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March 28, 1920 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-28

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SUNDAY

I

EATURE

SECTIO.N

r-=

IN 1

LITERARY

( P .99L I- Abb- tr tl FtYt titll

SECTION
TWO

:XX. No. 129.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 28, 1920.

PRICE

1TADIYIONS
CAP NIGHT,
IA AND GAMESi

} AS IT WILL LOOK WHEN COMPLETED
The New University Hospital

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL NOW UNDER
CONSTRUCTION, WILL BE GREATE'
INSTITUTION OfKIND IN AME

U'

SlIMEN TOQUES' GIVE WAY
rO MORE CHARACTERISTIC
"POT"
ING OUT SCHEDULED
DR MAY 20'THIS YEAR

to "" Men
Event, Be-
nent

are G

By Brewster P. Campbell
Flowers are not the only things
which bloom in the spring.
Once the' yearlings' thoughts turn
to4that perenially'.blooming, ever fash-
ionable bit of headgear, the freshman
"pet," there awakens each year an
entire host of traditions, following a
winter of comparative dormancy. But
too often the newcomer at Michigan
dons the little grey cap and .believes
that thus, in some manner, he has
ab orbed the spirit -of Michigan tra-
ditlons to the full, when in reality he
hag but scratched .the surface.
* Tradtions Form Spirit
these Michigan traditions are more
than a mere list of "don'ts" for fresh-
nen; they are more than a mere list
of :dos and don'ts" for all the -men
adi women of the University. -They
are a somnetbing woven into the very
woof of campus -life, and they com-
prbe practically all the student func-
t1s of any .note.
On the eye of April 9 will be held
tp Junior Iop, traditionally the one
bi social event of the year at Mich-
igan, During the :week immediately
p~@seding the Hop, and with one, Hop
performance, will be produced the
tjUnon opera, "George Did It," which
is likwise tr ditionally the most ex-
teasive 1;heatripal venture which the
T versity attempts each year. Both
inese events are of a nature quite
different from the "dos and don'ts"
with which so many students asso-
oiwte Michigan traditions.
fames Replace Fights
On May 14 and I5 will be held the
.Spring ames, contests which 'have
t en, 'thd place of the ild unorgan-
ized mob fights. FQr some ten years
It ;%aw. beep the custom to hold these
games under supervision of the Stu-
dent Council, and so they have taken
their' plae among recognized Michi-
gn trsditions.
t is tradition that at Swing Out the
s g.ors .ppear for the first time in
their caps and gowns. Forming first
oi diferent streets, they march to
Hill Auditorium, where appropriate
exercises are hld, after which they
march in a body to the camps, form-
i a block "M." Swing Out, one of
the moat impressife of 141chigan tra-
ditigns, falls on May 20 this year.
Foilowing Swing Out in the aen-
d"' of student events this spring
co ies Cap Night the'night when the
el ses abaidon their old status and
o s one step forward, from the
fr shmen who become sophomores to
the seniors who go out into the world.
Oi this night is sung "Where, Oh
Where," which is in itself a Michigan
traditlon, as is Cap Night.
Will Ronor "" Men
1$lanket presentation has b.een stt
for May 2. This ceremony cannot
as yet be classed among Michigan tra-
diions, being new thIs year. But as'
tho committee in charge has outlined
the plan' it seems that the event bids
fair to take its place among Michigan
annual student events..'
,ass meetings, too, have taken their
place among Michigan traditions, and
ittwas for this reason that a Tradition
Pay mass meeting was instituted in
tle fall of 918,, and was repeated in
the fall of 1919.

. . .

FLYING, VARSITY
SPORT, PROBA1BLE
Opportunity at Michigan for Develop
* 'inent of Aeronautics Said to
be Best
SPEEDY MEANS OF LOCOMOTION
APPEALS TO AERO HEAD
(By Donald Coleman)
Ten years from now, insted of
rolling up your blanket and pillows
after the final whistle of the Michi-
gan-Ohio State game, the chances are
you'll wait for the finish of the Con-
ference aeroplane race or some such
air derby. You remember what you
thought of that aviator at the Syra-
cuse game in 1916 when he made
those hair-raising dips toward the
south stand? He was a little ahead
of the tides.
Said air derby will be a good chance
to revive some of those choice ex-
pressions acquired during the war in
imagining the new sportsmen are
Fritzies over Belleau wood, Soissons,
and other exclusive drives.
Possible as Sport
However, the above modest prophe-
cy has the qualified approval of Prof.
F. W. Pawlowsli, whose opinions in
this field are well worth considering.
Listen:. "Aero sports a a phase of
aeronautics will, very likely, find a
blace in University athletics and con-
tests." Further: "Aeronautical clubs
composed of former aviators and men
interested in flying, by acquainting
the people with facts, will dt much
to popularize flying, not on'ly as a Uni-
versity sport, but as a trustworthy,
speedy means of locomotion."
Flying 'as a sport should become
very popular at Michigan. With no
prospect of yachting regattas or a
Varsity crew, because of the wet
trickle shown on topographical maps
as the Huron, with automobile racing
looked on as decidedly professional,
our greatest hope for collegiate dis-
tinction naturally lies in the latest
and least developed of sports, avia-
tion,
What was true for the automobile
industry and merchant marine is
strikingly true for aeronautics. The
average person has a more or less
rosy dream of an aeroplane that will
land on his roof, store in the solarium
and take off from the petunia bed in
the back yard. We might just as well
expect the Mauretania to steam up
the Diagonal Walk, put out her gang-
plank at the Economics porch and
take on our professors and families
for their annual trip abroad. This
only illustrates the necessity of creat-
ing propaganda in favor of matters
aeronautic.
. Must be Popularized
Aeronautics must be popularized,
and at first, perhaps, adequately
(Continued on page 2)

FROM THE

TOWER

1 ~By IH. EX. B...

First call for serenaders.

Thanks. We Thought They Were Run-
ning on Last Year's Calendar,
Dear Her: I n'ever knew till last
week why the Ann Arbor Railroad
was a day behind in its schedule.
Now I . know! That engine6r must
have been a chauffeur. Whenever he
sees one of those Stop! Look! and
Listen! signs, he stops the train.
When we got to Toledo that darned
caboose had afIt wheels from stand-
ing still so long! WEARY.,
Will the Writer Please Call at the
Office for His Croix de Guerre-
With PalmI
Madam: I have been on the cam-
pus only a year, two of which were
spent overseas, so never had an op-
portunity to see "Patricia Passes."
Yesterday when I went to buy a ticket
the manager told me that only women
were admitted.
I did a. Julian Eltinge and got in.
It was a warm night. Any man will
tell you that beards flourish in hot
weather.
And-
During the second act *he moss
started to 'grow on my, face. I was
afraid someone would 'discover my
disguise, so I left the box and re-
paired to the foyer. Luckily, I had a
piece of sandpaptr with me, and a
few quick strokes removed the stub-
ble. I then returned to my seat and
finished reading the ads. on the cur-
tain. FEARLESS.
Tell Mehl Tell Meh !
(Note.-Each week our little girl
reporter will ask five prominent, peo-
ple, not connected with the Univer-sity,
their views on some vital topic of the
day.)
Question: "DO YOU THINK THAT
DR. EINSTEIN'S THEORY WILL
DISPLACE NEWTON'S LAWS?"
Mail Pouch: "No."
T. B.: "I just love Olive Thomas.
She is the most beautiful actress on
the screen today. She's luscious,
that's what!"
Q. T.: "I like the old-fashioned
night-shirt the best."
Miss Illtow: "To my mind, Ford
Sterling is the ideal move actor. He
and Nazimova make a swell team."
Ambrose X.: "Not being very con-
versant with this subject, 'tis difficult
to answer. But if the Doctor is in
favor of 2.75% I'll vote for him."
Be prepared for next week's ques-
tion: - "WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER
TO BE THE MOST DURABLE
TOOTHPICK?"
Spring Jokes
Bock Beer................5c

I BOSTICiA
Organiziations Representing Many
Localities Bring New Students
to University
SEARCH HOME TOWNS FOR
VALUABLE ATHLETIC MATERIAL
Michigan boasts of approximately
forty sectional clubs formed by the
students from different sections of the
country with the express purpose of
advertising the University in their
locality and drawing as many of the
high school athletes as possible.
This aim is accomplished by vari-
ous means. Many of the clubs give
dances, smokers and entertainments
in their home towns during vacation.
Every member makes a special effort
to get acquainted with prospective
Michigan students and swing them
the right way.
Alumni Helps
The clubs find the Michigan Alumni
a great help. Whenever a dance is
planned the old grads are always glad
to come across and show some of the
old spirit. Special effort has been
made in most of the clubs 'to get .in
touch with the Alumni and obtain
from them active co-operation.
There are several clubs that take
in a number of states. The Dixie
Club recruits' from every state south
of the Mason-Dixon line. The Copper
Country Club covers a large section
of the northern part of Michigan.
The Westerners Club and the Rocky
Mountain Club, as may be surmised
by their names, take in the entire
western part of the country. There
are four great organizatins-the
Kimberly Club, South African Union
Club, Italian Club, and the Chinese
Students' Club-that extend Michi-
gan's influence abroad.
Many state clubs are taking active
part in this work. Illinois, Pennsyl-
vania, Kentucky and Massachusetts
are organized. These state clubs are
unable to establish the intimate rela-
tions with the individual that the city
clubs accomplish, but by persistent
work they are making their influence
felt.
Have School Clubs
There are two county clubs, the
Ironwood Club of Gogebic county and
the Berry County Club. The Ferris
Institute, St. Johns Military Academy
and Culver clubs, composed of stu-
dents from those schools, are doing
all that is possible in their direction.
The city clubs comprise the largest
part of the whole. The Bay City Club,
Saginaw Club, Kalamazoo Club, Pon-
tiac Club, Bayonne, N. J., Club, Soo
Club, Detroit Club, Newark, N. J.,
Club, Rochester, N. Y., Club, and Cab-
met Club, of Washington, D. C., are
the most active. These city organ-
Continued on page 4.

On The, Ca M'PusI
In Other Years
March 28
119--University cloks set ahead
one hour in accordance with act of
congress.
1917-All-campus vote favors im-
mediate adoption of compulsory mil-
itary training as war with Germany
seems imminent.
1913-Campus responds to relief
calls as flood inundate Dayton and
other Ohio towns. Hundreds of stu-
dents and faculty men offer services
to fight floods.
1905-Hon. Champ Clark addresses
students in University hall.
1899-Five hundred students peti-
tion faculty to establish a chapter of
Phi Beta Kappa at Michigan. Presi-
dent Angell opposes movement.
1898-Two thousand students take
part in patriotic demonstratoins as
war with Spain nears. Washington
acknowledges offer to raise regiment
in Ann Arbor.
1895--Michigan joins North Central
Association of Colleges and Secondary
schools.
1892-Senior class of 1892 votes
against adoption of caps and gowns
for June Commencement exercises,
Shuter 's Claims
for "'George Didk
It ' Ring True

Clever Plot,
Music

Able Acting and Catchy
Furnish Basis for
Success

By Joseph A. Bernstein
The problem of presenting the Un-
iversity of the early days and the.
University of today in one Union
opera, in a manner that will count
for success for the production, is the
problem that is undertaken in "George
Did It" the fourteenth Michigan Un-
ion opera.
And the interesting thing about it is.
that the play as written by Russell
Barnes, '20,'presents the situation in
such a way that with the music and
talent of the actors that. are now
scheduled for the production, Director
Shuter's claims that "George Did It"
is the best Union opera, ring true.
Plot is Simple
Barnes has taken a plot, compar-
atively simple and has evolved there-
from a series of incidents present-
ing situations that are not only amus-
ing, but depict university life in Ann
Arbor in as an attractive manner as
could be expected.
Despite the fact that the play opens
back in the days of 1859, the results
obtained by the author and the director
as shown by rehearsals put the pro.
duction in a class with such musical
comedies as "Maytime." The first ac-
tion following clever musical prologue
introduces the picturesqueness of the
times, and presents just enought of the
plot to make the audience eager to see
the outcome. ,
A tilt between students of the Uni-
versity and city officials, as the result
of a student escapade, starts the ac-
tion with plenty of pep. The first
act is ended in a manner that leaves
those who witness it delightfully en-
tertained by a strain of humor that
pervades the whole play, while the
first act finale promises that which
really puts the play across-the sec-
ond act.
An interlude that is not lacking in
musical quality relieves the strain of
the plot and gives the audience an.
(Continued on page 2)

MOD1ERN EQUIPMENT AND NO'
ARCHITECTURE FEATURE
STRUCTURE
COMPLETE BUILDING T
COST THREE MILLI
Will Accommodate 650; Patients,
eluding 'Wards and Private Roo
-Furnishes Ideal Clinie
(By I. S. H.)
The steady growth of tht Unive
hospital since its founding indic
in a measure, the appreciation of
people of the state for the servic
has rendered. From a small start
institution has developed until t
it stands as the greatest teac
hospital in the country. Each :
more than 9,000 patients are tre
iwthin its walls and fully as many
treated as "out patients," that is, 1
do not require beds.
Besides the instruction of mOe
students ibthe clinical branches,
hospital is an infirmary for the
tire state. Every county sends
quota. The rural districts that I
no means 'of caring for their i
avail themselves of the hospital,
ceiving the best service in the 0
try at a cost far less than they ci
expect of a local institution.
Wards Congested
This popularity has made itself
in the congestion of the wards.
1917 the need for'more room bec
so pressing that the state legisla
made an appropriation of $325,$00
the first of three like sums for
erection of a xyw hospital.
money was clearly insufficient for
realization of the plans made. At
time the war interfered, and prev
ed the beginning of operations, but
plans were completed. When co
tions permitted the actual work 'to
gin,- everything was in readiness.
. Two years after, the first appro
tion, in 1919, the lump sum 'of $
000 was voted in addition to the
vious amounts. Thus v grand t
of $1,075,000 was placed at the
posal of the University for the e
tion of the foundation and out
walls complete. This money wa
furnish no part of the equpmen,
it was left for the next legslatur
finish the building and equip the
pital for 650 patients. The buil
is so designed that 1,200 patients
be taken care, of when it is P
equipped.
Built Like "Y"
The finished plans call for t
separate buildings connected by
ridors. The main structure will b
the shape' of two Ys with the
together, dividing into the bran
at the ends. It will be 425 feet
and wil have six stories above
basement. In front of this will
the administration building; 158
in length and' having three 0tc
above the basement. To the rea
the hospital will be the laora
and clas rooms, a building of 256
long and 10 stories including the b
ment.
The hospital will bt entirely
contained. It is of the modified b
type. In the design of- the main bi
ing Albert Kahn, the architect, n
use of every known method to o
a maximum amount of light, air
accessibility. The floor plan is
arranged that students will have
access to the beds of the patents
any-noise occasioned by the class
the building can in no way reach
sick.
Conserve Space
The entire struct e is built on
unit principle. The laboratory wi:

a system of unit laboratories
Continued on page 4.

...r
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