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April 02, 1920 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-02

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 2, 1920.

PRICE

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I CAILISTS
ISEATS IN
IR HOS
OF ASSEIWBLYMEN
)WS 24 HOUR
DEBRATE
TRAITOROUS,
ES COMMITTEE
Introduced Against Po-
'ganizations with
. Members
1 1.-The five Socialist
e state assembly, Lewis
August Claessons of
nuel DeWitt and Sam-
oe Bronx, and- Charles
ings county, were ex-
ie lower house of the
ay by an overwhelm-

GYM WORK PLEASES
SCHOOLMASTERS
(By X. If.)
The twelfth annual demonstration
of gymnastic work for the Michigan
Schoolmasters' clubwhich took place
yesterday afternoon in Barbour gym-
nasium was one of the best ever pro-
duced before the club. About 200
freshmen and sophomores took part
in the demonstration and the event
was witnessed 'by about as many
more.
Freshmen and sophomores carried
off equal honors for the meet, the
judges awarding 49 points to the sec-
ond year class and 49 i-2 tp the year-
ling class. The competition was in
gymnastics, marching, folk dancing,
and apparatus work. The winning class
will receive a cup.
A graceful interpretation by the3
esthetic dancing class was especially
well received. The athletic pageant,
which was a dance of a baseball game
and a fencing contest, was also ap-
plauded. The excitement of the after-
noon was afforded by the keen rivalry
between the freshman and sophomore
classes in a handicap relay race,'the
runners having to pass between close-
ly set ten-pins without disturbing
their equilibrium.
The judges were Miss Maley, Miss
Mason, and Miss McEhlinney of De-.
troit.
..I
Variety and Versatility Noticeable in
Pre-Trip Appearance of
Organization

FOUR GAMES -OPEN
INlTERSCHOLASTIC
COURT CONTESTS,

LANSING, KALAMAZOO,
AND DETROIT N. W.
TORS

ADIRIA I
VIC. I

he next step in the fight against
Socialist party, characterized as
torous party" by the assembly
ciary committee, which recom-
ded after investigating into the
,es of disloyalty against the five
alist assemblymen that they be
ed seats in the aisembly, will be
n in the legislature tomorrow.
o Carry Out Recommendations
ls designed to carry out the rec-
endations of the committee "that
opriate legislation be enacted that
after, groups or political organi-
ne in which aliens are acceptable
embers or whose principles, poli-
or program arerresponsive to or
mined by an organization coin-'
d of persons not members of the
orate of the nation or state, shall
be privileged to occupy the posi-
of a political party on the official'
t of this state,"sare expected to be
duced in the assembly.
ports reaching here from New
that the Socialists would appeal
ie courts were given little or no
tion. Expulsion of the assembly-
the entire representation of the
list party in the legislature, came
members debated the majority
t of the judiciary committee for
y 24 hours.
INSE NIESOWILL
PEARH IN 'MONNA YANNA
pearing in a complete rendition:
onna Vanna, Maeterlink's famous
a, Hortense Nielson, dramatic
r, and impersonator, will appear
o'clock this afternoon in Univer-
Hall under the auspices of the
>rical association.
>f. Thomas C. Trueblood of the
ry department said, "Miss Niel-
vill present one of the most inter-
g entertainments of the year
she appears in Monna Vanna.
s the type of artist who, when
nee visits a community is imme-
'y called back for a return en-
vent, and- whose popularity is
increasing. Her experience in
undreds of colleges and univer-
where she has appeared has al-
been a triumph."
cnna Vanna" was chosen from
st of Miss Nielson's plays for its
y and the opportunity it offers the
for dramatic expression and for
excellence of the play itself, ac-.
ng to Professor Trueblood. "We
have chosen selections from Ib-
ut, for the fact that Madame
ner of Norway with her dramatic
any will give them at the Whit-
rithin a short time," he said.

G
3
r
r.

ONE GAME FORFEITED
BY MAN'S INELIGIBILITY
Banquet Given at Union for 175 Par-
ticipating Athletes; Mather
and Johnson Speak
Michigan interscholastic basketball
tournament opened Thursday with four
speedy games. Lansing defeated Yp-
silanti 24 to 10, Detroit Northwest-
ern won from Cass Tech, 15 to 8, and
Adrian doned Arthur Hill 27 to 1$.
TODAY'S GAMES
Morning
9:00--Holland vs. Pontiac.
10:00-Sault Ste. Marie vs. Ann
Arbor.
11:00-%-Flint vs. Escanaba.
Afternoon
1:00-Battle Creek vs. Detroit
Northern.
2:00--Lansing vs. Muskegon.
3 :00-Detroit Northwestern vs.
Adrian.
Admission to the games will be
by athletic coupon book only, for
students of the University. Mem-
bers of contesting basketball
teams will be admitted by show-
ing contestants tickets.

DEMOCRATIC CLUB
CHOOSES OFFICERS
Members of the Democratic club ef-
fected an organization and .elected of-
ficers at a meeting of the club last
night in Lane hall. The following
officers were elected: President, T.
B. Doyle, '21L; vice-presidents, Don
Wood, '20L. T. S. Dougherty, '22L, H.
W. Smith, '21L, H. A. McCown, '22L,
C. B. Stegner, '21L, and Burt McNeil,
'22M. J. Howard King, '22L, was
elected secretary and treasurer.
There were several speeches made
by prominent Democrats. Frank:
Murphy, '17L, spoke on the Democrat-
ic principles and advanced some
strong arguments in their favor. Ros-
coe Huston, '04L, also spoke along the
same lines and told several instances
of the student politics of other days.
Mayor Wurster gave #a short talk.
TEA1CHERS BEGIN
ANNUALMEE-TING.
Prof. Whipple Delivers Opening Ad-
dress Before the Michigan
Schoolmasters' Club
TODAY'S PROGRAM INCLUDES
TALKS BY TWO PROFESSORS
.Women school teachers are in-
vited to attend the annual Wom-
en's luncheon to be given Satur-
day. Tickets for - the luncheon
may be obtained at Dean Jordan's
office.

RE PUBLICAN

Name Fac. Men
Hartling . .0 40
Johnson ..1 539
Lowden ...2 409
Pjershing ..0# 9
Poindexter.0 4
Wood .....3 765
Hoover ..82 1168
Vanderlip .0 0
Total ....88 2940

Women Tot.
9 55
45 595
49 460
0 9
2 6
133 901
235 1485
2 2
475 3503

KEEN

WOOD AND EDW
TAK SECOND

Engineers
Highest
By

Favor Cal
Number of
Individual

DEMOCRATIC

Hoover ..11
Palmer ...0
McAdoo ...0-
Bryan .0.. 0
Edwards ..1
Cox ......0
Hitchcock .0
Wilson .. 0

321
13
34
26
153
4
1
1

92
4
5
2
1
0
0
0
104
579

424
17
39
28
155
4
1
1
668
4171

Total ....12 552
Grand
Totals..100 3492

INTEREST MAN
FACULTY AND
DENTS

OMEf009MNS go D2,000 OF THE 4171 BALLOTS
IN CAMPUS PRESIDENTIAL P

R. R. DLETERLE, '921M, STARS;
JAZZ MUSIC WELL RECEIVED
(By H. Hardy fleth)
Much variety - everything fittingly
chosen - perhaps these two com-
ments would suggest the versatile
merits of the Pre-Trip concert pre-
sented by the Glee, and Mandolin club

last night. Which quality may be due
as much to the managers and di-
rectors as to the artists themselves.
Yet the large audience in Hill audi-
torium was kept ever expectant be-
cause of the pleasing abilities display-
ed by the performers. The Glee club,
featuring R. R. Dieterle, '21M, as sol-
oist, scored a triumph in a war song
from "The Cross of Fire" by Bruch.
In two solos Dieterle won individual
honors which will be recognized as
fully abroad as they are on Michigan's
campus. He is a genius o, colorful
tone, a richly interpretative artist.
Glee Club Good
The Glee club was par ularly ade-
quate in "The Lamp in the West," a
descriptive composition by Parker.
and "De Sandman," a negro lullaby
by Protheroe. Both of these numbers
were done without accompaniment,
the softnests and precision of tone
thus being enhanced.
Of course the Jazz orchestra was
particularly satisfactory to the audi-
ence, their "speed" being offset by the
stunts of the individual members who
dodged the spot-light, watched their
watches, and stopped the minute the
whistle blew-as all good fellows
seem to do.
Gives Impersonation
The Mandolin club was most effec-
tive at their second appearance, "An
Bord D'un Ruisseau" by de Boisdef-
fre, while the "Medley" and "Gypsy
Love Song" by the Varsity Stringed
Sextet were received enthusiastically.
Tom Hart, '20, gave humorous imper-
sonations.,
On the whole if anything can breathe;
the spirit of cosmopolitan Michigan it
should be such a program as these
combined musical clubs selected. AndI
"the rest of us" will benefit by the
publicity they establish on the west1
coast.

The fourth game, between Kalama-i
zoo Central and Muskegon, was for-
feited to Muskegon at the end of the
first half as Kalamazoo was declared
to be playing an ineligible ian. The
officials of the M. I. A. A. decided that
in view of the ruling of that organi-
zation which required the forfeiture of
all games in which ineligible man had
played, Kalamazoo should forfeit the
gameto the -lake city.The score at
the end of the half was in Kazoo's
favor, 11 to 7.
(See Number 2, Page Six)
SYMPOSIUM DISCUSSES
MICHIGAN'S IDLE LAND
Four speakers composed the sym-
posium dealing with "The 'Peril of
Michigan's Idle Lands," which was
dealt with atdaemeeting of the Acade-
my of Science held last evening..
Prof. Carl 0. Sauer, of the geology
department, reviewed the situation,
pointing out that there 'were 16,000,--
000 ' acres in the upper peninsula, the
aftermath of the lumber orgy, and of
forest fires. He said there should be
no unused lands in the state if there
is a way to avoid such a catastrophe,
and that the answer is to be found
in a broad definite policy.
Prof. Roth Speaks
Prof. Filbert Roth, head of the de-
partment of forestry, dealt graphi-
cally with the devastation of fire. Com-
paring the bankrupt area, which to-
tals nearly two-thirds of the state,
with unnecessary back yard, Profes-
sor Roth showed that the cost of this
unpreparedness has lost the state of
Michigan $18,000,000.
An illustrated lecture by Prof. J.
F. Cox, of the Michigan Agricultural
college, stressed the value of placing
settlers on the good land. The neces-
sity of a thorough soil and economic
survey was advocated by Professor
Cox as one of the first steps to pre-
vent the placing of improper lands in
the hands of the settlers.
Reforestation Needed
"According to the Chief Forester of

Prof. Guy M. Whipple of the Experi-
mental Education department, deliv-
ered the opening address of the Mich-
igan Schoolmasters' club conference
yesterday morning when he spoke on
"How to Attend and Never Forget."
Professor Whipple attribated per-
sons' mentality mnostly to their nat-
ural capacity. He cited instancesof
people having wonderful memories and
said that of course everyone could not
have such memories but by following
certain rules of application the men-
tal capacity with which they were en-
dowed could be increased.
Supt. Frank B. Spaulding of Cleve-
land, O., was the other speaker yes-
terday morning. He talked on "Sig-
.nificant Observations on Experiences
in Helping to Provide Educational O-
portunities for Our American Expedi-
tionary Forces in France and Occu-
pied German Territory."
The classical, mathematical, com-
mercial, and modern language de-
partments held luncheons at moon. All
the departments held conferences dur-
ing the afternoon. A program similar
to that field yesterday will be held
today.$
The speakers of the morning will be
Prof. Tenny Frank, of Johns Hopkins
university on "Labor and Labor Con-
ditions," and Prof. James H. Hosic 'of
the Chicago Normal college on "The
Method of Democracy."
LOUISIANA HOPE OF
SUFFRAGE LEADERS
(By Associated Press)
New Orleans,.April 1.-Women suf-
frage leaders here predicted today that
Louisiana would be the 36th state to
ratify the women's suffrage amend-
ment. The legislature meets May '10.

An Opera In The
M'aking Similar
To A Work Shop
(By H. Hardy Heth)
Looking behind the scenes of any
production is like stepping into a car-
penter's shop to' watch a structure in-
tricately wrought. You see the mira-
cle being worked, but you also hear
the hammer blows. Just so in the
work-shop of the Union opera, "George
Did It," there is' little glamorous ab-
straction. Instead there are wood-
shavings and fresh paint and dusty
floors, and the only inspiration the act-
ors receive is the sharp word "En-
core," which means that one of them
has to appear-automatically-again.
It is a peculiar mixture of work and
play, the manner in which Sandy Wil-
son, '20, can go through his part as
"Bill Jones" and make the rest of the
cast laugh over and over again. He
will probably be called upon for every
one of his seven encores to "You're
in It" on the opening night of April
5. George Duffield, '21, also, as the
nffnnf~iinsc " "(fr5 sil ila r

Herbert C. Hoover, forme
ministf-ator, and at present
for nomination for the pre
the United States, took the
storm in the straw vote
drawing nearly 2,000 votes
4,000 ballots placed in 1
.boxes.
With his name on both th
can and Democratic ballots
mer food administrator and
gleaned a total of 1,485 of
votes cast by followers of I
lican party. His Democrati
ers gave him a total count
of 668.
Interest Keen
Exceeding all expectation
terest aroused in the straw
party nominations brought
4,171 politically inclined ie
the student body and facu
campus to support their e
From 9 o'clock in the morn
the polls opened, until 3 o'cli
afternoon they were thron
anxious supporters of the
candidates.
Counting of the votes, w
sumed four hours, began at
Early reports from the coun
announced that Hoover hel
on both tickets. During no t
count was there any eviden
more popular candidate ws
found on either ticket.
Republicans Lead
Republicans easily ou
Democrats on the campus,
total of 3,503 votes. Democ
668. Three independent vo
cast, but could not be counte
er ticket.
Supporters of the variol
dates, in the pefsonnel of t1
political clubs, were promin
the voters, eagerly graspin
portunity to do a little can
Wood Loses by 600
Supporters of Gen. Leon
held to the prediction that
di te would top the list o-
cans seeking the nomination

aifectatiou"s Olga, will Jbiess go j last count was in.Wood,

down in Michigan's history as being
second to none.
Leads Do Serious Work
Next in order of significance--in th4
workshop, at least-gcomes the oriental
dance, "Mecca," in which Irwin San-
born, '20E, stars, even when rehears-
ing in relentlessly tight trousers.
Kemp Keena, '21, and .Paul Wilson,
'21, the leads, do serious work, sing-
ing their songs in a succession of per-
fectly blended tones that relieves
every hardness.
Another man who stands well alone
is Ed. Larsen, '20, who may make his
character interpretation of an old
man into an unexpected steilar role.
Tom Hart, '20, who has the advantage
of being the first humorous feature of
the program, will do his song and
dance "I'm Suspicious" without a

easily beaten by the Califo
margin -of more than 600 v
Practically one-half of
eering votes was given tc
low engineer with 382 cot
from that school. The lits
put in the most telling blow
er with a count of 519. Tt
highest number of votes c:
individual school for any
man.
Wood was a close seco
Engineering school with 213
he dropped behind when it
was counted. The laws g
their support by a majori
votes.
Uowden Comes Four
Lowden, who was expecte
through a close - second
Hoover or Wood, dropped b
running when Johnson, ab
fornia, drew a larger vote th
pected
Edwards of New Jersey,
whose plea for personal rig
terested liquor interests, w
to Hoover on the Democr
with 153 men and one wor
for him.
The Democratic ballot wa
atively light, probably ind
proportionate strength of'
licans this year. Hoover,
yesterday publicly announce
ingness to run for the non
the Republican ticket. was

.y Addresses Assembly
Friday addressed the
's on the subject of
eir second assembly'
morning., M. E. Mc-
vas elected baseball

Dover, Del., April 1.-The women's "A .
suffrage ratification resolution went Qtte Is Good
down to defeat in the Delaware house There are'numerous others who have
of rove for reconsideration is os -personalities that will insure them
sible but leaders generally conceded success. Conspicuous among these
are Al Schirmer, '22E, and Knight
that the hope for affirmativeaction Merrielees, '20E, who work artic
was a forlorn one. larly well when appearing together
on the stage, and Harold Lauver, '22E,
1n. E. Church to Observe Good Friday who has for a background one of the
The First Methodist church will ob- finest quartettes in the show.,
serve Good Friday today by a special Mr. E. Mortimer Shuter is going to
service, consisting chiefly of music. make a vast success of his latest pro-
Leonard Brooks, '22L, is the organist. I duction-and he knows it. For he
A quartette composed of Mrs. Wil- laughs a lot and is sometimes caught
Ham Wheeler, Dorothy Paton, Joseph1 whistling a bit from the premier song,
Failing, and Richmond Gardner, will "Loyelight."' That is a very good sign
sing. The student body is invited to '-when a director, in the last week of
. 44 -

I

____________________________ ~ I

Opera Orchestra Needs Viol Player the United States," said Prof. P. S.
Thec Michigan Union Opera orchestra Lovejoy, "15 years from now it will
> in need of a bass viol player. Any- be impossible to duplicate the hous-
ne desiring to play in the opera is ing facilities erected for munition
equested to call Louis Schmaler. at plants and cantonments during the

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