer secretary of state and author of
the Republican peace resolution of the
last session of congress; Col. George
Harvey, of New Yo, selected as am-
bassador to Great Britain; Myron T.
xIerrick, of Ohio, understood to be un-
der consideration for ambassador to
France; and Stephane Luazanle, not-
ed 1trench journalist who came to ths
country with former Premier Viviani,
g Ire among those with whom the
President was closeted during the'
day. All .of those who participated
in the conferences declined to say
what definite proposals wer discussed
or to indicate what decision might be
expected.
By inference, the day's developments
were coupled with the visit of Mr. Vi-
viani, who has brought to American
officials a first hand report as to the
present attitude of the European gov-
ernments toward the League of Na-
tions and related subjects.
Might Urge Versailles Treaty
Gossip about the mission of the for-
mer premier persistently has sug-
gested that he proposes to persuade
the administration not to push its,
peace declaration, but rather to con-
sider on what basis it might accept
the treaty of Versailles.
Track Team Plore
Than Determined
Tyi o Jring Bacon
(By Staff Correspondent)
Marion, Ia., April 2.-The enthus-
iastic send-off accorded the Michigan
team before leaving for California last'
night was the principle topic of con-
versation for the Wolverines as they
speeded through Illinois and Iowa on
the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul.
"No one except members of the team'
will ever realize the pep the send-off
put into us, and we are more determ-
ined than ever to bring home the bac-
on," said Captain Butler. "Each man
on the squad will have the memory
of that wonderful occasion when com-
peting at Berkeley, and we will all
do our best not to disappoint our
backers at Ann Arbor." ,
Arriving in Chicago at 7 o'clock, the
Lear was met in busses by a railroad
official and taken to the Union de-
pot. After a few hours spent in the
loop, they left *at 10:42 o'clock for
Omaha. There is a special Pullman
car for the men, for whom special
drinking wter has been taken. To-
day's journey took the team throgh
the farming country of Illingis and

(By Mary D. Lane and Elizabeth
Vickery)
For its Irish atmosphere, varied song
hits, and chiefly for its clever dancing,
will "Top o' th' Mornin' " be remem-
-bered as the most professional opera
Mimes has yet produced.
From the rise of the curtain on'the
Blue Goose Inn through the unbeliev-
ably graceful fairy dance at the end
of the last -act, the cast had the au-
dience with them at the matinee per-
formance yesterday afternoon ai}d
MARY BRELEON
PRO'GRAM TONIGHT
Girls' Glee Club and William Wheeler
Will Also Contribute on Next
to Last Services
ADDRESS WILL BE ON SOCIAL
SERVICE AND DELINQUENCY
With an address, "Social Problems
Illustrated from Courtroom Experi-
ences", by Miss Mary M. Bartelme, as-
sistant to the judge of the juvenile
court of Cook county, Ill., and mu-
sic by the Girls' Glee club and Mr.
William Wheeler, tenor, the next to
the last Union service's program at
7:15 o'clock tonight in Hill auditor-
ium promises to be one of the most
interesting yet presented.
Speaker Well-Informed
Miss Bartelme is said to be a well-
informed and interesting speaker., er
preset position has enabled he to
study more than 4,000 cases of de-
linquent girls, since this was her es-
pecial work in the juvenile court. As
public guardian she took care of the
estates of many minors, and was often
given charge of the persons . of her
charges as well. She is a graduate
of Northwestern Law school, and
spent several years in the practice of
her profession.
Rev. Dr. Henry Tatlock, rector of
St. Andrew's Episcopal church, will,
offer the invocation and read the scrip-
tures and Mr. Leonard Brooks will be
at the organ. The complete program
folows -
Organ prelude, "Andante" (First
sonata)................Borowski
Hymn, "Come Thou Almighty King"
Prayer
Chorus, "Negro Spirituals"
a. "Deep River"
b. "Nobody Knows the Trouble
I've Seen"
Scripture lesson
Tenor solo, "My Hope Is Ever-
lasting" ...............Stainer
Address, "Social Problems Illustrated
from Courtroom Experiences".

drew laugh after laugh, encore after
encore out of the applauding crowd.
With just enough plot to hang. the
songs and dances on, and to lend in-
terest, "Top o' th' Mornin' " never lags
for a minute, showing an organization
far superior to previous operas.
Turner and Ringer Star -in Dance
As Irish boy and girl, Wiliam Turn-
er, '21, and Philip Ringer, '22, star in
a duet dance in the second act, show-
ing professional skill in the vivacity
and finish with which they execute the
intricate steps. One is reminded of
Pierrot and Pierette of "George Did
It" when Ringer flirts capriciously
with his partner in the second dance.
Perhaps equally clever are Powers
and Ringer in the "Hot Dog' hit.
Kemp Kenna, Sch. of M., and Mar-
lowe Stevens, '21E, by their vocal
superiority lift the opera far above
the usual musical comedy. Thomas
Dewey, '23, another vocal star, is as-1
sisted by a group of unusually accom-
plished clog dancers when he sings
"Satan Put a Devil in the Irish," easi-
ly one of the most popular of the
songs.
Comedians Share Honors
Hilliard Rosenthal, '21, as Miltiades
Fitzgerald, the "little faireh,' is again
at his best in "Hot Dog" and "Paris
Green Blues." Sharing honors with
Rosenthal as comedians, are George
Duffield, '21, tyrranical husband beat-1
er, and the victom, Howard Ramsey,
'21E. Equally well received*are the
ingenuous sisters from "Brodie's
Boarding School for Gurruls."
Coquettish show girls vie with the
(Continued on Page Six)
FOUR MEASURE SUP
FOR OTE MONDAY
City Will Consider New Proposed!
Charter, Bond Issue, Will
Elect Mayor
3IICHIGAN BONUS BILL UP
TO PEOPLE FOR APPROVAL
Adoption or rejection of the revis-
ed charter for the city of Ann Ar-
bor, the election of a mayor, sanc-
tion of the Michigan soldier bonus, and
authorization of the Burns park bond
issue - these are the four measures
upon which the citizens of Ann Ar-
bor will vote at the spring election
tomorrow.
In the election of city officials no
opposition is offered the Republican
candidates except in the race for the
mayoralty, where George E. Lewis,
Republican, is opposed by John W.
Dwyer, on the Democratic ticket.
Bonds for Park Proposed -
The Burns park bond proposal, if
approved, will authorize the city to is-
sue bonds to the amount of $20,000
for the purpose of quieting the title
to the land now owned by the city in
J. D. Baldwin's third addition, known
as Burns park. The bonds are to bear
interest not to exceed six per cent
and shall be payable not more than
10 years from date of issue..
The new charter; if adopted, will
simplify the city government in that
the number of elective and appointive
officers will be greatly reduced. The
charter, as proposed, calls for the
election of 11 councilmen, one from
each 8 wards and 3 at large, all of
whom will serve terms of 4 years.
These men will appoint the treasurer,.
assessor and heads of 5 departments,
under which the icity's basiness will
be transacted. The departments are:
public safety, public service, public

welfare, public business, and law.
Charter Does Not Affeet Officials
The city officials who will be elected
tomorrow will serve under either the
old or new charter, as the people
chose with the exception of the coun-
cilmen-at-large, who will not go into-
office if the new charter is adopted.
The candidates for city offices are:
For president of council, R. E. Reich-
ert; for city clerk, I. G. Reynolds; for
city assessor, H. W. Crippen; for jus-
tice of the peace, J. D. Thomas; for
councilmen-at-large, F. R. Heusel Jr.
and IH' K. Holland.
The soldier bonus, which is being
voted on in all parts of the state,
will, if approved, allow all Michigan
service men a 'bonus of $15 for each

STI1OSEP CHAMPS
IN FINA TOURNEY
FAST PLAY AND CLOSE SCORING
MARK GAME TO DECIDE
WINNERS
LAST GAME IN CLASS "B"
TAKES TWO OVERTIMES
All-Star Team Picked by Officials|
Fromn Competitors; Tournament
Well Attended
St. Joseph won the state champion-
ship of class "B" high school basket-
ball teams last night at Waterman
gymnasium by defeating Farmington,
14-23, in a game that required two
five-minute overtime periods to settle
the dispute. '
The game was fast and even through1
the first half with Banfield of Farm-
ington scoring heavily from the foul
line and Skibbe and Krieger doing the
most of the work for St. Joseph the
first half ended St. Joseph 10, Farm-
ington 10.
Rough in Second Half
' The second half was marked by
rough playing on the part of both
teams. -Ankli, of St. Joseph, was dis-
qualified on four personals. With five
minutes to g Evans tied the score
from the foul line at 17-17. Both Ban-
field and Evans missed from the foul
line. Worley took a short pass from
Skibbe' under the basket and gave his
team a two point lead. With 28 sec-;
(Continue on Page Six)
WOMEN'S BUILDING
PLANS DISCUSSED
Luncheon Attended by 6,0 Who Are7
Anxious to See Edifice Con-
structedE
DEAN BATES AND ARCHITECT
POND OUTLINE PROSPECTS
"The first thing to be done in your
campaign for a women's building is to
form the vision of the goal toward
which you are working, and for which
you encounter and surmount the many
obstacles and barriers that will beset
your ,way," was the advice of Dean
Henry M. Bates, of the Law school, in
his address at the women's annual
luncheon held yesterday in Barbour
gymnasium.1
He outlined some of the barriers the
women might expect to find in theirt
campaign, drawing upon his experi-
ence as chairman of the Union cam-t
paign committee, and advised a well<
conducted campaign of education be-
fore the actual taking of subscriptions
should be begun.
Marguerite Clark, '21, president of
the Women's league, talked upon the
spirit of the Michigan woman in con-
negtion with . this building. She said
that though the spirit was now very<
young, its birth cqming with the an-
nouncement by the Regents fallow-
ing the-luncheon of last year, that they
had a plot in mind for such an edifice,
with work and sacrifice, it would in al

few years be fully- reared and in keep-
ing with the hopes of its supporters.
Irving K. Pond, '79, architect of the,
Union, had as his subject, "The Vis-
ion." He portrayed the building as the
expression of the ideals, the thoughts,.
the very selves of the Michigan wom-
en. In this connection, Mr. Pond, who
was in the University when it first
opened its doors to women, mentioned
some of) the alumnae whom he had
known, characterising them as women
of vision who blazed tlhe way for the
greater development, which the pro-
posed building combining refinement,
and charm with strength and charact-
er will express.
More than 650 women were enter-
tained at the luncheon, which was
prepared by the women of the Con-
gregational church,' freshman women
serving. Girls' Glee club and Fresh-
man Girls' Glee club rendered appro-
priate songs,- and the various classes,
seated by tables, sang class parodies.)

Ylartial Tone To
Start Vets' Ball
The stirring notes of a bugle call
will herald the start of the grand
march -at the military ball of the Vet-
erans of Foreign Wars next Friday
night. Following a short reception,
the column will move down the Union
ballroom to the martial strains of the
32nd rivision marching song. At one
end of the ballroom will be draped
the French flag presented by D. L,
P. Hal and Mrs. Hall after whose son
the post was named, while the other
snd of the room will be decorated
with the new post colors. -
Luncheon will be served in the large.
dining room of the Union starting at
11 -o'clock. The guests will be divid-
ed into three divisions, one division
eating while the other two are danc-
ing. Entertdinment will be afforded
to thgse in the dining room by the
post quartette.
;Music will be provided by Robin-
son's orchestra, and, since all of the
tickets have already been sold, a large
attendance is expected. The patrons
will be: Dean Joseph A. Bursley and
Mrs. Bursley, Dr. L. P. Hall and Mrs.
Hall, Dean John R. Effinger and Mrs.I
Effinger, President Marion L. Burton
and Mrs. Burton, Major Robert Arthur
and Mrs. Arthur, Dean Myra B. Jordan;
and Mr. Frederick P. Jordan.
THINK BROODINC
Syracuse Professor Thought to Have
Been Temporarily Insane Due
to Dismissal
DISMISS THEORY THAT DEAN
WAS KILLED ACCIDENTALLY
(By Associated Press)
"Syracuse, April 2. - Dr. Holmes
Backwith, educator, former U. S.
army lieutenant and California bank
examiner, who shot and killed his
superior, Dean John H. Wharton, at
Syracuse university this morning be-
fore committing suicide himself, was
probably insane from brooding over
losing his position here, according to
statements . made by the authorities
and'-Chancellor James R. Gay, of the
university, late tonight..
That Beckwith had premeditated
suicide has been nearly established,
having left several letters showing his
intentio# in that respect. At frst it
was thought that Dr. Wharton had
been killed in an unsuccessful at-
tempt to prevent Beckwith's suicide,
this theory has been cast aside
- Coroner S. Ellis Crane, District At-
torney Malpaff and Chancellor Gay are
all agreed in the belief that Dr. Whar-
ton was shot following an argument
when Beckwith presented a letter in
answer to Wharton's notification that
the "university would have no needt
of Beckwith's services after the closet
of college in June".
PARKS WILL HURL +
SEMI-PRO BALL
Vernon "Slicker" Parks, ex-captain
of the 1921 Varsity'baseball team, will1
play semhi-professional baseball thisi
spring. He has signed to pitch week-
,ends for the powerful Pyotts of ,'hi-
cago. By so doing Parks can con-
tinue his studies at the University and

still remain in condition for the dia-,
mond, as he will join the Detroit Tig
ers on his graduation. in June.
The gotts are one of the strong-
est semi-pro teams in the Middle
Wec. and are managed by "Paddy"
Driscoll, former Northwestern athlet-
ic star.
H. E. PARKS WILL
HAVE BURIAL HERE
Howard E. Parks, former member
of the Ypsilanti Signal Corps Com-
pany, Michigan National Guard of the
32d division, who died Thursday in
Chicago, will be buried here at 2:30,
o'clock this afternoon. All members
of the Hall Post V. F. W., and the
University Post of the American Le-
gion are requested to attend the fu-
neral in uniform, if possible. Men
will meet at the V. F. W. Post rooms,
corner of -Main and Liberty streets, at
113 'cock.'b

LENGThY

DISCUSSION
BRING FINAL
ACTION

BOARD IN C(
DOES NOTON
ON~ COC

sTADIU4 PLAN DETAI
DISCUSSED AT LENC
Expect That Work on New St
Will Be Started Soon; No
Further Plais Made
After a lengthy discussion
night, the Board in Control of
letics could rach no definite co
sion as to the action it would ta
regard to whether Derrill Pratt,
sity baseball coach, would be all
to accept his offer from the B-
Red Sox for the coming summe:
strong arguments were advance
both sides of the question, it
unanimously voted to let the x
rest until the. first of the week,
a definite decision will be reach
Details regarding the constru
of the new stadium were disco
but -practically no further plans
made. It is expected that with
short time work can be started o
new stands.
Coach.Pratt yesterday confi
the report that he had been ten
good offer from the Boston Red
for the coming summer and anni
ed he was seriously considering t
the offer if satisfactory arranger
could be made.
-MARY M. BARTE
"There are many opportunitie
college trained people in juvenil
linquency work and i conne
with the institutions foai'delinq
and dependent children," saidk
Mary M:. Bartelme, assistant tc
judge of the juvenile court of
county, Ill., in an interview yeste
"People of high standards are n
in this work," she explained, Ii
der that the institutions td whitt
linquents are sent may be condi
upon a basis which offers the chi
a normal life.,
"In Chicago there are two sci
'Civics and Philanthropy', which
recently been affiliated with the
versity of Chicago, and the I
school, both of which give stu4
practice work in institutions, tra
them for responsible positions I:
venile court and institution wor
"Protective work is carried o
'Chicago such as that accomplishi
the Union League club, which
creased the delinquency of boy
per cent in the worst district of
cago during th six months folio
the establishing of a club forme
the same basis as that o men's <
Of the 175 workers in probation
in Chicago 100 are women."
Miss Bartelme will speak a
Union services at ':30 o'clock to
in Hill auditorium.
CHICAGO ALUMNI BULLETIN
GIVES LATEST CAMPUS 1
Late University news and a re
of campus affairs are contained i
recently published March numb
the Michigan Bulletin, styled "0
and for the Michigan mei of C
go.,,
SA feature of the Bulletin is a
tile on the election to the presi
of Yale university of James RN
Angell, '90, while prominent plh
given to the impossibility of bri
"Top o' th' Mornin' to Chicage
ing spring vacation. The resig

of Dean Victor C. Vaughan, 0
Medical school, is also touched
An editorial from The Michigan
relative to the recent honors
James Rowland Angell, '90, an(
win Denby, '96L, is printed in t
sue.
THE WEATHER
Fair and Cooler-Fresh West

I

I

Hymn, "Eventide"
Benediction

'.

Organ postlude, "Marche Trium-
phale"...............Gallaerts
May 22 Will Be Last Services -
The speaker for the last program
to be presented this year will be Mr.
George Sherwood Eddy, who will ap-
pear May 22. Mr. Eddy is a Y. M. C.
A. worker of some prominence. Iis
subject will be connected with his re-
cent visit to Europe, and it is ex-
pected that he will interpret condi-
tions there as he found them at the
time of his trip.
N J
NNRORCURHS
At the services in the Ann Arbor
churches today several sermons deal-
ing with the teachings of Christ and
their application to present day ,af-

eeches -delivered befo
on the car steps, Lar
n practicing diligent
y, and it is said th
tly worried about We
pole vaulter was co
by his enforced a
ry.
DURING VACATION
will cease publica-
Ithe eSanrin, ,aea_-

re fairs are to be delivered by the local
ry ministers.
tly The sermon at the Unitarian ch'urch
fat will be preached by Rev. Sidney S.
es- Robins and the theme will be "The
,m Origin of the First Church." The top-
at- ic of the sermon will be taken from
the work of Adolph HarnaA. on the
forces that made the Catholic church.
At St. Andrew's Episcopal church
Holy Communion services will be
, held at 7:35 and 10:30 o'clock, and at
the latter service Rev. Henry Tatlock
will speak on "Baptism of Chil-
dren".
Rev. Myron B. Shafer, of Harris-
f burg, Pa., will be the preacher at the.

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