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April 06, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-06

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FATHER-
fCONTINUED
1 TODAY

I

r SW taj

1Iaitg

ASSO~d

UAL: AND MNI
SER TIC.

136.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY APRIL 6, 1920.

PRICE

_ _

DISCLOSES
CH ATTITUDE
LRMAN CRISIS

SITUATION
I) IN STATE.

IS

T HAS NO
N TEUTONS
unissioners' Infor.
Hun Interven-
,led For

BULLETIN
(By Associated Press)
iiayence, April 5.-The French
troops will occupy Frankfort eary
tomorrow morning. Some detach-
ments have already started for
that region.
Paris, April 5.-The attitude of the
French government in the present
German crisis is defined and explained
in a note issued tonight. After reit-
erating that the government has no
hostile designs towards Germany, de-
siring on the contrary the resumption
of relations with that country and ex-
pressing realization of the difficult
situation of the Berlin government, the
note declares that the German govern-
ment has given way to pressure by
the militarist party "not fearing to
infringe the imperative and most sol-
emn stipulations of- the Versailles
treaty."
Intervention Uncalled For
The note continues: "All information
from the Allied missions and from the
high commissioners at Coblenz shows
that German military intervention i.
uncalled for by the situation, and it
would be attended by the gravest
dangers from the point of view of
security both for the population and
the men in the field."
The note then points out that if the
German government had carried out
the disarmament clauses of the treaty,
there would have been neither the
Kapp insurrection nor a Red army in
the Ruhr.
Advance Continues
Dusseldorf, April 5.-The advance of
Reichweir in the Ruh.r region contin-
ues and Oberhausen, Dortmund, and
Luegenscheid were occupied today.
Only a few hundred communists offer-
ed resistence to the occupation. Com-
munication with the occupied towns
has been cut.off.

V0

AIRMEN TO HEAR 4
SPEAKERS TONIGHT
Four or possibly five men well
known to University and state avia-
tors will speak at the banquet to be
given by the University of Michigan
Aeronautical society at 6:30 o'clock
tonight in the Union. Major Boots,
commanding officer of Selfridge field,
Prof. H. C. Sadler of the engineering
college, Maj. C. E. Wilson, professor
of mechanical engineering, and Prof.
F.. W. Pawlowski, professor of aero-
nautical engineering, are the ones
who will address the airmen. The club
is also trying to secure Colonel Wal-
don from Detroit to speak.
Vlans are now being formulated for
securing a plane and it Is thought
likely that the organization will be
able to get one within the next few
weeks. If it is successful in arrang-
ing for a plane, entries will be made
in the intercollegiate aviation meet
and the aerial derby to be held in
Atlantic City in June.
STUDENTS CHOSEN FOR
SERICES COMMITTEE
Elections to the University church
services committee for the year 1920-'
1921 were made recently at a meet-
ing of the present committee. The fol-
lowing representatives from the ju-
nior classes were chosen to hold office
next year: Marcella Moon, '21, Mar-
guerite Clark, '21, Robert Grindley,
'21E, Richard Losch, '21E, Chesser
Campbell, '21, and Fred Petty, '21.
The next meeting of the University
church services committee will take
place at 3 o'clock Wednesday after-
noon in Lane hall. Selection of
speakers for next year's monthly ser-
ices will be made and details for next
year's organization will be planned.
No announcement has as yet been
made of the next University union
service, which will be the last one
this year. It is expected, however, that
it will be held shortly after the Spring
vacation.
BOLSHEVIKI KILL
JAPANESE CONSUL
(By Associated Press)
San Francisco, April 5.-Japanese
Consul Ishide has been killed by the
Bolsheviki at Nikolaevsk, Eastern
Siberia, according to cable advices
received by the New World, a Japan-
ese newspaper, here today.
The same advices said that the Rus-
sian government formally has asked
the Japanese government for peace,
and the government has responded by
sending Wagoro Miura, former minis-
ter to Switzerland, to Russia to in-
vestigate.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS TO GO
ON ANNUAL TOUR FRIDAY
The classes in chemical engineering
will make their annual inspection trip
during the spring vacation, beginning
this Friday, to several factories situat-
ed in Chicago and vicinity.
"All the factories to be visited on
the proposed itinerary have been chos-
en with the intention of giving a well-
rounded viewpoint of chemical eng-
ineering activity, and in each case are
among the largest in this country,"
maid Prof. A. E..Whte of the chemical
engineering department.
Prof. W. L. Badger of the chemical
engineering department, will have

charge of the trip, and Prof. W. P.
Wood will also probably accompany
the party. Details of the itinerary
may be had from Professor Badger.
Students not in the chemical engi-
neering department who desire to
make the trip, must have special per-
mission from Professor Badger. Nec-
essary expenses will be about $40.
FREIGHT CAR JUMPS TRACK;
HOLDS UP M. C. TRAFFIC
Traffic on the Michigan Central
railroad was tied up for a short time
Sunday afternoon when a freight car
jumped the track west of Ypsilanti.
The car crossed both main line tracks,
and all trains were forced to stop
until the car was back on the track.
The tie-up lasted about two hours.
Both Wolverines were held at Ann Ar-
bor during that time..
Officials of the M. C. said Tuesday
that the snowfall did no harm as far
as had been learned yesterday. Trains
were running about on schedule.

(By H. Hardy Heth)
Perhaps somewhere in literature of
Union opera there has been a better
song than "The Light in Your Eyes"-
but we cannot remember it. Perhaps
in the usual theatrical calendar of in-
-veterate farce there has been a more
adaptable and more cleverly integrat-
ed plot, than "George Did It," but such
a one has gone unchronicled.
And the wave of eicitement always
prevalent in the atmosphere of an "op-
ening night" only added glamor to the
riot of color upon the stage. Through-
out, the production was one of color-
mixings and melody and balmy atmos-
phere, and up-to-the-minute enter-
prise, devoid for the most part of
hackneyed situation. And the audi-
ence was pleased, psychologically
stunned.
"Sandy" Wilson, starring in a song
written by himself, "You're In It,"
drew encore after encore even after
the show was nearly ended and most
people had got over being enthus-
iastic. And ,once again Knight Mir-
rielees proved himself the finished
comedian, possessing the suavity, nat-
ural vivacity and clever facial expres-
sion of a genuine farceur.
Keena Good in "Straight" Part
Kemp Keena in his "straight" part,
with no mask of character to hide be-
hind, with a frank, likable and virile
personalityvwithout any impression of
being impressed by his own impor-
tance, was especially pleasing because
of his~ singing voice.
Tom Hart lends himself admirably
to farcical abandon and coutagious
humor. His "I'm Suspicious" was a
rarity, but he drew even more laughs
in the last act as the vacuous, gilded
youth with affected miannerisms.
Act One a Novelty
Act one was a novelty. The setting
of ancient Ann Arbor was a feature in
itself, and the depth of stage gave a
metropolitan aspect as a first impres-
sion. In the interlude Paul R. Wil-
son, as the aunt, revealed lis admir-
able voice, and approached his diffi-
cult role with what was - to say the
least - delicate and artistic hand-
ling.
Here, also Tom Underwood gained
ascendency in the song "Ann Arbor
Days" which was the second tune of
the production destined to live in the
annals of college creation as a motif
embodying true Michigan spirit. The
Interlude as a piece of staging, was
remarkable. Its romantic handling
and fantastic breath of reminiscence
never lacked finese. But because of
its very isolation from the other sec-
tions of the comical tirades it would
probably not survive critics who are
skilled in all the subtleties that tickle
Broadway's satiated palate.
Ted Larsen did his interpretation
of an irate old man with the full meas-
ure of incisiveness and irony requir-
ed. Paul Eaton, as the demure co-
quette in fancy flowered gown, drew
many laughs, and Reed Bachman in
a checkered suit of "ye olden time"
put across impoi tant lines.
Last Act Colorful
The last act, a palatial rendezvous
with hangings of vivid rosp and gold
and blue, was further enhanced with
costumes that formed color effects biz-
arre and novel. Here the most finish-
ed work was done by the oriental
dancers in a rendition of "Mecca" that
was without any rough edge. The first
spontaneous applause of the evening
greeted this dance in which Irwin
Sanborn especially featured, but Karl
Velde, Jack Holden, and Ceilan Rorick
deserve equal credit. A duet dance by
Matthew Lamport as Pierrette and
Philip Ringer as Pierrot won-enthus-
iastic laurels. for the heads of these
two petit performers.

It was in this last act that George
Duffield proved he could "vamp" in
the manner of a fastidious, lophisti-
cated woman with clinging velvet
gown and.a red, red fan. All males
present in the audience announce him
"convincing."
Harold Lauver, as the Ann of the
last act, is perhaps the best straight
interpretation of the young girl that
the show contains. 1;is dance was
particularly smooth and he was back-
ed by a most able quartette.-
Schirmer Shows Ease of Manner
Last but by no means least, Albert
Schirmer as the son of an over-de-
voted uncle, crowned his "9ueen" In!
an unpretentious way that savored in-
herently of the "boy." He even struck
a melancholy note now and then when1
he did not intend to do so, which, in

Premiere Of "George Did It" Shows
Exceptional Plot, usi,' And Acting

INCOMPLETE RET.URNS SHOW JOHNS
LEADING IN CITY, COUNTY & STVOIGf PEDNTRNQ

WALK-OUT THROWS 5,000
ING MEN OUT OF
WORK

PACK-,

:I

T MURDER VERDICT

a scene of much gayety is not entirely
unsatisfactory. He has the gift of
ease and unmistakable perzonality.
All the graceful and intricate num-
bers of the chorus were filled by the
vivacious and brilliant and daintier
charms of the chorus girls. And the
lapse of time-from the days of 1859
to the ultra-civilization of Pasadena in
1916-makes a variety that is pecu-
liarly irresistible. The quaint appeal
of the days when Ann Arbor was so
lurid that the sheriff was busy with
28 different mysteries "all at once"
could not fail of appreciation and pop-
ularity among Ann Arbor personnel
of today.
But the fact remains that the last
act was the triumph, that the attempt
to do a big thing in a big way was
everywhere sustained, and that every-
one of the cast as well as E. Mortimer
Shuter, director, and Earl V. Moore,
musical director, together with Rus-
sell Barnes and George Roderick the
writers--stood upon a pinnacle of
achievement at the finale.
REAK IN SWITCHMAN
STRIKE 15 PREDICTEDj

Washington Men Convicted of Killing
Grimm, Given 25-40 Years
(By Associated Press)
Mbntesano, Wash., April 5.-Seven
men, convicted here March 13 of sec-
ond degree murder for the slaying of
Warren 0. Grimm, at Centralia during
the Armistice Day parade, were sen-
tenced to not less than 25 nor more
than 40 years -In the state peniten-
tiary by Judge John M. Wilson after
he had denied a defense motion for a.
new trial.
Judge Wilson said he could not ad-
^here to the jury's plea for leniency
for two of the defendants whose cases
he regarded as identical.
The defense's attorney gave notice
of appeal.
J. E. POWELL, '14, AWARDED
1920-11 FRENCH FELLOWSHIP
John E. Powell, '14, is among those
to receive awards from the years 1920-
1921 given out by the Society for Am-
erican Fellowships in French Univer-
sities. Powell has been awarded a
fellowship in romance philology.
These scholarships have been
awarded as a direct outcome of the
-wr, their purpose being, according to
Dean John R. Effinger, to bring about
a closer association between American
and French universities, through the
medium of an interchange of students
desiring to continue research work in
their particular branches of study.
The next award of fellowships for
1921-1922 wil be made early in 1921.
Applications for scholarships ,should
be made direct to the secretary, Dr.
1 T tRane1 5'76 Wifth avenue. New

.(By Associated Press)
Chicago, April 5.-The break in the
strike of several thousand switchmen
in the Chicago district was predicted
tonight by Vice-president Whitney of
the Brotherhood of Railroad Train-
men, who said tkat several hundred
union switchmen from many points in
the. Middle West arrived today to take
up the fight against the strikers and
that others would arrive tomorrow.
The brotherhood, has .declared the
strike illegal and is co-operating with
railroad offices in efforts to bring out
a resumption of work.
The strike partly crippled activities
at the packing plants and threw 5,000
men out of employment. Packing
house officers said that 50,000 stock
yard workers would be forced to quit
wrk tomorrow if the strike contin-
ued.
The American Railway express
company issued eight shipments to-
day.
TILLEY AND PHILLIPS TO
ADDRESS HOOVER ADVOCATES
Prof. Morris P. Tilley of the En-
lish department will speak on the
Hoover movement and Prof. Ulrich B.
Phillips of the history department will
present the plan of the campaign to
students interested in Hoover's can-
didacy at a meeting of the Make-
Hoover-President club to be held at
7 o'clock Wednesday night in room
316 of the Union.
The meeting will be in the nature
of a get-together for students who are
interested enough in the campaign to
work for Hoover in their home com-
munities during spring vacation. Lit-
erature, automobile stickers. cards.
and letter stickers will be distributed,
along with general instructions for
their use.
PROF. F. N. SCOTT INVITED TO
ATTEND ENGLISH CONFERENCE
Prof. F. N. Scott, head of the rhet-
oric department, has been honored by
an invitation to attend a conference
of professors of English at the Uni'
versity of London from July 6 to 8 of
this year.
The purpose of this world wide con-
ference is to discuss the different
phases of English composition. Pro-
fessor Scott will attend if he can se-
cure sailing accommodations.
PURDUE UNIVERSITY DEAN
WILL ADDRESS ENGINEERS
Dean C. H. Benjamin of the Purdue
university engineering college will
address engineering students at 4:15
this afternoon on "Educational Vaude-
ville." According to Dean Mortimer E.
Cooley, who will introduce the speak-
er, these lectures are amusing, inter-
esting, and highly instructive.
Classes in the engineering college
will be dismissed at 4 o'clock in or-
der that all students may attend. The
lecture is given under the auspices of
the Engineering society.

CLAIM CALIFORNIAN WILL CARRY
STATE BY MARGIN Of
40,000 VOTES
VOTE MUCH LIGHTER
THAN WAS EXPECTED
Food Administrator's Democratic
Vote Gives Him But Slight Lead
on Edwards
(By Associated Press)
Detroit, April 5.-Early returns on
today's presidential primarries indi-
cated a close race between Maj. Gen.
Leonard Wood and United States Sena-
tor Hiram Johnson, for the endorse-
ment as Republican nominee.
Returns from scattered precincts in
42 counties at midnight gave Johnson
a lead over Wood of 6,126. Herbert
Hoover, whose name was on both Re-
publican and Democratic ticket, was
leading the Democrats with a vote of
1,735 against 1,678 for Governor Ed-
wards of New Jersey, his nearest op-
ponent.
The complete figures were: 334 pre-
cincts; Republicans - Johnson 19,-
237; Wood, 13,111; Lowden, 6.,708
Hoover, 6,335; Pershing, 1,527; Simp-
son, 472; Poindexter, 302.
Democrats: 221 precincts; Hoover,
1,735; Edwards, 1,678; McAdoo, 1,477;
Bryan, 1,299; and Palmer, ' 40.
General Wood had taken a lead in
the .early reports which were ~chiefly
from rural precincts.
from cities.
The California senator carried 127
Detroit precincts which returned 18,-
960 votes against 4,738 for General
Wood, who was his closest opponent.
Senator Johnson's headquarters claim-
ed that their candidate would carry
the state by approximately 40;000. .
The reports indicate that the vote
in the rural districts and i the city1
was lighter than had been generally
expected.
ARCHITECTS PLAN
ANNUAL MAY PARTY
Plans for the establishment -of an
annual May party under the auspices
of the students of the architectural
department are being laid, it. was an-
nounced yesterday.
The May party, to be given in the
Union bal room, architects claim, will
be the big spring social function of the
year, with the J-Hop as its only rival
for splendor.
A committee composed of Henry S.
Booth, '22A, J. Robert Swanson, '22A,
John J. Esterheld, '22A, and Kenneth
Rindge, '22A, has been appointed to ar-
range for the first such function sched-
uled for May 7.
Plans for the first May party include
dancing in the Union ball room from
9 to 2 and a dinner to be served at
midnight. A seven-piece orchestra has
been secured for the occasion. The
affair will be summer formal.
"L'AMI FRITZ" POSTPONED;
TO BE PRODUICED APRIL 30
"L'Ami Fritz," the play to be pro-
duced under the auspices of the Cercle
Francais, will not be given until April
30. Because of a conflict withan im-
portant meeting which will concern
many men from the French depart-
ment, it has been deemed unwise to
have the performance on April 29, the
date previously announced.
BAND BOUNCE TO BE GIVEN
APRIL 22 IN HILL AUDITORIUM

The Varsity band will give a Band
Bounce April 22 in Hill . auditorium.
The program will be the same as that
to be offered in Detroit the following
Saturday.
MARX, '19, FORMER DAILY
MAN, VISITS ANN ARBOR

ANN ARBOR AND COUNTY S
PREFERENCE BY GOOD
MARGIN
WOOD AND HOOVER N
SECOND, THIRD PLA
Women Split Vote In Favor of
Administrator and Californii
Senator
Hiram Johnson, California can
on the Republican slate for the
idency of the United States, wa
reigning favorite in Washtenaw c
and Ann Arbor, at an early hou
morning.
Incomplete returns gave' the
West candidate the preferenceby
appears to be as safe a vote
could ask.
Only seven townships by mi
last night could give reports o
race for presidential nomina
while one of them afforded no d
count.
689 Washtenaw Vote for Johns
The figures in Washtenaw coui
reported to the county clerk, r
incomplete, gave the California
of the county's votes. Wood raj
and on the G. . p. ticket wit
while Hoover was third with22
Officials of the county were no
because of the incomplete retum
decide whether or not the vote
surpass that of any previous pri
The interest manifested in the ra
nominations, however, leads th
believe that it will not be light.
Female Vote Split
Women, who in this state ha
right of voting in presidential
tions, were taking advantage of
privilege. Their vote was appa
split between the former food a
istrator and his fellow Californ
Ann Arbor, to the surpri
boosters of Wood and Hoover
incomplete returns give Johnc
preferenice in the city also.
by a large majority. Politicia
city and county offices had the "
you-so" air, however, When th
lots with Johnson's name chec
them began to pile up.
As was expected, the distrt
city in which the University is
ed, gave Hoover a decided prefe
showing that the campus stra
taken recently was indicative
feeling among students and P
sors.
Professors Favor Hoover
Returns from the seventh wa
which reside the majority of th
fessors, gave the former food a
istrator a vote of 127. Wood wa
ond with 100.
The Democratic count, as ext
was exceedingly light, with F
reigning favorite - there. Ed
however, counted a fairly heav
lot. Bryan also came through
some good figures, indicating th
Democrats were divided on thei
ballot to a much greater exteni
was at first thought.
Evidence of a change of opini
the part of many voters in both
ty and city was ably voiced in
change of political heart. Auth
declare that a good number of :
cratic voters who are followe
Hoover, changed over to the Re
can ticket. The change, it is sa
the result of a desire to get the
nominated despite his party '
tions.
Definite totals in efther the c
.county were impossible at' an
hour this morning, due to the i
pleteness of the returns.
Repairing of President's Home
. Reroofing and repairing on the
floor of the president's home w

gun yesterday by thedeparte
buildings and grounds.

ENGINEERS N

Milton Marx, '19, former associate
editor of The Daily, visited Ann Ar-
bor yesterday. Marx is now a mem--
ber of the English faculty at Cornell
university.

All classes of the Coll
Engineering and Archi
will be excused at 4 o'clc
afternoon to attend th
ture of Dean C. H. BenjE
University Hall.
DEAN M. E. C(

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