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April 01, 1920 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4 a 11 V a1 Via 11 \Jj 7j \ L/

H ITN EY
TO-N ITE

CHARGES DIRECTED AGINST GENERAL WOOD RIEFUTED

The Stage

9 10 11 12 13
6 17 18 19 20
3. 24 25 26 27
o0 31
are high; your last
, cleaned and re-
this season's shape,
band, will look: like
ve you five or ten
do only high class
ry Hat Store, 617
Phone 1792.

a nei
and
,r j

'uttle 's
Lunches
Nunnally's
Candy

STUART A LKER
B ooT nTKO ITPN'S
NEWYORK
COIIPA*
PLAYcYOUTand
LOVEand5UMMERTIME

Maynard St.

J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER
AND OPTOMETRIST
113 SOUTH MAIN STtEET

PRICES: 75 to $2.00
PHONE 480

I''

MAJET
Last Times Today

DOROTHY GISH
-IN -

CO-OPERATION, NOT FORCE, SAID
TO BE POLICY OF REPUBLICAN
CANDIDATE.
Editor, The Michigan Daily:
As a supporter of the candidacy of
Leonard Wood for the Republican
presidential nomination my attention
has been called to an attack upon his
candidacy to appear in The Michigan
Daily. The communication referred
to states that those people of Ann
Arbor who are advocating General
Wood's nomination generally. base
their support upon three grounds.
That the treatment which he re-
ceived from the Wilson administration
aroused indignation, and created sym-
pathy for him is true. But to assert-
that those who are seeking to secure
his nomination advance such treat-
ment as a reason for making him
president of the United States seems
to me to be a reflection upon their
common sense and political itellig-
ence which the facts do not warrant.
Friend of Roosevelt
As to the second point made, there
is no doubt that his close political
and personal friendship with Theo-
dore Roosevelt has been advanced as]
a fact to be weighed in considering
Leonard Wood as a candidate. What
strength it has lies in the fact that
Leonard Wood was one of Roosevelt's
closest friends because he, like Roose-
velt, possesses those qualities and
characteristics which will ever ap-
p'eal to the American people: cour-'
age, absolute squareness in his deal-
ings with all men, the ability to work
harmoniously with other men of his
own caliber, and a deep devotion to
liberty and the institutions of the'
American government. The policies
which Leonard Wood is advocating
are to be considered on their own
merits.
Those who believe that Leonard
Wood's record as an administrator af-
fords' no, good reason for electing him
president Wll find a much more pow-
erful argument to support their views
in. the Lippman article in the New
Republic for March 17 than in the
communication in this morning's
Daily. To those who have any knowl-
edge of the facts, statements that the
United States left Cuba "so unsettled
that military intervention was neces-
sary to restre peace and order," and
implications that the Cubans are a
,"semi-civilized" people require no
comment.
Attack Serious
Mr. Lippman's attack upon Leon-
ard Wood is more serious. It is stat-
ed that Leonard Wood left Cuba with
a "constiution" but without a political
code and without an institutional life,
that for this reason the second in-
tervention was necessary, and that
consequently Leonard Wood's work
was ephemeral and not of high states-
manship.
Leonard Wood had not, during two
years, been able to entirely eradicate
the Spanish political heritage fof the
Cubans, and it was this heritage
which, as the article truly says, led to
the revolution which caused Ameri-
can intervention. Foreseeing what
later occurred, Leonard Wood did see
to it that the constitution which was
drafted while he was governor requir-
ed that "certain laws" designed to
counteract the worst effects of this
political herita' be passed.

Advocates Self-Government
Being a real and not a lip, believer
in self-government, he left those re-
sitrictions upon the Cuban govern-
ment to be passed by the Cubans
themselves in accordance with their
own constitution. -
That they failed to carry out their
agreement is no reflection upon
Wood's statesmanship in giving them
the chance, and is as good evidence
as could be offered as to the quality
of his belief in giving self-government
the best chance to make good before
using force.
This force was applied by the sec-
ond intervention; the Cubans felt
that they had been given a square
deal, and upon the foundations laid
by Leonard Wood, working in co-op-
eration with the Cubans themselves,
a stable government and a satisfied
people have developed in the friend-
liest relations with the United States.
Although possessed of that force he
has rarely had to use it for the real
son that he has been able to secure
his ends by gaining the. cordial co-
opartion of those with whom he has !
worked.
Leonard Wood, is the one candidate
whose success would be most regret-
ed by a certain type of mind. Wood
is feared by these people because he
stands for the maintainance of the
fundamental institutions of American
government in substantially their
traditional form, and because they*
know that he can be neither misled,
nor -cajoled, nor coerced into allow-
ing these institutions to be subverted,
or into discrediting them by violating
them himself.
J. R. HAYDEN.

THE MAJESTIC

A hasty exchange of clothing be-
tween Doris Pennington, an heiress,
and the nurse who is escorting her to
an asylum results in a number of
situations full of comedy possibilities
in "Turning the Tables," featuring'
Dorothy Gish again today at the Ma-
jestic.
THE ARCADE
Telephone girl, model, business wo-
man, writer, and screen artist are the
successive stages in the career of
Alice Joyce who appears as the Duch-
ess of Desborough in the screen ver-
sion of "The Sporting Duchess," the
girlpping melodrama which, will be
repeated today at the Arcade.
The Michigan Daily, the only morn-
ing paper in Ann Arbor, contains all
the latest Ca.Wpus, City and World
News.-Adv.

THE WHITNEY
Stuart Walker has skillfully retain-
ed the atmosphere of Booth Tarking-
ton's book in his dramatization of
"Seventeen" which will appear to-
night at the Whitney with Thomas.
Kelly in the stellar role.
The love affair of William Sylvan-,
nus Baxter, who resents being call-
ed "Willie" by his tormenting young-
er sister Jane, and "Bill" by his
friends, and who also proclaims that
he don't care a snap for girls, is
aptly suited to stage presentation.
The Screen

GRAD SUPPORTS SMITH, '95,
AS NATIONAL COMITTEE
Mr. James 0. Murfin, '96L, of
troit, in a communication to
Michigan Daily in behalf of Ha
Smith, '95, who is a candidate on
Republican primary ballot for th
fice of Republican national com
teeman, stated: "I have not kep
enough touch with political affai:
know what opposition he has, 'i
am always anxious to help a Mi
gan mnan achieve any proper a
tion. Therefore, ,I am dropping
this line to ask you to remember
on primary day, April 5."
JUNIOR COLLEGE CONFERENC
WILL CONSIDER CURRICU
Conference with state represe
tives of junior colleges will be
by the committee of seven of the
erary college at 4 o'clock toda
the Union. A dinner .is to follow
conference which will be informa
nature.
The committee of seven hasI
appointed for the purpose of disc
ing proposed changes in the curr
um of the literary :college.
BASEBALL DEVOTEES AGAIN
COME INTO HANDS OF I
Five more students were force
take a "taxi" ride with the Ann A
police yesterday for' playing base
on Haven street between Hill
Monroe streets.
They were fined $3 and cha
$1.05 for the taxi. Sixteen stud
were arrested in this neighbor
recently for the same offence.
Campus news, student doings,
of the outside world, are all to
found in the Michigaa Daily.-Ad

"Turng the Tables"-
One Big, Long, Side-Achy Laugh-Don't MAs It.

.0

EXTRA FEATURE

.,
;
_
t
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f
/4
t F
ttt r /. /,
i ' i
.k
\ II , P ; r r J r
. ,

"IaER PRIVATE HUSBAND"

/
't

A SUNSHINE COMEDY

A

PATHE NEWS

MAJESTIC ORCHESTRA

I

;.

ADULTS
CHILDREN

l'-c

SHOWS DAILY:
2:00, 8:30, 7:00, 8:30

r+

' R i

! __.......a

Friday-Saturday-CHARLES RAY

IN "CROOKED STRAIGHT"

4

1
r ._

N,.'

a

41

1

i

' ! ,

Today--Your Last

Chance to See

.

ALICE

JOYCE

I

In the Big Drury Lane Production

"THE SPORTING

DUCHESS

I,

I .

^ I

WUERTH THEATRE

I,

34!

I.

I

SHE IS A TRUE

-SPORT

Wed-Thurs., 31, 1-Dolores
Cassinelli in "Virtuous Model"
with a two reel comedy, Joe
Matin in "Baby Doll Bandit."
Fri-Sat., 2, 3-Dustin Farnum
in "Durand of the Bad Land."

I

She has the bearing of
a queen. She is dignified
in adversity, abides by the
decree of Fate like a real
gambler and stakes all on
her favorite horse. She
plays fair to win or lose
r by the results of the Der-
Sby. Her -opponents use
every crooked means a-
vailable to crush her spirit.
It is a thrilling story
with an exciting climax in
the big race scene.

=====w...m

I

I

ORPHEUM THEATRE
2:00, 3:30, 7.00, 8:30,.10:00
Thurs-Fri. 1, 2-Earl Williams
iA "When a Man Loves."

prf<

. . and at the Hippodrome

i.._

/1

Star Comedy-"The Latest in Pants"
and Bray Pictograph
Friday-Sat. - "THE BLUE PEARL.'
A MYSTERY STORY THAT WILL KEEP You GUESSING

HUBER
II SOE TROI

Joh ADrew
In
'THE CAT DIRW,

Detroit
William Courtney in
"CIVILIAN CLOTHES"
11111IIIN HHt11 I N i iilllW#R 1

"7s Enough Turkish"
meauaieace may truly
be cal "repesentative" of the whole
Unit-dS-aes--so-this-dayaer-daypref.
erenacforFatima is highly significant'
For one thing, it shows the broad
sweep of Fativsa'spopularity.
But - more imttorthat - it indicates
that men generally are growing more
sensitive to the taste-effect oi too much
or too little Turkish tobacco ins their
cigarettes.
Fatima's 7uutenouglsTurkish" blend,
in other words, is the one feature which
Sets it definitely apart from all other
cigarettes-and which accounts for it@
leadeship at so many famous places.

.4 At the New York Hippodrome, draw-
ing over three million theatre-goers
annually from every corner of the country,
Fatima is not merely the largest-selling ciga-
rette-it ictually outsells any other by more
than two to one.
FAT-A
SSensible Care

1

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