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April 20, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

L

--

MAJESTIC

Constance Talmadge will appear for
the last time today in her latest ve-
hicle. "In Search of a Sinner." In
this comedy production, the popular
star will play one of the sort of parts
in which she so excels, a dashing wid-
ow.
"In Search of a Sinner" is said to
one of the fair Constance's very best
films
, The other half of a double com-
. edy bill will consist of the Mack Sen-
ett comedy, "The Star Boarder,"
which is full of this producer's re-
nowned fun-making tactics.
THE ARCADE
"Alias Jimmy Valentine," in a screen
version, is the film in which Bert Ly-
tell will glimmer for the last times

today at the Arcade. This play by
Paul Armstrong enjoyed a long run on
the legitimate stage and was chos-
en as especially suitable for the dis-
play of the newly discovered acting
abilities of Bert Lytell.
The Christie comedy, "Fuss and Fol-
ly" will be the humorous attraction.
REGISTRAR HALL MAILS GRADES
OF FRESHMEN TO HIGH SCHOOLS
The registrar's office has been mail-
ing out the grades of freshmen to the
principals of their respective high
schools for the last few days. This
custom was started about 10 years ago
by Registrar Hall for the purpose of
informing high school principals of the
progress of graduates coming to the
University.
The Michigan Daily, the only morn-
ing paper in Ann Arbor, contains all
-the latest Campus, City and World
News.--Adv.

News From The Other Colleges

Merrill Craft to Take Naval Exam
Merrill G. Craft, ex-'22, of Grass
Lake, has been appointed as princi-
pal to take the examination for admis-
sion to the United States Naval Acad-
emy at Annapolis. Examinations will
be held in Ann Arbor on April 21.

. 0 1

WUERTH THEATRE
Sun., Mon., Tues., 18, 19, 20-
Tom Mix in "Desert Love," and
a Hank Man comedy, "The Pa-
per Hanger." Adults, 35c; Chil-
dren, 10c.
Wed., Thurs., 21, 22-George
Walsh in "The Manhatten
Knight," and comedy "Wrong
Again," starring the Hall Room
j Boys.
H UBER 'The Bird of
SDETRI Paradise"

ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7:00, 8:30, 10:00
Tues., Wed., 20, 21 - William
Duncan in. "The Silent Avenger"
No. 2, also*a feature and Mutt
and Jeff Cartoon.
Thurs., 22-May Allison in
"Almost -Married," also a news
an dcomedy.
Fri. 23-Bert Lytell in "Black-
ie's Redemption" with a news
and comedy.'
:!1il11111fli11111i t111tIIIi 11 i1t1i11111::n
GarriCkD--ro
"TEA FOR THREE"
tit.aef turu+ llt11fit 1iti111ltt1ull+ e

Syracuse University - "Say Uncle"
will be the 1920 offering of Tambour-
ine and Bones, for which a call for
tryouts has been issued. Eighty men
answered the first call. The play. is a
musical comedy in three acts, and the
cast includes 20 principals and a chor-
us of 30.
University of Illinois-Memorial trees
will be planted for Illinois men who
lost their lives in the Great War. The
tree planting exercises will be held
April 20, and impressive ceremonies
have been arranged. Five airIhes
are expected to be on hand, four
to fly at the time of the planting and
one to do stunt flying. Special cav-
alry drill, target practice and other
drill formations will also be on the
program. The Pathe Weekly will film
the event.
Vanderbilt University-Members of
the staff of the Vanderbilt Hustler
have inaugurated an Overall club in
the university. The staff is pledged
to wear overalls at classes and on the
street.
Ohio State University - Freshmen
have appeared on the campus wear-
ing the regulation cap again, due to
a resolution passed by the men's stu-
dent council. The caps were laid
aside last fall, but reappeared Satur-
day when Ohio State met Indiana in
baseball.
University of Illinois - Students
have just stage a spectacular present-
ation of Jeanne D'Arc. The play, which
is somewhat of a pageant, is an histor-
ical representation of 'the life of the
Maid of France. Costumes valued in
the thousands of dollars were used.
Work will be begun immediately on
"Perpetual Emotion," the Illinois 1920
student opera.
Ohio State University- "Mufti" the
Stroller dramatic society play was re-
ceived by an enthusiasticaudience at
its opening performance in Newark,
Ohio. The story concerns the vanish-
ing of old loves which came as an
aftermath of the War.
Harvard University-A new course,
in electric communication, consisting
in the study of the telephone, tele-
graph, hydro-phone, and radio-com-
munication, will be taught in the eig-
ineering -school next year.
Northwestern University - Initial
campaigning for the student endow-
ment fund began recently. The fund
has for its purpose the protection of
the present university budget and the
increasing of faculty salaries, and is
a part of a larger fund for the general
extension of the university.
University of Oregon - The com-
mencement play of the present season
is to be "Beau Brummel," an histor-
ical comedy, written by Clyde Fitch

THE COPPER COUNTRY CLUBI

will be a material aid to Coach Rice
in improving his crew candidates.
University of Princeton--There are
at present on exhibition in the Uni-
versity library a fine lot of illumin-
ated manuscripts ,illustrating the his-
tory of this art and ranging in date
from the fourth century to the six-
teenth. Most prominent among the
schools shown are; the Late Roman,
Syrian, Bavarian, Anglo-Saxon, and
Italian.
CRITICISES MOVIE SHOW
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
I'm nursing a grouch, Mr. Editor,
and that grouch has to do with the
movie situation here.
The other evening I saw a show ad-
vertised at one of the local moving
picture houses. Says I to myself,
"That ought to be a good picture," so
I paid good money and in I went.
Well, the first thing I noticed was
that the manager had not taken the
recent hints handed out for the show
was preceded by a string of ads guar-
anteed to drive a millionaire crazy in
these days of the H. C. of movie shows,
let alone a poor college student. Next
came a pitiful attempt to imitate the
Literary Digest's "Topics of the Day;"
then an unusually poor combination
of so-called "educational" films.
Next we were treated to one of the
poorest excuses for comedies I've seen
in many a day. Honestly, Mr. Editor,
it was so lacking in plot, action, sense
and humor that it was enough to bring
real tears into the eyes of a brass
monkey. It was far worse than the
average comedy and you know how
bad that is.
Somewhere in my past history I
have seen that picture before but when!
or where I cannot remember; it was
too long ago. It was one of the old
boys, dug up out of the scrap-heap
of some hard-up movie house, recap-
tioned and sent on its way to fool the
public. But if they want to fool the
wary public, Mr. Editor, they ought
first to remove all signs of antiquity
from the film. The age of this one!
was evidenced by the fact that the
only motor car in the play had acetyl-
ene lamps in front and their old kero-
sene assistants at the side.
The story was one of "college life,"
the kind we all used to read about.
If our producers would take some
time off and go to college once they
would rewrite more than one scenario
I'm thinking.
And the music at that show? Call
it "music" if you like. It was the old
pre-war, unemotional, shiver-my-tim-
bers kind which might do at a dist-
ance of a mile or so but which, in a
more or less crowded, theater, is ruin-
ous to ear-drums and nervous sys-
tems. Moreover, the musicians seem-
ed to need contant encouragement; a
riot of good old shuffling and stamp-
ing was apparently all that could keep
them awake and on the job. It must
be nice to get paid to watch movies.
Mr. Editor, I'm cured;' absolutely
cured. I paid good American cash to
see that show. Now I'm through. I'm
not writing this as propaganda but let
me say this, when a manager is too
-dense to use student demonstrations
of one kind or another as a criterion
in choosing his pictures, then there is
only one way to wake him up and
that is to patronize someone else.
How about it, Mr. Editor?
L. ARMSTRONG KERN.
CHORAL CLUB WILL
PERFORM IN CITY

MARLEY 21- IN.
DEVON 2V IN.
C OLLARS
CLUETT PEABODY& CO.!1C.TROY NY.
Branch Nickels Arcade
+" (LEAVERS.
PRESSERS .
*B
.0,
doe68
Vf

IT IS
firm
possible
selection

Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

cessories of charac
refinement.
It is simply a ie
well dressed men
best of its kind.

.11

1

DAVID WHIT'S
BUILDING
Park and Woodi

the purpose
to create d
opportunity;
of clothing

Ladies' Party Gowns a Specialty

(BOTH SECTIONS)

rx

I

Meet Tonight-7:00 o'clock
In the Auditorium of Lane Hall

EVERYBODY OUT!

*

TODAY-YOUR LAST CHANCE TO SEE
BERT LYTELL
IN
"ALIAS JIM MY VALE NTIN E
We don't have to explain who "Jim
my Valentine" is. He's more notorious
than Leap Year-and fully as dangerous
He's craftier than a twice-widow stalking
her third victim; and stouter of heart than
the man who marries her. The most mag
netic star of the screen in a play 4nore
famous than the Eighteenth Amendment
and many times as popular.
LET'S GO!
*TS G !BERT 'LYTE
CHRISTIE COMEDY-"FUSS AND FOLLY'

Adults-30c

Children-I Oc

for Richard Mansfield, one
world's greatest actors.

of the!

r.

I-

I

K i /

After a heart
m~eal. you'll
avoid that
stuffy feelingx
if Son chew
a stick of

WRnIGLEYS
Other benefits: to teeth,
breath.appetite, nerves.
That's a good deal to
let for 5 cents!
ed Tight-Kept Right

I

University of Southern California-
A possibility of a trip to Japan, should
the baseball team show up well, is
hoped to stimulate interest among the
baseball try-outs.
Colgate College-Students and fra-
ternities of Colgate have pledged
themselves individually to support the
honor sytem more effectively. At a
mass meeting it was brought out that
the main reason for the apparent fail-
ure of the honor system lately was the
unwillingness of the students to report
another for the violation of the code.
Massachusetts Institute of Technol-
ogy-"The Tech," the Massachusetts
Institute of Technology paper, is in-
stituting a search through its columns
for the donor of Technology's mil-
lions. Henry Clay Frick is among
those who fulfill the two conditions,
namely, that of not- being a Massa-
chusetts man or a Technology alum-
nus. This is the only clue that has
been run down so far in the mystery
of who gave the institute $7,000,000.
Columbia University-According to
plans now under way at Columbia un-
iversity a system of training similar
to that employed for, the two or three
weeks before the annual Poughkeep-
sie regatta will be introduced during
the entire season. The plan consists
of installing a training table in the
Gould boat house and also providing
sleeping quarters for the first team
and the leading substitutes.
'The practice in past years has been,
to put the Columbia oarsmen through1
a hit-or-miss regime during the early'
part of the season and have real train-
ing only in the last few weeks. The
new plan has met with the approval
of the Columbia crew authorities and

LAST
TIMES
TODAY

Carrying out their policy of bring-
ing the Upper Peninsula in closer con-
tact with the University, the Copper
Country club has- succeeded in inter-
esting the Copper Country Choral club
to such an extent that on their annual
tour they will visit Ann Arbor and will
give a performance at -Hill auditorium.
The club is unique in that it is not
organized for the purpose of making
money but purely for love of music
and the pleasure the members derive
from singing.I
Miss Hazel Silver, of Chicago, will
appear as soloist and Miss Lyle Eng-
strom,'a graduate of the University
School of Music, will act as accom-
panst.
PRESENTATION OF "L'AI
FRITZ" POSTPONED TO MAY 3
The date for the presentation of
"L'Ami Fritz," the Cercle Francais
play, has been changed to Monday,
May 3, in Sarah Caswell Angell hall,
it was announced yesterday by Mr.
Everett L. Hackes, director.' The for-
mer date, April 29, was inadvisable
because of a conference at that time
of French professors.

SHOWS

aj esti

AT

KIDDI
Ioc

2:00,3:30,
7:00,8:30

MATINE
ADULT
25c

EVENING:
ADULTS
35c

Peppy, lively, naughty, nice
Silks and spice and everything nice-
That's what this is made Out of!

CONSTANCE

T ALMADGE

IN

"IN SEARCH OF A SINNER"

EXTRA FEA T URES

MACK SENNETT COMEDY---"THE STAR
BOARDER"

AQ

TOPICS

MAJESTIC ORCHE

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