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April 08, 1920 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-08

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COLD TODAY

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PRESS
DAY AND)NIGHT NS
SERVICE

X No. 138.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, APRIL 8, 1920.

PRICE THREE

t,

-E ARRESTE
PLOT AGAINST
EXI CAN STAT

The Play 's the Thing" Quite w
Applicable to "George Did It

GRAND JURY INVESTIGATES WIDE
REVOLUTIONARY
PLOT
6
CHARGES VIOLATION
OF NEUTRALITY LAWS
United States Army Authorities Play
Large Part in Discovering
Villistas' Plans
(By Associated Press).
El Paso, Tex., April 7-A widespread
revolutionary plot fostered by Villa
agents in the United States to over-
throw the' government in Mexico is
being igvestigated by the grand jury
here, it became known today.
Three persons are in jail in this
country, and a fourth was arrested by,
Mexican federal authorities at Mexi-
cali, Lower California, while attempt-
ing to smiuggle ammunition to the
revolutionists, it was stated.,
Neutrality Laws Violated
the three arrested in this country,
it was said, are accused of violating
the neutrality laws by conspiring to
foster a revolution against' a govern-
ment recognized by the United States.
According to the information ob-
tained here, the plot became known
after United States army authorities
in the bigdend district had arrested
Andrew H. Dillegas, a Mexican boy,
Concetition Tereg, and Francisco Gil-
li when they attempted to cross into
Mexico. Military authorities seized
from the pair much correspondence
from Villa agents in this country, ad-
dressed to Villa.
Claim Plot Revealed1
Federal authorities say te corre-
spondence revealed a plot of Villistas
and other revolutionists to cross into
*Lower California, seize that state and
the arms and ammunitions available
there, and then attack the state of
Sonora and Sinaloa, Mexico, while
Villa was to open a revolutionary cam-
paign in Chihualhuan.
Political Leaders Connected
Several political leaders in Sonora
also were linked with the movement,,
according to the correspondent.
Lamberto Chadez, a colonel in Vil-
la's army, was arrested at Los Angeles
through information contained in the
correspondence, and he is said to have
confessed.

(By M. K. E.)
When Shakespeare (it was he,
wasn't it,) made the remark that "the
play's the thing, he must have been
on his way home from a musical
comedy, -or its 17th century equiva-
lent. At any rate, "George Did It" in
its third night might well have serv-
ed as the occasion for hi words.
Here, however, we'll leave William
and hitch up with George.
Michigan's 1920 opera is, indeed, "a
bit of the all right." In acting, music,
scenic effects, and construction it is
every bit the equal of any one of its
three predecessors.
Se tet Makes Hard Picking
Kemp Keena, Knight Mirrielees,
Paul Wilson, Harold Lauver, Tom
GLEE CLUB MAKES.
CHANGES IN RAK
New Personnel Includes 33 Members
Who Will Start for the Coast
Tomorrow
TRIP TO TAKE 17 DAYS; 12
CITIES TO HEAR CONCERTS
Due to last minute changes and ad-
ditions,- the University Glee and Man-
dolin club has made a new and revised
list of the men who will take the
western trip.
Personnel Follows
The personnel of the club is now as
follows:
Charles R. Oslus, Jr., '20, manager;
Robert A. Campbell, faculty represen-
tative; first tenors, B. F. Ferneau, '21;
K. H. Petrie, '20; H. C. Walser, '23M;
J. H. Failing, '21; second tenors, H. o.
Fullerton, '20A; E. S. Kingsford, '21;
S. H. Riggs, '22E; J. R. Gabell, '20;
firs basses, D. D. Nash, '20 (leader);
R. R. Dieterle, '21M; C. 0. Barton,
'20E; P. J. Beatty, '22E; second bass-
es, W. L. Kemp, '22M; C. P Martz-
loff, '20; E. T. Jones, '23M; C. H. Ma-
son, '20.
First mandolins, H. T. , Corson,
grad. (leader); H. Sunley, '21L; C. H.
Mason,, '20; second mandolins, N. W.
Bourne, '22M; U. A. Carpeuter, '22M;
'third mandolin, C. B. Garlock, '20E;
guitars, F. E. Motley, '22M; J. B.
Merton, '21E; cello, M. W. Kann, '20;
violin, B. H. Bronson, '21. +.
Flute, H. V. Prucha, '21L; jazz
1iano, W. O'Donnell, '20M; trap drums,
F. H. Pierce, '22D; accompanist, B.
A. Garlinghouse, '20; F. C. Hartwell,
'22D; and Frank A. Taber, director of
the Mandolin club, will go on the
trip. William Wheeler, Glee club di-.
rector, will go as far as South Bend
only.
Will Use Private Pullman
The chosen men will leave on a
private Pullman at 8:50 o'clock to-
morrow morning to visit the 12 cities
comprising the itinerary. The trip will
require 17 days, the University sen-
ate having granted a special Extenson
of the vacation to the club members.
WESTERN RESERVE
RAISES SALARIES
(By Associated Press)
Cleveland, April 7. - Trustees of
Western Reserve university today vot-
ed to increase the salary of the fac-
ulty 40 per cent effective with the be-
,inning of the new term.
This is in addition of an increase of
25 per cent granted last June. A slight
increase of the tuition fee i certain
departments was- voted to meet in-

creased expenditures.
FACULTY MEMBERS TO ATTEND
CONVENTION IN ST. LOUIS
Prof. S. L. Bigelow, Prof. H. H. Wil-
lard and possibly Prof. F. E. Martell,
of the faculty in the chemistry depart-
ment, expect to be in St. Louis next
week at the spring convention of the
tmerican Chemical society.
Professor Willard, who is chair-
'man of the University of Michigan
Section of the American Chemical so-
iety, will give two papers discuss-
ing work done by candidates for Ph.D.
-legrees in collaboration with him;
'ne on "The Separation and Determ-
nation of Cobalt,"-from the doctor's
thesis of Dorothy Hall, '18, Ch.E., the
ther on "A. Revision of the Atomic
Weight of Antimony," from the doc-
tor's thesis of Mr. R. K. McAlpine.

Hart, Al Schirmer, and Tom Under-
wood, constitute a se-.tet trom which
it is hard to choose the foremost, Kemp
Keena and Tom Underwood have ex-
cellent voices as well as that ease of
manner so seldom to be found in ama-.
teurs. Knight Mirrielees "puts across"
his number by force of the Mirrielees'
personality which has come to stamp
him as a sort of campus Al Jolson.
Tom Hart leaves nothing to be desired
in his interpretation of the two char-
acter roles..
The leading feminine parts are well
handled by Paul Wilson and Harold
Lauver, and the very unusual dancing
of the latter in "The Girl Who Regis-
ters Love" number stamping him as a
female impersonator par excellence.
Al Schirmer's good acting made up for
a rather deficient display of bis vocal
qualities.
Ringer and Lamport Star
By far the most graceful bit of
dancing in the opera was the harle-
quin number by Phil Ringer and
"Brute" Lamport-a bit of entertain-
ment almost professional in character.
The Oriental number won deserving
applause through the well directed ef-
forts of "Sandy" Sanborn and his
three cohorts.
Paul Eaton, Ted Larsen and George
Duffield are a trio meriting praise for
able handling of minor parts.
In music "George Did It" ranks
with the most tuneful of Michigan's
operas. "The Light in Your Eyes,"
sung by Kemp Keena and Paul Wilson
carried the motif which was introduc-
ed throughout the score.
(See Number 2, Page Eight)
POLITICAL SITUATION
IN -HOLLAND DISCUSSED,

HUTCHINS BANQUET
TO OPEN iMiFWEEK
Alumni and Student Talent to Furnish
Entertainment at Dinner in
Board of Commerce
U. OF M. CLUB PLANS BUSY
WEEK FOR COULLEGE MEN
With a teachers' institute meeting
in the afternoon and a banquet in hon-
or of President Harry B. Hutchins in
the evening, of Friday, April 16, Mch"
igan week will be inaugurated as a
series of events and entertainments
gi'gen in the interest of the University
and arranged by'the members of the
University of Michigan club of De-
troit. The institute will be held in
Central and Northern high schools and
in the Board of Commerce, all public
schools being dismissed at noon in or-
der that the teachers may attend.
Students and Faculty Asked
The banquet for President Hutch-
ins will be given at 6:30 o'clock in the
Board of Commerce at $2 a plate and
will be open to all students and alhm-
ni. Members of the committee have
arranged an excellent program for the
evening. Fred G. Dewey, '92; Detroit
lawyer and former University debater,
will be toastmaster, while, the toasts
tor the women will be left to Mrs.Vera
Burridge Baits, who will take as a
subject, "Feminisms --Frivolous and
Frank." During the evening a num-
ber of speeches and musical numbers
will be given, including President
Hutchins' address on "Glancing Back-
ward," a speech by Frank D. Eamon,
president of the Detroit Bar associa-
tion and a former University debater,
on "Twenty-five Years'."
Alumni Quartette to Sing
Selections by the Alumni quartette
composed of George MacMahon.
George Becker, Waldo Fellows, and
Edward Kemp, and a solo by William
Howland will follow. Deans of all the
departments in the University have
been invited to the banquet as honor-
ary guests.
The next important event (luring the
week will be the performance of
"George Did It" in Orchestra hall Sat-1
urday night. The members of the
Opera cast will be entertained for
lunch and dinner at the University
club and a supper dance will be given
for them after the opera performance.
"Intercollegiate Day" to Close
The last day of the week will be
designated as Intercollegiate day and
will start with a luncheon at the Stat-
ler for students and alumni of this
and other universities, after which
the guests will. march to Navin field
to witness the Detroit-Ohicago ball
game. The evening's entertainment
will consist of the band bounce and
vaudeville show at Orchestra ball fol-
lowed by a supper dance. The alumni
specially urge all students who can
possibly do so to go into Detroit for
the events of Intercollegiate day.
HONORARBY FRTERIT
SELECTS 19 ENGINEERS

GRINDLEY TO HEAD
CHURCH SERVICES
Next Affair Under Auspices of Campus
Committe to be Held May 16
Robert F. Grindley, '21E, was elect-
ed yesterday to be the presiding of-
ficer of the next University church
services to be given in Hill auditor-
ium May 16, by the University services
committee, composed of men and wo-
men active on the campus. The com-
mittee is making negotiations to have
one of the prominent man of the coun-
try make the principal address.
Election of officers of the commit-
tee for next year will be made at a
banquet to be held April 21 in Lane
hall.
In the absence of Bruce I. Millar,
'20, chairman of the committee, the
meeting, yesterday afternoon at Lane
hall was in charge of C. Stewart Bax-
ter, '21.
EXTENSION WORK
TO BE DiSC.USSED'

Representatives of 28 Universities
Start extension Session Here
Today

to

DUTCH PROFESSOR TELLS
PARTIES AND EDUCATION
IN LAND

OFI

TE'HOOYER"-LLYDI

Graduate Dean Urges Students to
Wage Campaign for Candidate
"We are depending on evety Hoover
advocate to go home and in some way
bring the Hoover movement before
their own people." This statement
made by Dean Alfred H. Lloyd, of the
Graduate school, president of the
Make-Hoover-President club, sound-
ed the keynote of the meeting of that
club held Wednesday night in the.
Union.
. "The ground swell all over the
country in favor of Hoover is caused
by the conviction that he is a true
American," stated Prof. M. P. Tilley,
of the English department. "The qual-
ities of absolute independence and
unassuming personality have brought
him to the fore." -
It was further poinlted out that this
is the only Hoover club in the state,
although mbvements have been start-
ed in several other cities. Publicity
has been prepared by the committee.
and this along with the other material
can be secured at Foster's Art store
,today from 4 to 6 o'clock.
Expensive to Be Unmarried in France
Bachelors and spinsters in France
are now compelled to pay a 10 per
cent tax to the French government.

Dr. A. J. Barnouw of the Univer-
sity of Leyden, addressed a large au-
dience yesterday in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium. His subject was
changed from that of "Social Condi-
tions in Holland," which had been
announced, to "The Political Situation
in Holland."
The lecture included a summary
of the political conditions and parties,
the customs of the people, and educa-
tion in Holland. In speaking 'of the
political parties Dr. Barnouw said, "In
Holland there are three parties, name-
ly the Catholic, the Liberal, and the
Socialistic. The parties are divided
religiously, the Catholics believing
that the others are Pagans."'
"The children of Holland are over-
educated," said Dr. Barnouw. "They
are compelled to take English, French
and German, besides their own lang-
uage in the public schools. This in-
terferes with the home life, since
much of the children's time is spent
in studying."
Dr. Barnouw also spoke of the press
in his country as being very conserva-
tive.. Some of the newspapers do not
even have headlines. All such news
as divorces and marriages, which is
given so much publicity in American
periodicals, is completely avoided in
the Dutch newspapers.
COMMERCE CLUB
HOLDS INITIATION
An initiation smoker was given last
night in the Michigan Union by mem-
bers of the Commerce club. Music
was furnished by a "jazz" orchestra.
Prof. I. Leo Sharfman of the Eco-
nomics department spoke to those in
the club who will enter business at
the end of the. present school year,
saying, "Do not let yourselves be
sucked in that whirlpool of money-
making which is so often found at the
present time, but," he continued, "re-
tain some of the vision and' outlook
which you obtained here in college."
Those initiated into the organization
were: Ralph A. Hammer, '21, Seward
L. Horner, '21, Harold A. Jones, '21,
Edward S. Kingsford, '21, Frank H.
Lee, '22, Henry 0. Lovett, '21, Theo-
dore B. McKinney, '22, Eugene P.
Nowlen, '22, Donald J. Porter, '21,
Robert B. Richardson, '21, George A.
R. Schuster, '21, Frederick N. Snyder,
'21, Donald J. Thorp, '21, Robert F.
Winecke, '22.

PRESIDENT HARRY B. HUTCHINSI
AMONG MICHIGAN MEN TO TALK
The first session of the 5th annuall
meeting of the National University1
Extension association will be opened
at 10 o'clock this morning in Alumni:
Memorial hall. The membership of1
the association includes 28 unger-,
sites. According to Prof. W. D. Hen-
derson, of the University Extensionj
division, there will probably be a,
larger representation at this conven-
tion than in any that have been pre-,
viously held.
To Discuss Nomenclature ,
Director R. R. Price, of the Univer-
sity of Minnesota, will read, a paper
or. "University Extension Nomencla-
ture," at 10:30 o'clock. A discussionI
of the paper will then be led by Di-
rector L. D. Osborne, University of
Colorado, and Director J. W. Scroggs,
University of Oklahoma.
The major part of the afternoon ses-
sion, which begins at 1:30 o'clock,
will be devoted to the discussion of
"Visual Instruction by University E
tension Divisions." This subject will
be treated by Mr. W. H. Dudley, chief
of bureau of visual instruction in the
University of Wisconsin. Mr. Dudley
has had much experience in the pre-
paration and distribution of educa-
tional films.
Organ Recital on Program
There will be an organ recital in
Hill auditorium at 4:30 o'clock by
Prof. Earl V. Moore of tha 'music de-
partment of the University
President Harry B. Hutchins will
open- the evening session at 8 o'clock
with an address of welcome. Dean'
Louis E. Reber, University of Wiscon-
sin, will respond to his address. Lib-
rarian W. W. Bishop will give the ad-
dress of the evening on "The Extra-
mural Service of the University Lib-
rary." Following this address there
will be a special tour of inspection
of the Library.
Faculty and Citizens Welcome
Professor Henderson is anxious to
have all faculty members and citiz-
ens feel that they are personally in-
vited to attend any of these peetings"
of the convention, especially those
held in the evening.-
CAMPUS SHRUBS OERED
Exterior of Library to be Beautified.
by Addition of Plants
An order for more than 400 ever-
green,'hemlock and yew shrubs to be
placed about the Library, was located
yesterday by the buildings and
grounds department.
The shrubs will be set around the
entire building, special care being
taken to make the front present a
more attractive appearance, according
to the department of landscape de-
sign.
"The setting of the shrubs will in
no way effect the light in the base-
ment of the Library," was the state-
ment of Mr. H. 0. Whittemore of the
department of landscapd design. "The
amount of light will be the same as at
present."

FACULTIESOF 13.
IM ,P ORTANT STE
MEDIC, LAW, AND HO mEOP CA
DIDATES TO HAVE NEW,
REQUIREMENTS
LIT COLLEGE MEN MUS'I
SHOW "C" GRADE WOR
Students Placed on Lists as "Warn
or "On Probation" Not to Be
Admitted
Important action has been taken
the faculties of the three professio
schools on the campus, looking
ward the :improvement of work a
higher academic standards in thi
schools, stated Dr. C. W. Edmun
assistant dean of the Medical Sch
yesterday. It may be pointed out tl
technically speaking the term "scho
is applied to those professional -4
partments on the campus which
quire two years of collegiate work
admission, continued Dr. Edmun
There are only three such schools
the campus at the present tune, 1
Medical School, the Law School, a
the Homeopathic Medical School.
Reasonable to Demand "C" Grad(
The faculties of the abovo scho
have agreed that, in addition to
two years of college work which ti
require for admission, including
specific subjects which are deman
by the individual schools, the ap
cant must present evidence of h
ing maintained during the time sp
in the literary college a scholars
averaging at least a "C" grade. '1
reasonableness of this requirement
very evident, they claim, when it
emembered that students cannot gr
uate from the literary college unl
they have maintained an average of
Give Chance to Clear Record
In addition to this requireme
these schools have voted that tl
will not admit students who dur
their final semester in the literary
lege have been placed on the "wa
ed" or probation list. The justice
this requirement is also manif
school heads state, because if a a
,dent is to make good in his' prof
sional studies, he should certal
demonstrate his fitness to undert
such subjects by, maintaining a g
record in his preliminary work.
for any reason during the early p
of the student's preliminary work,
has been .unfortunate enough to
placed on the "warned" or probat
'list, under the new ruling above g
en, he has an opportunity during
last semester to clear his record
such faculty action and secu e adn
sion. to the professional school.
Action Is Important
The action which has been tal
by the three schools is an import
one and one that is bound not'only
raise the standard of work in the p
fessional schools but also that in
literary college, it was stated.
Varsity li'2en Gelt
Football lVanqu
To instill spirit into the footi
men for a strenuous spring train
period, a banquet was held last ni
at the Union for the Varsity ca

dates. Coach Prentis Douglass,
sistant Varsity mentor, told the u
that spring training was going
mean hard work and that scrimm,
would probably be held within
first week of practice. He talked
the athletic situation and urged
men to take the University and
athletic teams more seriously so t
Michigan might regain her foott
crown.
Robert ClancA field secretary of
Detroit alumni and a former '
man, spoke of the alumni plans
the coming season and expressed
desire that the student body co-op
ate with the alumni. He also I
what the alumni expected of the sq
and urged them to live up to the
pectations.
Angus G. Goetz, '22M, Varsity c
tain, acted as toastmaster anda
gave a short talk. The other speal
were Coach Mather, Arthur J. E
pus, '21E, and Herbert G. Dunj
'23. More than 40 men were p:
ent for the affair.

JUNIORS RANKING HIGHEST
CbASSES CHOSEN BY TAU
BETA PI

IN

Tau Beta Pi, national honorary fra-
ternity, for engineers, elected 19 men
to membership at a meeting held Mo-
day. The men chosen represent the
eighth of the junior class ranking
highest in scholarship.
Those elected were: Chemical eng-
ineers-T. C. Anderson, R. P. Dillon,
E. R. Johnson,. J. W. Kennedy; civil
engineers-E. F. Moore, S. D. Porter,
V. C. Steinbaugh, A. C. Heimerding-
er; electrical engineers-L. E. Frost,
L. A. Gaines, G. E. Kortin, D. A. Lew-
is, J. .H. Pilkington; mechanical eng-
ineers-L. K. Ferris, M. E. Goll, R.
H. Grindley, T. R. Gustafson, R. B.
Marshall, C. N. Johnston.
LACK OF TEACHERS NOT TO
AFFECT WASHTENAW COUNTY
Present indications are that there
will be no immediate scarcity of
teachers for rural schools in Wash-
tenaw county, according to a state-
ment received from the office of the
county 'school commissioner yester-
day.
There'will be a lack of teachers for
rural school in general this year, how-
ever.

J-HOP TO START AT 9:30
Due to the uncertainty of
nany expecting to attend the
'-Hop as to its starting time,
he Hop committee has an-
ounced that the grand march
will start promptly at 9:30j

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