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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 24, 1920 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-24

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Ti

MICHIGAN I

Mi

ally

-cifg

OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN RUIEST
ublished every morningexceptG Monday during the Univer.
ear by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
he Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for
lication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
ed in this paper and the local news published therein.
ntered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor. Michigan, as second
matter.
ubscription by carrier or mail, $j.5o.
flices: Ann Arbor Press building, Maynard street.
'hones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
oommunications not to exceed Soo words, if signed, the sig-
e not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of
and notices of events will be published in The Daily at the
tion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Daily' office.
ned communications will receive no consideration. No man-
t will be returned unless the writer, incloses' postage.
he Daily does not necessarily endorse the sentiments ex-
d in the communications.
What's Going On" notices will not be received after 8 o'clock
e evening preceding insertion.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
AGING EDITOR.... .........HARRY 'M. CAREY
Editors-
Mark K. Ehlbert Edgar L. Rice
C. M. Campbell Joseph A. Bernstein
George Brophy Hugh Hitchcock
ials................H. Hardy Heth, Lee M. Woodruff
..... ........... ..Renaud Sherwood
Assistant ................ .............John I. Dakin
Assistant ...........................Brewster Campbell
......... .Robert C. Angell
n's Department......................Marguerite Clark
raph................Thomas Adams, Thornton Sargent Jr.

cGurk
.Lane
e Waldo
Weber
Lamport

Assistants
G. E. Clarke
Thomas J. Whirlery
R.W. Wrobleski;
George Reinder
Dorothy Monfort
Minnie Muskatt

fore the shoot. In the first place, University men
will have to put up a good fight for positions on the
state team, as a number of old' 'national guard
cracks, some of whom made excellent records oil
the state team last year, will without a doubt com-
pete again. The greater the field, the better the
choice; and the University should have all its best
men out for the preliminaries.
"THOSE GOOD OLD DAYS"
When. the graduate pays a visit to his universi,
lights up his pipe and harks back to "the good old
days," the college man of today, filled with stories
of the things 'we used to do," is apt to feel that he
is being cheated out of something-that his collego
life is a lifeless, inane thing in comparison to that
lived by the student of a few years ago. He hears
of theater rushings, great football 'celebrations, and
kindred sports and wishes that he had been fortu-
nate enough to have graduated from high school a
decade sooner.
Was life really any happier then than it is to-
day? Any event takes on an added glamour after
years of retrospection. If we will be honest with
Qurselves we will admit that a number of events in
our own lives have been elevated above the com-
monplace in our estimation through constant remin-
iscence.
This is what has happened to the graduate. While
going through the routine of daily work and pleas-
ures he was not conscious of any extreme happi-
ness which would surpass that of future genera-
tions. Life was to him what ours is to us today,
and he took away with him the pictures of this
life. Returning in later years and seeing an un-
familiar set of students doing things differently, he
recalls the glorified version of his own under-grad-
uate days and concludes that 'his colleagues had a
far better time than we are having.
Our own experiences are the most vivid to us.
Undoubtedly we, too, will think that we were far
better off than the generations succeeding us. We
should realize this when we hear the old Michigan
man tell of the ideal days of his college life, rather
than bemoan the fact that we could not have lived
earlier to enjoy his times.
The Telescoe
The infinite pathos of the following will }e ap-
preciated by any one who has had the same tragic
experience with his brand new derby.
Ah, she was a giddy charmer,
On this make no mistake,
And she vowed a deep impression
On susceptive me she'd make.

NEW BOOKS PUT ON SALE EACH DAY
WATCH THE DAILY FOR SPECIAL FEATURES

TWO ,
STORES

GRAHA
"George Did It"
BOTH ENDS OF THE DIAGONAL WALK

TWO
STORES

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DETROIT UNITED LINES
(Oct. 26, 1919)
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-6:xo a.
m., and hourly to 9:to p. m.
Jackson Limited and Express Car~ :481
a. mn., and every hour to 9:48 p. m. (Ex'
presses make local stops west of Ann Arbor.)
Local Cars East Bound-6:o5 a. im., 9:es a.
m. and every two hours to 9:05 p. m., io:5o
v. m. To Ypsilanti only, 11:45 p. M., 1:10
a. in., and to Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Ypsilanti.
Local Cars West Bound-7 :48 a. am. and
t2:20 a. ,.
ANN ARBOR CHOP SUET,
Excellent CHOP SUEY from
11:84 a. m. to midnight
Steaks and Chops 814 '. State

ttillil t tu tu ttlltlt t litttlutlttl tuttinulls ltntuttttuttt .ull llttlln! ,d
3 Just Received--
Leonard A Wood
Administrator, Soldier and Citizen
= By
Prof. William Herbert Hobbs
PRICE $2.00
UNIVERSITY,
W VV-rIEBOOKSTORES
George Did It George Did it
' tnlttl lliiti nitlll tltfillt iltlllt~t1111111111 111 t'illl tttl tt ittstlt![Illtlllftttitll

Have You Visited

Winefred Biethan
Robert D. Sage
Marion ,Nichols
Frances Oberholtzer
Edna Apel
E. P. Lovejoy

GRAHAM'S

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 964
ESS MANAGER...............PAUL E. CHOLETTE
.sing......... ..LeGrand A. Gaines, Mark B. Covell
and Classified Ads.....................Henry Whiting
tion ........... ....................Edward Priehs
tion........................Curt P. Schneider, R. A. Sullivan

w

a

QUALITY

SERVICE

mbrecht
'win
Kerr'

Assistants
F. M. Heath A. P. Joyce
Sigmund Kunstadter Robt.Sommerviille
Harold Lindsay Arthur L. Glazer

Persons wishing to secure information concerning news for any
issue of The Daily should see the night editor, who. has full charge
; .of all news to be printed that night.
The night editors for the week will be: Monday
night, Mark K. Ehlbert; Tuesday ight, Edgar L.
Rice; Wednesday night, George Brophy; Thursday
night, Hugh Hitchcock; Friday night, Chesser
Campbell; Saturday night, Joseph Bernstein.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24, 1920.
A CRUSADER AGAINST "DRY ROT"
President-Elect Marion Leroy Burton inspired
every progressive Michigan man and woman with
his recent speeh at Minneapolis in which he served
formal notice of his future policy with the words,
'Dry rot' in our educational institutions must go."
In emphasizing that the education he stood for
must be a dynamic process of preparing students to
meet and solve real problems in a real world, our
coming executive struck directly at the heart of a
certain still-lingering attitude in University com-
munities everywhere. This is the "know-noth-
ing" indifference of the average discussion group,
whether in fraternity, sorority, or dorm, toward any
problem outside of a narrow University sphere.
The student bodies of American universities, Dr.
Burton ,declares, must be aroused to the responsi-
bilities of the, day. .
President-Elect Burton's methods of going at his
ideal are very practicable; he asks, first, that in-
terest be so stirred up in topics of national impor-
tance as to cut out ,the ridicule which ordinarily
keeps them out of conversation; second, that uni-
versities be made what their name truly implies, by
cutting out such work as should really be accom-
plished in high schools and junior colleges; and fin-
ally, that the vice of superficiality which has eaten
deep into the American educational system be
struck out of it forever, and a standard of hard
work and thorough thinking substituted in its place.
The ideals which our future president puts forth
are wortjhy of the good opinion which the Univer-
sity has formed of him; and in giving them life and
power he may be assured of the support of an
awakening Michigan, which cares no more for "dry
rot" than he.
A CALL FOR THE DEAD SHOTS
Whether Boches, .ducks, or range targets have
been his game, the average man who has fired a
rifle acquires an interest in shooting and likes to
keep his hand in. The numerous ranges which ex-
isted all over the country even before the war prove
the universal appeal of the sport, which naturally
has been given a tremendous impetus by military
training.
The ranks of the crack shots have been filled by
innumerable sharpshooters and medalists who had
never pulled trigger before the war; and the win-
ning of national honors is no longer going to be a
closed affair between the old established clubs. Serv-
ice teams carried off all the donors at the Caldwell
meet last summer; and with demobilization the
chances are that squads made up largely of ex-serv-
ice men will be the strorngest bidders at Camp Perry
from July 31 to August 28 this year. The Univer-
sity Rifle club, which organized for preliminary
work Friday night, is fortunate in having a large
field of just this sort 6f material to draw from.
If Michigan is to rank high in national rifle
standing, however, her crack shots will have to
come out loyally and get in 'allpossible practice be-

AN EXCLUSIVE BOOTH
OurA TTESpecial"
A LITTLE CHATr

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TEACHERS
Do you want to secure the
Best Position and the "High Dol-
lar" in salary next year? If so,
write Today for our Salary
Schedule and Literature. Only
4% Comm. Payable in Fall.
Central & Western States.
HEUER TEACHERS' AGENICY
Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Courteous and' satisfactory,
TREATMENT to every custom-
er, whether the account be large
or small.
The Ann Arbor Sayings Bank
Incorporated 1869
Capital and Surplus., 550.000.00
Resources.........4,000.000.00
Northwest Cor. Main & Huron
707 North Unversity Ave

lI
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UDERTY AT MAYNARD

MALCOLM DUILDI*6

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So her smile was most bewitching
As'beside me down she sat,
And she made a great impression,
But she made it on my hat.

Dog Bites Twelve Girls.-N. Y. Times head.
Lucky it didn't happen in Ann Arbor or every-
body would swear that the dog was a State street
fratcrnity mascot.
In order to satisfy the insatiable demand of the
public for literature in the truest sense of the word,
we have prevailed upon the celebrated author, Izee
Manordog, to allow us the privilege of reprinting
his latest story, "Diana's Crucible," the story of a
woman who loved her own husband.
I
The short swells of the bay shimmied ragged
streaks of orange from lights in the harbor. The
sweet stench of the Orient hung smellingly in the
hot air of the Far East summer night, and from
the crooked street came the subdued bl immering
of the water front. On the far end of the piazza of
the "Caraumba" sat a man and woman in steamer
chairs. Presently he spoke.
II
"Diana," he said, his voice low yet clearly audi-
ble, "everyone thinks that I am different--that I
can do what others cannot. Foolishly I thought
that I could play with fire and not be burnt. But
now I know that I was wrong; we cannot leave
these things behind us'-they haunt us to our
graves. This thing will leave its ineffacable, in-
eradicable scar on you. In a mazi it can be forgiven
but you are a woman and it is always the woman
who pays. Think, wxhat: would your husband say ?"
She made a tired little motion with her beauti-
ful hands and then said unemotionally, "He
knows."
"He knows?" echoed the man in an incredulous,
strained voice. And then in a tone of mingled
triumph and reproach, "If he knows why does he
allow you to go on with this ?"
The woman gazed with unconcealed contempt at
the man who seemed powerless in the grip of an
overpowering fear. Then she continued in the
same unemotional tone, "He not only knows, but
he agrees with you."
"HIe agrees with you?" he shrieked in a high
pitched frenzied voice.
"Yes," she replied, "'he agrees with me in think-
ing that one can shave the eyebrows and still not
have bristles." J. W. K.
Famous Closing Lines
"I'm struck by the beauty of this place," he mut-
tered as his goad looking wife hit him with the
rolling pin.
NOAH COUNT.

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J. L. CHAPMAN
JEWELER
A14D OPTOMETRIST
1 3 SOUTH MAIN STREET
SCHOOL OF
DANCING
Private lessons in modern
ball-room dancing.
JEANETTE -
KRUSZKA
Studio;
516 E. William St.
Phone 1422-J
Residence Phone 1780-W
BranCh Nickels Arcade

4 '

THERE'S ONLY ONE WA Y to make' good

clothes, ready to wear . one
time-by hand.

garment at a

HIRSH, WICKWIRE CLOTHES
are all cut and stitched by hand. That's why they
are the finest-ready to wear-in the world today.
We invite you to investigate these good clothes
without any obligation to purchase.
Wag ner& Co.
303-305 South Slate Street

Ladies' Party Gowns a Specialty
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Organized 1868
FIRST ANN ARBOR MEMBER
OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE
SYSTEM

i

OLDEST NATIONAL BANK
IN MICHIGAN
3 Per Cent Paid on Savings

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