100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 12, 1919 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1919-10-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ASSEMBLY

PLAN'S

EUUU I

membership wi

i iOW

IINS

s, Iowa Aggies Hold Open House
3.. "An open house such as h s never
of been seen before," was the slogan
r adopted by Iowa State for the big
te celebration which took place last
t- night. Side-shows and "movies" were
the attractions presented, each depart-
o ment having its own exhibition.
n- --
d, Have you subscribed for the Daily?
Y- Subscribe to the Michigan Daily.

ry Amateur
e your Films

Drug Store

IN do the work

/

a"

h

I LUUIU aIr i1i1 w
Appropriations of $245,000 Make Pos-
sible Use of Steere Farm Spring{
Supply
PREVENTION OF WASTE SOUGHT
THROUGH METER INSTALLATION
Ann Arbor's old river water supply.
long a cause for complaint and a pos-
plble disease menace, has now been
entirely replaced by spring water from
Steere farm and Washington street
pumping stations.
This supply has been pronounced
pure by Dr. John S. Chambers, state
wateranalysis expert and assistant in
hygiene, and by Dr. Herbert W. Emer-
son, city water bacteriologist and as-
sistant in hygiene in charge of the
Pasteur institute.
Public Votes Change
The new source was brought to Ann
Arbor mains through two appropri-
ations, the first, of $200,000, made a
year ago, and the second, of $45,000,
made this April. Money was voted
after the people of Ann Arbor had
shown the city council in public bal-
lot that they favored the change. The
University paid no part of the expense,
of connecting up the new supply, city
taxpayers bearing all the burden.
The pure water was first pumped
into the city from the Steere farm{
,wells on July 7, and since August 6r
no river water has passed through any
city mains. The characteristics of the
new water supply are hardness and
the presence of a harmless quantity
of iron, which causes the noticeablet
taste.
Three Stations Operated 1
Water is pumped to the buildings
and mains of the city from three sta-1
tions. The main station is on the
Steere farm, three miles out South
State street, where nineteen wells arej
in operation. At this station amniotor-
driven centrifugal pump of 3,600,000r
gallons daily capacity pumps 2,800.000
gallons to the city every day. Wesh-
vington street station pumps daily 500,-
000 gallons. The pump used, capable
of caring for 2,000,000 gallons, is of the
steam-driven type, and is much tooe
large for the wells. The third sta-
tion, located near the river, can pumpE
300,000 galons daily, but is to be used
only in fire emergency.
Present Supply Ample
This gives Ann Arbor a present sup
ply of 3,300,000 gallons actually being
pumped, and a possible maximum sup-
ply of 4,400,000 gallons. According to
piyard K. Holland, of Holland, Acker-
m4an an'd Holland, the local firm of
'eugineers who made the change, this
supply js plentiful for the city at
present, nd should be large uough
for any present cal likely to be mlade,
including the demands for summer
sprinkling.
In order to make sure that the valu-
able supply will not be wasted, the
city was bonded for $75,000 for the
installation of meters, and these are
now being placed in all buildings.
Forty-five have been installed on the
campus.
Engineers Task Simple
Two years ago, when the large main

Members of the engineering men-
tors' committee have been appointed
by Dean AL E. Cooley, of theenier
ing college to serve during the term
of 1919-20. Prof. W. C. Hoad of the
civil engineering department will act
as chairman of the committee and
will have charge of mentors and as-
somblies for the freshmen.
Sophomores will be under Prof. A.
H. Lovell of the electrical engineering
department, and Prof. H. H. Higbie, of
the same department, will conduct the
junior assemblies. Prof. A. E. White
of the chemical engineering depart-
nient will supervise the senior meet-
Dates Fieed
The committeesannounces the fol-
lowing dates for the engineering as-
semblies: freshmen, every iWednes-
day at 11 o'clock; sophomores, Oct.
27, 8 o'clock; Nov. 18, 9 o'clock; Dec.
11, 10 o'clock; Jan. 16, 11 o'clock.
Juniors, Oct. 16, 8 o'clock; Nov. 7,
9 o'clock; Dec. 8, 10 o'clock; Jan. 13,
11 o'clock. Seniors, Oct. 21, 8 o'clock;
Nov. 13, 9 o'clock; Dec. 5, 10 o'clock;
J<n. '12, 11 o'clock.
Room Selected
Assemblies for sophomores, juniors,
and seniors will probably be held in
room 348, Engineering building. Any
changes will be posted on the bulle-
tin boards in the building.
Seating plans will be posted near
root 348, and every student should
consult these plans, as attendance
will be taken at each meeting.;
Excuses will be given for any class-
es with which the assemblies conflict.
It is asked by the committee-in-
charge that class officers consult with
the faculty member of the committee
before each meeting to ,arrange the
program.
; Cornell Conducts Athletic Campaign
Cornell's Athletic asociation is con-
ducting a campaign for 3,000 members
this year. The enrollment with the
association this year is more than
double that of previous years.
Indiana Has New Athletic Course
At Indiana a class in games, ath-
etics and recreation is to be organized.,
The course carries one hour credit,
and will be practical. Such games as
soccer, volleyball, tennis, basketball,
and handball will be played.

PHONES 1890-1891
WE CALL FOR AA) DELE

Suits Cleaned
&Pressed.
Cash Cards, $3.50
in trade tor $3.00

'ar

-Spruce Up

Suits
Pressed

a shirt cut with
ire as tho' coats
worn, wear an
tice the smooth-

Lyndon and Conpai
-Established 1905-
Ann Arbor's Excusive Kc
and Fiishing Shop
Eastman Kodaks and Supplies
Expert Amateur Finishig by rtost
Modern Methods

s, the drape
f the sleeves
waist.

Two Doors West of Hill A

M

wanted

Ime University Musical Society announces the

f

Extra

Con

r#

ERLESS

SeinA
,in Hill AuditorIim

/

WE

11

I

I1

was run around the outside of the city
from the reservoir on Chubb road,
northwest of town to the steel tank
onz the east side, a connection was left
open il South State street at Hill
street with a yiew to the coming
change. Taking adyantage of this, the
engineers simply turned off the main
from the old pumping station, ran a
main from Steere farm to this co$-
nection, and from there turned the new
supply of water into two channels, the
first to the reservoir and the second to
the steel tank. From these points it
is distributed through the network of
mains throughout the city.
Old Supply Dangerous
This supply of water is of great
advantage from the standpoints of con-
venience and health. According to Dr.
N. R. Smith, city chemist and bac-
teriologist, the chlorine treatment
given the old river supply sufficed to
purify it under ordinary conditions,
and only one case of typhoid was, ever
directly traced to the water supply.
When the spring floods washed down
sediment into the river, the accumu-
lation of colon germs became so great
that the chlorination did not iufflce,
and the city had to issue warnings to
boil the water, which was at times
muddy brown in color.
0. S. U. Introduces New Festival
A "Know Ohio" ightwas recently
introduced into the state university.
All students wore tags bearing the
words, "Know Ohio" with a place for
the bearer's name. The cheer-leader
directed the freshmen in learning Ohio
songs.

In a program of soli, duets, trios, and other ensemble combinations.

1. Nov. 6-ALLESANDRO BONCI
Italian Lyric Tenor, and ELEANOR BROCK, "The Southern Nightii
2. Dec. 15-NEW YORK CHAMBER MUSIC SOCII
Eleven Musicians-CAROLYN BEEBE, Pianist~'and Director; PIE
IENRIOTTE, First Violin; SCIPIONE GUIDI, Second Violin;
UEL LIFSCHEY, Viola; PAUL KEFER, 'Cellist; EMIL MIX, [
Bass; GUSTAVE LANGENUS, Clarinet; WILLIAM KINCAID,
HENRI DE BUSSCHER, Oboe; UGO SAVOLINI, Bassoon; JOS
FRANZL, French Horn,

t.

3. Jan. 23-MISCHA LEVITSKI
Pianist.
4. Feb. 28-GAROLINA LAZZARI
Metropolitan Opera Prima Donna.

11

Cleanng

I

5. Mar. 31-TRIO DE LUTECE
GEORGE BARRERE, Flute; CARLOS
KEFER, 'Cello.

SALZEDO, Harp; P.

I

In a program of soli, duets and trios.

Of

" ~ i lot

0

Season Tickets: $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, S
Mail Orders Filled in Advance in Order of Receipt
In ordering tickets please designate "EXTRA CONCERT SERIES" to av'
fusion with the regular Choral Union Series. Address orders to CHARLES A.
Secretary, University School of Music, Ann Arbor, Mich.

>. 4th

Ave.

The Michigan Daily, delivered to
your door daily except Monday, $3.50
a year.-Adv.

11

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan