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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 22, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

News From The Other Colleges/
iI - I

of the meeting at

Le two I

Lunches Confectionery
,ream, Delicious Sodas
lake our own Ice Cream
licited from Fraternities and
218 S. Main Phone 166

Notice to Students Desir-
iter Professional Schools.

/. ,

Princeton.-Next year's Princeton t
fellowship at Harvard has been
awarded to Sidney D. Sherrerd, '18.
The award was made by the Harvard
corporation on the recommendation
of the committee on general scholar-
ships. The Princeton fellowship, given
in 1910 by a Princeton alumnus as a
token of the friendly relations ,exist-
ing between Harvard and Princeton,
goes each year to a Princeton man
who desires to enter one of the Har-
vard graduate departments.
Dartmouth.-Darthmouth freshmen
have instituted something novel by
organizing a jazz band to play at meal
hours in the commons. The plan was
fostered by a committee and later
supported by the commons' manager,
who is arranging a definite schedule
for the musicians.
Harvard.-In a recent drive for
"Ame'rica's Gift to France" held by
20 different colleges, $1,500 was raised.
Harvard leads the list with $628,
Penn follows with $234.07, and Yale
and Cornell take third and fourth
places. Hobart was the only one to
report a 100 per cent offering.
Marquette.-The "I Hate Me Club"
has been converted into a sorority-

fraternity combination. The name of
the new club is Iota Eta Mu. Making
the egotistical person supreme, and
cultivating greater self-love are the
noble purposes of this club.
Iowa.-A big pep meeting was held
at Iowa college recently at which the
membership mystery of the "Howling
300" club was to be divulged. This
new campus organization is being
planned by the University yell leaders.
The purpose of the club is to promote
Iowa spirit.
Columbia.-Under the auspices of
the Columbia Spectator and the
School of Journalism, repiesentatives
of most of the Eastern dailies will
meet at Columbia on May 7 and 8.
Previous to the war these papers were
organized as the Intercollegiate Pub-
lications' association, but under the.
stress of war conditions it broke up.
The association will facilitate the ex-
change of stories and cuts among the
members and will serve as a connect-
ing bond between them.
Coincident with the meeting at Co-
lumbia, the Intercollegiate Newspaper
association qf the Middle Atlantic
states will meet at Rutgers college,

groups of representatives will meet to-
gether.
Columbia university has lately inau-
gurated a course in scoutcraft. In co-
operation with the Boy Scouts of
America the classes are conducted
similarly to a meeting of a scout troop
and overnight hikes to nearby camps
are taken regularly. In this way all
the principles of scouting are inter-
estingly taught to the student teach-
ers and business men, many of whom
take the course as a recreation and a
means of learning the secrets of the
great outdoors.

The sa-ving in rug wear alone will pay for
the TORRINGTON. It removes the
gritty, introdden dirt that cuts the fabric.
It brightens up the delicate colorings of
your expensive rugs and carpets and adds
yeais to their life. Free demonstration.

+ARRON
9groY -?fadored
SOFT COC
CLLIETT, PEABODY & co., INC.. TI

applying for admission to one of the professional
ie University will not only be required to present
two years of college credit (including the specific
anded for admission to the respective schools) but
ow evidence of an average scholarship for the two
east a "C" grade and not be upon the "Warned"
n" list in their final semester in the College of Lit-
nce, and the Arts.
coming from other institutions not employing' a
ngs system will be required to furnish a recommen-
the proper authority in the school from which they-

'

WASUTENAW ELECTRIC S

r

THE SHOP OF QUALITY
- 200 E. Washington

'Ph..,:278

1U

, _

VICTOR C. VAUGHAN,
Dean of Medical School
HENRY M. BATES,
Dean of Law School

WILBERT B. HINSDALE,
Dean of Homoeopathic Medical School

PORTRAIT
Personal and Distinctive

Communicationsj
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
"How do you think about the pic-
tures?" a Chinese student asked his
American friend right after a recent
lecture.' "Well, I don't know," said
his friend, "but I have always seen
pictures of the same kind represent-
ing your country. One day I saw a
picture, 'The Yellow Man and a White
irl,' in a movie; and another day i
saw some of your poor countrymen in
another picture. They are alwa'ys
villains."
This short co'nversation expresses
'the whole situation. The writer has
no objection to the pictures the lec-
turer has given. But one thing lie is
afraid of is that his country may likely
be misinterpreted, if all the pictures
representing his country are of the
same kind.
Do the Americans know how the
Chinese made thseir conception of
America? Most Chinese people, no
doubt, judge the United States by the
pictures they have seen. The writer
saw pictures of the Ford Motor Car
Co., the U. S. Asphalt Co., the Fifth
Avenue- of New York,, and President
Wilson in Paris, etc. So the conver-
sation in China runs as the following:
"Well, the United States is fine," said
the white-beard; "I shall spend all
my savings to send my son there to
study." "Yes, father," said the son
gladly, "I want to go. r like the
United States and its people."
Now it is clear what the conception
of the Americans will be when they
see the pictures of this kind..
The writer hopes that some pictures
representing the inodern China, or the
bright side of China, will be shown
some time; so that people will under-
stand each other better and like each
other. A CHINESE STUDENT.

a

k

S

t

ishingtrn Str.eet

Phone 598

"I

-r

G
4

the master diaWhvd~Pencir.
A man is judged by the
pencil hemeeps.
A well-sharpened Dixon's
Eldorado is a friend to be
proud of.K
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO.
Pencil Dept. Jersey City, N. J.
Ca ian DistributorE
. . R cDoueal & Co., Ltd. *
Torornto
4

I, ~
I'

Veen;~

If

w ou said -it
wasn'Murad, I
would know you were
only joking-one can't
mistake them-for Murads
100% pure Turkish
toacco-the world's mos
'~ wW r - -s

w

3I

(Editor's Notes-This communicati n
j was received after the writer had lis-
tened to Mr. Em ii S. Ffseher's lecture
on far western China.)
-1

Spring
-Suits
-Top Coats
-Hats

For Young Men ----

TV

fir
:1

famous tobacco for cigarettes.

Murads have that old-fashioned
Turkish taste-and upon my word,
I never bought as good a Turkish
cigarette at Cairo or Constantinople.

f

t

-Caps
-Shirts

Hart, Schaffner & Marx
Clothing
are correct in styles, come in fine
range of colors and patterns, and
are made from wool fabrics. We
invite your inspection.

SI

It is true that "ordinary
cost a trifle less.

udge for yourself-!

I

"cigarettes

-Neckwear

5

imd

rd a ph"avjarettes Lin a
.4r20

-I -' , '
. "- ^

_c

-Gloves

I
lymlm

Finest

Qualities.

REULE, CONLIN, FIEGEL CO
Home of Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes
Southwest Corner of Main and Washington Streets

.

I..'

i

IV

_° .

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