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March 30, 1920 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1 HE irl(1 VIU. DIa-ULY

Asked At Random)

re high; your last sea-
ed and reblocked into
ape, with a new band,I
iew and save you five
We do only high class
Hat Store, 617 Pack-
1792.-Adv
rniture and Rugs at
e.-Adv.

(Any member cif the University,
professor or student, who has a ques-
tion he wishes discussed in this col-
umn may mail it to the "Asked at
Random" reporter, care of The
Daily.)
"What do you think of the suggest-
ed plan for some University organiza.
tion to charter, Hill auditorium and
exhibit the best feature moving pie.
ture films there at a trifle above cost"

NIVERSITY OF

Frank Petty, '21, Student council-
man: "I rather. doubt whether this
plan would be successful. It seems
to me that it would be hard to fill the
auditorium on account of its size.
I am decidedly in favor, however, of
something being done to do away with
the present exhorbitant prices that the
local moving picture houses are charg-
ing."
Phyllis G. Wiley, '21, vice-president
of the Women's Athletic association:
"It appears to me that his plan is very
practical and could be carried through
with success. There are certainly
enough points in favor to warrant its
being tried out.".
William R. Harrison, '21E, business
manager of the Technic: "This is a
Very good plan and should succeed if
the right men get behind it. The
movies in Ann Arbor are charging en-
tirely too much for their shows and
it is unreasonable to expect the stu-
dents to submit to them."
Jack Gardener, '21, publication man-
ager of the Chimes: "Under the pres-
ent circumstances this plan seems ex-
ceptionally feasible to me. The only
thing to hinder its success would be
the liability of 'mpb scenes' in the
auditorium. If in some way the safety
of the building could be.insured, I am
very much in favor of having this idea
carried through."

Music Notes

MICHIGAN

With such a distinguished person-
nel as George Barrere, the founder of
the famous Barrere ensemble of wind
instruments, Carlos Salzedo, the first
harp virtuoso to appear in the United
States, and Paul Kefer, for five years
solo 'cellist with the New York Sym-
phony orchestra, the Trio de Lutece
which appears at 8 o'clock this eve-
ning in Hill auditorium promises to
close the extra concert series with a
unique and enjoyable concert.
The program will be as follows:
Sonata a Trios ... . Jean Marie Leclair
Adagia, Allegro
Largo (Saraband)
Allegro assai
Trio de Lutece
Elegie ................Gabriel Faure
'Cello Solo-Lucien Schmitt
Danse Espagnole ..Enrique Granados
Le Rouet (L'Oissau bleu)..George Hue
Le petit berger ......Claude Debussy
Trio de Lutece
Three Preludes .......Carlos Salzedo
Quietude; Introspection; Whir ind
Harp solo-Carlos Salzedo ....
Fantaisie................George Hue
Flute Solo--George Barrere
Sonatina en Trio .....Maurice Ravel
Modere
Mouvement de Menuet
" Trio de Lutece
Graham's Annual Book Sale. Bic
reductions in prices.-Adv.

UNIVERSITY HALL FRIDAY, APRIL 2, AT 4 P. M.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
Auspices, University Oratorical Association
AMERICA'S FOREMOST IMPERSONATOR
HORTENSE NEILSEN
In Maeterlinck's Masterpiece
,MONNA VANNA
Amy Leslie of the Chicago News says:-"I have seen all the great
Artists, but Hortense Nielsen has no equal in the portrayal of Maeter-
linck."
TICKETS 50c The Literary Event of the Season

MICH WAN

HARRY B. HUTCHINS, LL.D., President

Cosmopolitan Student Community
Eight Schools and Colleges

OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE, AND THE ARTS--JOHN R. EFFINGER, Dear.
nd scientific courses-Teachers' course-Higher commercial course-Course
Course in forestry-Course in landscape design-All courses open to pro-
mits on approval of Faculty.
S OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE, MORTIMER E. COOLEY, Dean.
ses in civil, mechanical, electrical, naval, and chemical engineering-Archi-
rchitectural engineering-Highway engineering-Technical work under in-
'rofessional experience-Work-shop, experimental, and field practice--Me-
cal, electrical, and chemical laboratories-Fine new building-Central heat-
g plants adapted for instruction.
SCHOOL, V. C. VAUGHAN, Dean. Four years' graded course-Highest
11 work-Special attention given to laboratory teaching-Modern laboratories
al facilities-Bedside instruction in hospital, entirely under University con-
feature.-
[QOL, HENRY M. BATES, Dean. Three years' course-Practice court work
>ecial facilities for work in history and political sciences.
OF 'PHARMACY, HENRY KRAMER, Dean. Two, three, and four years'
e laboratory facilities--Training for prescription service, manufacturing
ustrial chemistry, and for the work of the analyst.
PATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL, W. B. HINSDALE, Dean. Full four years'
equipped hospital, entirely under University control-Especial attention given
dica and scientific prescribing--Twenty hours'Dweekly clinical instruction.
SOF DENTAL SURGERY, MARCUS L. WARD, Dean. Four years' course-
ng housing ample laboratories, clinical rooms, library, and lecture room-
al in excess of needs.
rE SCHOOL, ALFRED H. LLOYD, Dean. Graduate courses in all departments.
ses leading to the higher professional degrees.
SESSION, E. H. KRAus, Dean. A regular session of the University. afford-
bard degrees. More than 275 courses in arts, engineering, medicine, law,
llibrary methods.
nformation (Catalogues, Announcements of the various Schools and Col-
; Gide Book, etc., or matters of individual inquiry) address Deans of
olleges, or the Secretary of the University.-

WHA'S GOING ON

I
I

SHIRLEY W. SMITH, Secretary

i

w
M
,'

JUST RECEIVED
a new lot of those

J

Patent

Leather

Ties

6:00-Interfraternity conference din-
ner, room 318-20, Union.
7 :00-Triangles meet in room 304, Un-
ion.
7:00- Freshman band rehearsal in
room 201, Mason hall.
7 :00-Union orchestra rehearsal at
the Union. Full orchestra.
7 060-.Jlop committee meets in room
319, Union.
:30-Illinois club meets in room 318,
Union.
7:30- Adelphi House of Representa-
tives meet to attend oratorical con-
test.
7:30-Round-Up club ,meets at the
Union.
8:00-Prof. Charles Cooley speaks to
Intercollegiate Socialist society in
room P .162, Natural Science build-
ing.
f " E1tla, series ,onoert. in Hill
arditorium.
8:00 --- Northern Oratorical league
contest in University Hall.
WEDNESDAY
4:1--Student recital at the School
of Music.
6:00-Howe club dinner, room 321,
Union.
7 :00 I Circolo d' Annunzio meets in
room 202, Mason hall.
7:30--Senior lit smoker, second floor
reading room, Union.
U-NOTICES
A Jewish students wishing to sign
up for Passover meals should call,
Harry August; 1589-W.
Ifembership lists for the Make-HooT-
er-President club may be signed at
the Foster Art shop. Badges may
be secured upon application.
Sophomore engineers will meet at e5
o'clock this morning in room 348 of
the Engineering building. Prof.
John F. Shepard of the psyohology
e department will speak.
HERE'S INPRMATION ON
~IT HOSE SPIANTS

am

For

And Spurs have won
Uneir place on merit.
,, r r
I a

i
f
:![{ F.
1
c
.

I

DRESS and DANCING

For Men

--~-", i
gm
t7'
Not
newa
Aanew~iaet
* There was room at the top for a new and better
cigarette. And Spurs fit in right there I
Spur's decidedly new blend makes the Orient's
choicest tobaccos and America's finest yield more
richness, aroma and mildness than you thought a
cigarette could have. A new method of rolling,
crimped, not pasted, makes Spur's good old to-
bacco taste last longer.
If you're, fed-up with ordinary cigarettes, Spurs
will. give you a fresh start.

e never seen a more satisfactory dancing shoe and that
inion of everyone who has purchased these from us
year and a half.

are WELTED

CONSTRUCTION - which

P ITS SHAPE and DOES NOT TIRE YOU. The
:IAL SOLE and INSOLE used in this Shoe is the
ST FLEXIBLE LEATHER PRODUCED.
e upper the BEST of enameled RUSSIAN COLT-

VOULD BE A MISTAKE FOR YOU TO BUY
EAPER SHOE AND A WASTE OF MONEY
iY MORE-while this lot lass-$14.0.

(Continued from Page One)
For his work in the Philippines
Pershing was promoted to the grade
of brigadier general by President
Roosevelt in 1906.
The most prominent personal char-
acteristics of General Pershing are
his strict sense of duty and his tre-
mendous capacity for hard work. In
Mexico with the expedition in pursuint
of Villa in 1916 he probably spent 1rh
time in sleep than any man in
command.
,When John J. Pershing was *e ,tVd
as commander in chief of oqw forces
in France no wiser choice, (mUd lave
been made. His strength af cb'aract-
er, devotion to the ideals of his coun-
try and wide experience in handling
men eminently fitted him for the big-
gest job any American has ever been
called upon to handle.

,u .,,?. .4 .

Spur is "class" all through-
ovett to the refitted "brown-
gd-silver" package, triple.
rapping, that keeps Spurs
fresh and fragrant.
2Oh- 20

"

co

pteS

Liberty Street--Corner 4th Avenue

c. . e_ .,,

_....._. _,. ''mi l

The
J-Hop

Portraits
Quality

Make Your
A\rPPOINTMENTS
p~To Be
Pt4OTOGRAPHED
In Your

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