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April 01, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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POZAJ A!
PRESS
DAY AND NiGH7
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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TIJURSDAY, APRIL 1, 1920.

PRICE

(AW BALLOT SCHEDULED TOD

-.-.- ,-

ITI ON TO
WAR STATE
INTROD'UCED
N MEMBERS PUT MEAS-
r BEFORE CON-
GRESS
LEADERS BACK
['TEEMEN'S MOVE
Jam Act Through, But
ats Postpone Action
Until Holiday

>ciated Press)
arch 31.-Peace

with

through adoption of a joint
n declaring the war at an
put squarely before congress
Republicans in control of the

Framed by Republican members of
the Foreign Allied committee and
backed by party leaders, the measure
was thrown into the hopper with as
little ceremony as if it had been a
bridge bill, but instantly there de-
veloped a demand for speedy action.
A move to jam it through the house
Friday took shape, but the Democrats,
outspoken in their opposition, finally
obtained an agreement to postpone
consideration until Monday.
Call on Good Friday
While trying to Work out a resolu-
tion calculated to uit all factions of
their party, Republican committeemen
had arranged to cal it up Friday, re-
membering that it was on Good Fri-
day three years ago that war was de-
clared.
The resolution, introduced by Chair-
man Porter of the Foreign Affairs
committee, provides for a termina-
tion of a state of ,wsr as soon as it
becomes effective. It provides also
for reciprocal trading with Germany
under certain restrictions and for
repeal of the presidenit's war powers.
Germany Allowed Time
Germany would be allowed 45 days
to notify the president that it has
declared a termination of war and has
waived all claims agaihst the United
States that it would rrit have had the
right to assert had thb United States
ratified the treaty of Versailles.s
Upon Germany's failure to,. send
such notification tadfg or making
of loans or credits would be prohib-
ited except with the license of the
president.
SENIOR LITS HEAR
FACULTY SPEAKERS.
Prof. R. M. Wenley o' the philoso-
phy department and Prof. David Fri-
day of the economics department were
the speakers at the "get-together"
smoker of the senior ]its held last
night at the Union.
Advisipg all men to follow a hobby
as well as their reglar vcations, Pro-
fessor Wenley advocated politics as
a good pursuit for leisure hours. Pro-
fessor Friday, in his talk, asserted the
need for further leisure for faculty
members in order that the universi-
ties might offer a real inducement to
good men to stay with them. ,
Mathew Towar acted as master of
ceremonies, and Sandy Wilson's or-
chestra furnished music for .the occa-
sion.
Schoolmasters' Club to Hear Colby,
"The Einstein Theory of Gravita-
tion" will be the title of a paper by
Pref. Walter F. Colby, of the physics
department, to be read at 2 o'clock
this afternoon in the west lecture room

DEMOCRATS TO
EFFECT. FORMAL
ORGANIZATION
Mr. A. R. Canfield, secretary of the
Democrati'c state committee, will be
at the first official meeting of the Uni-
versity Democrat club to be held at
7:30 o'clock tonight in the basement
of Lane hall. Both .men and women
of the University are invited.
Mr. Frank Murphy, U. S. district at-
torney of Detroit, is to speak on "The
Issues -That the Democratic Candi-
dates Are to Take to the Polls."
Prof. W. D. Henderson, director of the
University Extension division, will
talk on "Democratic Principles."
George Burke, '07L, of this city, is al-
so on the program.
The Democrat club is 'a non-candi-
date club with the aim of aiding in
every way all of those who are run-
ning on the Democratic ticket in the
coming election.
TEACHEIRS CNVN
State Schoolmasters' Club to Open
Fifty-Fifth Annual Conven-.
tion Today
WORK WILL BE CONDUCTED
- BY SECTIONAL CONFERENCES
Teachers from all high schools, nor-
mal schools, and colleges from the
state of Michigan will assemble in Ann
Arbor today and tomorrow for the
55th meeting of the Michigan School-
masters' club.
This afternoon 15 conferences, made
up of teachers of literature, science,
and the arts, will assemble to discuss
problems connected - with the vari-
ous branches of learning. The head-
quarters and registration room of the
club will be in the Registrar's office
in University hall:
Library Plans Exhibit
Exhibits under the direction of the
University library extension service
will be shown in the Library until
Friday. An exhibit of the art work
of the public schools of Michigan will
also take place in the Alumni Memo-
rial hall today and Friday.
Eminent Educators Here
Eminent educators from all parts
of the country will address the vari-
ous 'sessions of the school teachers.
(Continued on Page Eight)

GlLEE CLUB WILL
OFFERPRE- TRIP
CONCERTTONIGHT,
PERSONNEL OF TRIP AND ALTER-
NATES TO APPEAR
HERE
PROCEEDS TO BE USED
IN SPRING COAST TOUR
Program Typical of That Proposed for
Outside Cities
Planned
With the personnel of the 'trip men
and the added number of alternates
the Varsity Glee and Mandolin club
will appear in their Pre-trip con-
at 8 o'clock tonight in Hill auditor-
ium. A program similar to that
which will be presented in trip con-
certs has been arranged.'
Vacation Extended
The concert receipts will serve to-
wards paying the expenses of the
combined clubs on their trip to the
coast during spring vacation. Exten-
sion of vacation has been received for
trip members from the University fac-
ulty, and railroad arrangements have
been completed. The organization
will leave at 8:50 o'clock, Friday
morning,' April 9.
Dieterle Soloist
The program for tonight's concert
is: The Victors and Varsity-combined
bined clubs; Boston Ideal march-
Mandolin club; The Lamp in the
West, and The Song of Prince Rup-
pert's Men--Glee club; Selections-
Varsity quartette; Medley-Varsity
Stringed sextette; baritone solo-Rob-
ert R. Dieterle, '21M; Au Bord d'un
Ruisseau-Mandolin club; Harmony-
Midnight Sons' quartette;, War song.
frome "The Cross of Fire"-Dieterle
and Glee club; Jazz-Al-Campus jazz
orchestra; The Blue Danube Waltzes
-Mandolin club; De Sandman, and
Swing Along-Glee club; The Yellow
and Blue-combined clubs.
Dr. W. D. Henderson Resumes Work
Dr. W. D. Henderson, director of the
University Extension division, has re-
turned to his work since recovery
from the effects of a recent accident.
He will assume his regular hours in
the Uniyersity today.

Facts .About Today 's Balloting
Polls open from 9 to 3 o'clock, in the following places:
Engineering arch, Law building, Medical buildifg, University
hall, Library.
In case of rain, booths will be moved inside.
University hall booth in charge of women.
General ballot supervisor will be located at the Library booth.
Purpose of ballot: To determine the choice of campus Repub-
licans and Democrats as to the nominee they wish to represent their
party.
Manner of voting: Ask for your party ballot, then place an X
in the square next the name you favor. Be sure to sign the slip at
the foot of the ballot. Indicate whether you are student or faculty
member.
Candidates on Republican ballot: Hoover, Johnson, Lowden,
Pershing, Poindexter, Simpson,Wood. (If you wish to vote for
Simpson, place his name at the foot of the ballot.) -
Candidates on Democratic ballot: Hoover, Palmer, Edwards,
McAdoo, Bryan.
Who can vote: All students, regardless of age; and all mem-
bers of the faculty.p

MAYOR REQUESTS.
COMMEMORATION
OF GOOD FRIDAY
Many State and down town mer-
chants will close their business houses
tomofrow from 12 'to 3 o'clock in ac-
cordance with the request of Mayor
Wurster anIl the president of the Re-
ligious federation for the observance
of Good Friday.
The proclamation follows:
"We suggest that the peopre of Ann
Arbor commemorate this year the
three hours during which Jesus Christ
hung upon the cross, by the .suspend-
ing of the transaction of business and
the performance of work between the
hours of 12 and 3 on Friday after-
noon and by spending this time in sin-
cere devotion and worship, either pri-
vately or at some public place of wor-
ship.

"We also suggest that whether serv-
ices are held in the churches or not,
they be heated and open to the pu-b-
lic during these three hours.
"We further recommend that the,
people attend as far as possible the
services which will be held in some
of the churches at various hours on
Good Friday."
ERNEST M. WURSTER,
Mayor of Ann Arbor,
1. M. WELLS,
President of the Religious Federa-
tion of Ann Arbor.

With balloting places establit
five points on the campus, all
readiness for the campus presi
straw vote today. Extreme i
manifested, in active support gi
the principal candidates by s
and faculty points to the pollir
vote such as has seldom been
the University body. As proof
widespread disposition to ta
in the. campaign, it was ann
last night that;on Wednesday
4,000 tags had been issued f
porters of a single candidate.
Final Plans Made
Final plans for the vote wer
at a meeting c~f represetatives
Republican and Democratic clu
The Daily Wednesday afterno
distribution of ballots was deci
on, and arrangements were n
classify the returns by can
parties, departments, sexes, and
er student or faculty. Compi
tistical information will tb
available.
Ballots of Four Kinds
Ballots, which have been
will be of four different color
cilitate counting, as follows:
Democratic, brown; women,'F
can, pink; men, Demiocratic,
men, Republican, 'white. It is
ularly urged that every voter
ber to sign the slip at the bo
the ballot, as~ this when detach~
stitutes the record for the desi
tistical returns. Space at the
the ballot indicates whether ti
is student or faculty member.
All campus political organ
have urged that voters come ou
polls and support their candid
is contended that a good turn
strengthen the influence of th
organizations in securing the
litical speakers during the ca
Replica of State Primni
Facu-ly men,' in stressing ti
of the straw ballot and urgi
dents to express their pre
have pointed out that one of t
useful features of the vote is
that it is a replica of the sta
idential primaries to be ve
Monday. This should serv
think, to center opinon on the
tance of the primaries and gi
tical instruction in the way
ballot is carried on.
"If it is seen to that th
names appear on the straw v
lots as are printed on the st
mary ballots, I think the id
r very good one," said- Prof
Reeves of the political scie
(Continued on Page Eig

INTEREST SHOWN POINTS T(
TREMELY LARGE PAR-
TICIPATION
5 BALLOTING BOOTH1
TO BE OPEN 9 T
Faculty Men Strongly Endorse
as Means of Becoming Famill
with Political Methods

U UNIVERSITY CAMPAIGN FAVONA

POGRAIMFOR SUMMER-
SESSION I NNOUNCED
DOCTOR BURTON TO GIVE FIRST
ADDRESS AS PRESIDENT
JULY 1'
An address by Dr. Marion L. Burton
on July 1 in Hill auditorium and a re-
ception on July 2 in Alumni Memorial
hall are features of the opening of the,
1920 Summer session program which
has been announced by Prof. Edward

COUNCIL FAYORS DUES
IN. REGISTRATION FEES

'WOLD
AN,

MAKE COMMENCEMENT
ALL-CAIMPS FUNC-
TION

Unusual ,unctions To 1Beatur
Celebration Of National Holiday

All classe┬ž in the University will be
dispensed with today and the regular
drudgery of college life will give way
to a special program that was worked
out at a meeting of the Regents of the
University in the Tap room of the
Union last night.
At the meeting much emphasis was
laid on thefact that today is cur most
democratic holiday, for, as Dr. Tom
Lovell put it, "the Fourth of July is
to commemorate the landing of the
Pilgrims. On February 22 we cele-
brate the chopping down of a cherry
tree by Theodore Roosevelt, but to-
day is a day set aside to honor a great'
mass of people who are never honored
at any other time." The Doctor did

white "middie blouses," brown cordu- H. Kraus, dean of the Summer school.

roy skirts and tennis shoes, which will
also be the official costume at the mat-
inee dance given by the Doncha
Krave Tea fraternity in the . after-
non, at which all women of the cam-
pus will be welcomed.
There will be a meeting of all wom-
en in the Michigan Union ,opera at
6:15 o'clock in Lane hall, in order
that they will be able to attend the
big picnic supper at the Island and
the annual snipe-hunt which follows.
The idea of a picnic supper on the
Island for all the students of the Uni-
versity is not a new one, and although
there has not been such an affair for
a number of years it is hoped that'

The subject of Dr. Burton's lecture
will be "What the Schools Must Do."
Throughout the course, Tuesday
evenings are to be given over to lec-
tures on medical matters by r'embers
of the faculty of the Medical school.
Wednesday evenings are reserved fort
concerts by the faculty of the School
of Music, which will be given in Hill
auditorium, and the Thursday pro-
grams include motion pictures on ed-
ucational subjects.
* Miss Geraldine Jebb of the Univer-
sity of Durham, England, is scheduled
for one lecture. It is the hope of Pro-
fessor Kraus that she'may be able to
spend a week in Ann Arbor.
Mr. F. E. Spaulding, superintendent
of schools in Cleveland, who is to be-
come a member of the Yale faculty
next fall, and Dr. Henry Berkowitz of
Philadelphia, rabbi in the Jewish
church, are among the speakers. .
(Continued on Page Four)

With its main purpose the inclus-
ion of all class dues in the regular.
registration fee paid at the beginning
of the year, the Student council has
framed a petition to be presented to
the Board of Regents. The petition
sets the .amount of class dues at $1,
and provides for the foundation of a
scholarship fund from such' funds as
may not be used by the classes.
Ths desirability of making Com-
mencement week a function o im-
portance to the entire University was
brought up for discussion. With the
idea that the inclusion in -this week
of 'some such event as a pageant, or
large water carnival w'ould tend to
keep the student body at college for
Commencement and thus bring them
in closer touch with the alumni, a
committee was appointed to formulate
some such plans for that time'
The committee consists of William
W. Hinshaw, '20, chairman; Lloyd
Herth, '20D, Frank J. Helbig, '20P,
Joseph A. Kervin, '20M:
Further plans- for .the opening of
Hill auditorium to political speakers
were discussed, and the matter was
(Continued on Page Eight)

not deny that it was also his birth- every true Michigan man and woman
day, but modestly stated that the day will be in attendance.
has even a greater significance. Anyone who is planning to partic-
Today all ex-Joe's-and-the-Orient ipate in any of the above functions is
men who wear iubber collars in mem- hereby elected . and crowned, yea,
ory -of Ithe damp old days, while the crowned, for he shall be queen of the
women' of the University will wear April Fools.

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MICHIGANENSIAN NO'
All who paid in full fi
Michiganensian, and
names are spelled incot
in the Directory, should
the manager at once. HN
not be responsible for the
j as it appears on the book

sics building.

_- -

50o

TONIGHT
PRE-TRIP CONCERT
OF THE GLEE AND MANDOLIN CLUB

50c

NEW

PICKED

I

DIRECTION

HELP BOOST THE CLUB TO THE COAST

8 O'clock, Hill Auditorium

T11

U-.m

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