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April 01, 1920 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-01

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ANNOUNCED

(Continued from Page One)
lowing is the program:
ne 28-Ship Building in War
s (illustrated), Prof. H. C. Sdler.
ne 29-Some Problems of a City
01 Administrator, Mr. Frank
,"superintendent of schools, D-
.-Medical lecture.
ne 30-The Trinity of Transpor-
y. (illustrated); "Prof. A. H.
chard.-Concert by School of
c faculty.
ly 1-A Modern Educational Ten-
x, M4r. . W. Sexton, superintend-
S'schools, Lansing.- What the
ols Must Do, Pres. M. L. Burton.
Reception by President
y 2-Reception by President Bur-
Tunisia (illustrated), Prof. H.
oses
Ly 5-The Treaty of Peace, Prof.
Reeves.
y 6--What America Has Done for
ew, Dr. Henry Berkowitz.-Med-
ecture.
"y 7-What the Jew Has Done for
ca,. Dr.Henry Berkowit.-Con-
by School of Music faculty.
y 8-Americanism and Judism,
Ienry Berkowitz. - Educational
an pictures.
y 9-The Intermediate School,
.O. Marsh, superintnlent of
As,,ackson. -PReading, Goldoni's
ous Mishap," Prof, R. D. T. Hol-
-.
Aimerleanzation Problems
.y 12-Some of the Problems of
ticanization as Seen by an. Army
iologst, Prof. C. S. Berry.
ly 13-The Effect of the War up-
Aterature, Prof. T. E. Rankin.-
,al lecture. ?
ly 14--TheTe Outlook for Interna-
I Law, Prof. E. D. Dickinson.-
ert by School of Music faculty.
ly 15-Niagara Falls and Vicinity
trated), Prof. I. D. Scott.-Ed-
onal motion pictures.
y 16-Excursion to Niagara Falls,
r direction of Prof. I. D. Scott
ne Present Day Educational
lems, Mr. F. E. Spaulding, super-
dent of schools, Cleveland.
.y 19-Subject and lecture to be
tinced.
y 20i-The Wayne County Exper-
t, Mr. W. B. Arbaugh, Detroit.-
cal lecture.
y 21--Subject and lecture to be
unced.-Concert by School of Mu-
Lulty.--Visitors' night at the Ob-
tory.
Lecture in FrenchI
y 22--Les Universites Francois-
rof. R. Talanion. - Educational
n picturesvisitors' night at
bservatory.
y 23-School Building Cam-
s, Mr. E. C. Hartwell, superin-
t ,of schools, Buff alo.--Roman
h Mosaics of the First Nine Ce-
,Librarian W. W. Bishop.-Vis-
night at the Observatory.
y 26--Labor Conditions in Eng-
Miss Geraldine Jebb, of the Uni-
y of Durham, England.-Recitali
ass in Shakespeareanreading.E
V 27-Newspaper English, Prof.
Brumm-Medical lecture.
r 28--Subject and lecturer to be'
inced.-Concert by School of Mu-

July 29-The Problem of the Na-
tional Budget, Prof. J. R. Hayden:--
Educational motion pictures.
July 30-Teachers' Salaries and the
Cost of Living, Prof. L. C. Karpinski.
-eading, Shaw's "The Devil's Dis-
ciple," Mr. R. K. Immel.
Pat-in-Bay Excursion
July 31-Excursion to Put-in-Bay,
under direction of Prof. I. D. Scott.
Aug. 2-Education in England Aft-
er the War, Miss M. Atkinson Wil-
liams, Leeds, England.-Play by class
in play production under the direc-
tion of Prof. R. D. T. Hollister.
Aug. 3-Cuba, Despues de la guerra
entre Espanay los Estados Unidos,
Mr. Julio del Toro.--Play by class in
play production under the direction of
Prof. R. D. T. Hllister.
Aug. 4-Some Phases of Wireless
Cornmnnication, Prof. N., H. Wil-
liams.--Concert by School of Musiz
faculty.
Aug. 5-'Nationalism, Prof. R. M.
Wenley.-Educational. motion pic-
tures.
Aug. 6-Subject and lecturer to be
announced.-Cosmopolitan night.r
Aug. 9 -- The Part-Time School,
Prof. G. E. Myers.
British Indian Policies
Aug. 10-Recent British Policies in
India, Prof. A. L. Cross.-Miscellane-
ous readings by class in interpreta-
tive reading.
Aug. 11-Subject and lecturer to be
announced.-Concert by School'of Mu-
sic -faculty.
Aug. 12-Educational motion pic-
tures.
Aug.13-Spanish' Gypsy Folk Sonigs
(illustrated With the victrola), Pro,.
C. P. Wagner.
Aug . 17-Recital by class in Shake-
spearean reading.

and do you have trouble getting shoes that feel
ee u rt?
good until worn out? Do new shoes feel better
at first than your old ones? Or do you buy shoes ARCH PRESERVER
'that feel good the first day or two and the. longer
you wear them the more they torture you?
HAVE YOU INGROWING TOE NAILS, CORNS, BUNIONS,
CALLO ES ON BOTTOM OF FEETP DO YOUR FEET BURN
AND SWELL. OR SHARP PAINS SHOOT THROUGH THEM?
DO THEY BECOME EXTREMELY COLD IN WINTER? DO
YOUR ANKLES TURN OVER EASILY AND LEGS ACHE?

The above are SOME of the SYMPTOMS OF F 0o T
TROUBLE that have been caused solely by MISFITTED
SHOES -- almost invariably TOO SHORT. So it is logi-

cal-and as a matter of fact, is true
MAN WHO CAN GIVE YOU ANY GREAT AMOUNT
OF RELIEF from such trouble is the MAN WHO UNDER-
STANDS, FIRST AND MOST IMPORTANT, HOW TO
CORRECTLY FIT SHOES TO THE VARIOUS TYPES
OF FEET AND WHO HAS THE STOCK OF SHOES
THAT MAKE POSSIBLE SUCH FITTINGS.
THIS SKILL IN FITTING FEET can not be acquired
by taking a lecture course nor can it be acquired in a few
months or a few years but TAKES AT LEAST 10 or 12
YEARS OF CONTINUED PAINSTAKING EFFORT -
very few becoming skilled even in that length of time.
This is why the modern physician realizes that he is pow-
erless to relieve foot troubles TO ANY GREAT EXTENT,

- that THE ONLY
in
a.

i

Library Shows,
ookBindings
Methods and styles of book binding
dating from 1470 up to the present
time are being shown in the exhibit
that was opened Monday in the main
corridor of the Library.
This exhibit includes books from the
15th century, bound in pig and calf
skin, to those bound in cloth and
leather that came out of the bindery
only last week.
One of the features of the exhibit
is a number of volumes of the Anglo
Saxon review published by Lady
Churchill. Each volume imitates some
famous binding, such as those\ of
Henry VIII, Charles I, James I, and
Diana of Poictiers. Many of the cov-
ers have coat-of-arms on them.
Examples of some of the works of.
famous binders show the best bind-
ing that can be done, in both plain
and fancy covers. Among the binders
are Zaehnsdorf of London, Strikeman
of New York, and Belz-Niedree of
Paris.,Sangorskiand Sutcliffe, of
London, bound one of the books which
was donated to the Library by the
Honorable A. M. Todd of Kalamazoo.
One of the cases in the main corric
dor is devoted to books with designs
in gauffred and gilded over marbling
edges.
Modern binding is exhibited in work
done by the University of Michigan
bindery. Novels bound by Scribners
give illustrations of publishers' cov-
ers.

{

except in cases where surgery is necessary, and relies on -Ae Preserer Shoes Do not
BreakDownin the Shank.
the EXPERT FOOT FITTER.
Second, it is ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY TO BE ABLE
TO CORRECTLY FIT AND ADJUST THE PROPER ARCH
SUPPORT FOR EACH PARTIcULAR CASE. ..man who
cannot fit shoes properly can never learn to fit arch supports
yo they will do any great amount of good and it TAKES A
GREAT MANY MORE YEARS TO BECOME SKILLED IN
THE FITTING OF ARCH SUPPORTS than it does even to
'A Broad Toe, Low Heel Style, t shoes e.
Ladies' Arch Preserver, learnt fit BhoEYcorrecty. N H
rFOR THESE REASONS IT BEHOOV ES ANYONE HAVING' FOOIT TROU-

'C

UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN,
ARBOR, MICHIGAN HARRY B. HUTCHINS, LL.D., President

BLE OR WHO WISHES TO AVOID IT, TO SELECT YOUR SHOE STORE
WITH MUCH MORE CARE EVEN THAN YOU USE IN CHOOSING YOUR
PHYSICIAN.
I have made a CAREFUL STUDY FOR 20 YEARS OF THE RELIEF OF
FOOT. TROUBLES and now carry a I arge stock of the SPECIAL TYPES OF
SHOES AND ARCH SUPPORTS necessary to relieve'any case of FOOT TROU-
BLE.
DO NOT THINK BECAUSE YOU MAY HAVE S P E N T HUNDREDS OF
DOLLARS ON YOUR FEET WITHOUT RELIEF THAT NO ONE UNDER-
STANDS HOW TO RELIEVE THE TROUBLE. I WILL GUARANTEE TO
GIVE YOU RELIEF IF MY DIRECTIONS ARE CAREFULLY FOLLOWED.
The patented "ARCH PRESERVER"
fl SHOES alone, for which we are agents,
FITTED AS WE FIT THEM, will RE-
00 LIEVE a large percentage of foot troubles
and PREVENT practically all of them.
One of the extremely desirable features
of these ARCH PRESERVER SHOES is A handsome model in Men's Arch
. :_~ . reserver carried in Brown and Black+
the fact that while THEY ARE RADI--sir ad hi rndl
CALLY DIFFERENT IN EVERY WAY from other shoes they
One of the Cuban Heel Stylef * -, the of stylish.
in Ladies' Arch Preservers. hAaveth appearance o high-gradestlh shoes.

A

Cosmopolitan Student Community
Eight Schools and Colleges

COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS--JOHN R. EFFINGER, Dean.
literary and scientific courses-Teachers' course-Higher commercial course-Course
nsurance-Couirse in forestry-Course in landscape design--All courses' open to pro-
ional students on approval of Faculty.
COLLEGES OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE, MORTIMER E.. COOLEY, Dean.
iplete courses in civil, mechanical, electrical, naval, and chemical engineering-Archi-
re and architectural engineering-Highway engineering-Technical work under in-
tors of professional experience--Work-shop, experimental, and field' practice-Me-
ical, physical, electrical, and chemical laboratories-Fine new building-Central heat-
and lighting plants adapted for instruction.
MEDICAL SCHlOOL, V. C. VAUGHAN, Deat. Four years' graded course--Highest
lard for all work-Special attention given to laboratory teaching-Modern laboratories
rple clinical facilities-Bedside instruction in hospital, entirely under University con-
a special feature.
LAW SCHOOL, HENRY M. BATEs, Dean. Three years' course-Practice court work
ecialty--Special facilities for work in history and' political sciences.
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY, HENRY KRAMER, Dean. Two, three, and four years'
es-Ample laboratory facilities-Training for prescription service, manufacturing
macy, industrial chemistry, and for the work of the analyst.
HOMOEOPATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL, W. B. HINSDALE, Dean. Full four years'
e-Fully equipped hospital, entirely under Universityhcontrol-Especialnattention given
iateria medica and scientific prescribing---Twventy hours' weekly clinical instruction.
COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY, MARCUS L. WARD, Dean. Four years' course-
in building housing ample laboratories, clinical rooms, library, and lecture room-
al material in excess of needs.
GRADUATE SCHOOL, ALFRED H. LLOYD, Dean. Graduate courses in all dtpartments
cial courses leading to the higher professional degrees.
UMMER SESSION, E. H. KRAus, Dean. A regular session of the University afford-
:redit toward degrees. More than 275 courses in arts, engineering, medicine, law,;
nacy, and library methods.
or full information (Catalogues, Announcements of the various Schools and Col-
,sCampus Guide Book, etc., or matters of individual inquiry) address Deans of
)Is and Colleges, or the Secretary of the University.

123 East
Liberty Street

SHIRLEY W. SMITH, Secretary

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