100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 23, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WARMER TODAY

wA

Of

ill

trt~i~a

rn

'

DAY AND) N
SERA

!l

. XXX. No. 12 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 23, 1920. PRICE THREE

S15 H S S M I N I S T E R O FS1 , C C P
TIRE EBERT-BAUER CABINET
EXPECTED TO QUIT
POSTS
RLIN AND LEIPSIC
CALM SAYS REPORT
nation in Ruhr Region and Are
Occupied by Allies Unfavor-
able

UNITED STATES TO GIVE STATUE TO
FRANCE; ANN ARBOR WILL RAISE $250

(By Associated Press)
Berlin, March 22,-Gustave Noske,
minister of defense presented his re-
signation to President Ebert this aft-
ernoon and the president accepted it.
Other cabinet changes are imminent.
It is annopuned that the independ-
ents today demanded a definite labor
cabinet, and that the government is
considering the demand.
CABINET MAY RESIGN
Berne, March 22.-The whole Ebert-
Bauer c binet probably will resign
according to advices from Berlin. The
crisis has been brought about by the
opposition aroused by the agreement
with the trade unions, especially in
the aural districts.
The situation is the Western indus-
trial regions still is very serious t
advices add.
BERLIN CALM'
Paris, March 22.-Berlin is calm, ac-
cording to reports reaching the Ger-
man peace delegation here tonight.
Part of the striers have resumed
work and .psts and railroads are
working but not the subways or tram-
ways.
Leipsic is calm, the delegation ad-
vices say but the situation in the Ruhr
region, and most of the area occupied
by the Allies, is most unfavorable.
Johann Giesverts, minister of posts
and telegraph is down there for a
parley with the leader. of the com-
munists. '
RILROAD WAGE BOARD
FORMITION COMPLETED
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 22.--Formation
of the joint railroad wage board was
completed here toniht by the con-
ferences committees representing the
railroad corporations and the 16 rail-
road unions. .
The bard now is ready to begin
consideration of the wage demand of
the 2,000,000 workers made last Au-
.gust and which have since been before
the president without a settlement be-
ing reached.
The board today began the task of
re-examination of the records and
data gathered by the wage statistical
board of the railroad adminstration
with respect to the workers' clain.
SENIOR LITS TO ELECT CLASS
DAY CELEBRITIES WEDNESDAY
The senior literary class will hold
a meeting at 4 o'clock Wednesday aft-
ernoon in room 205 Mason hall for the
purpose of electing the following off-
cers for the class day: Class poet,
class orator, class historian, and class
prophet.
Besides the other business coming
6p in this meeting, there will be re-
ports from the Pipe and Cane and
from the soical committees
UNION ANNUAL MEMBERS
TO GET TICKETS TODAY'
Annual members of the Union
will be given an opportunity to
secure -Union tickets when the
advance sale for this class of
members begins at 2 o'clock
this afternoon at the Union box
office. Numbers 'distributed
from the desk will determine
the place of students in the line
for tickets.
The same class of members
also secure tickets at the same

' hour on Wednesday and Thurs-
I day afternoons.

Funds for French Memorial to Be
Raised by National Campaign
As a fitting sequel to the gift of the
Statue of Liberty to the United States
by France in 1885 comes the announce-
ment of a national campaign for the
purpose of raising funds to erect on The
site of the first battle of the Marne a
colossal statue to serve as America's
gift to France in commemoration of
the victory won there in 914.
In the same manner as the various
Liberty Loans were apportioned, the
national committee has divided the es-
timated cost of the memorial at $250,-
000 among tbl different states. Mich-
igan's quota is $7,000, of which $250
has been assigned to Ann Arbor.
Small Subscriptions
Since th entire sum necessary is
comparatively small, it has been de-
cided that individual subscriptions be
limited to 25 cents, in order that the
gift may really come from the Amer.
41can people as a whole arld ot be the
'donation of a small minority. This
procedure parallels the method by
which funds were raised by the French
for the Statue of Liberty, the limit at
that time having been placed at one
franc.
_ MaeMonnies to Design Statue
Frederick MacMonnies, the distin-
guished American sculptor, is now
working on sketches of the memorial.
MacMonnies is well known in France
as well as in America, having been
in that country during the war, at
which time he gave his studio near
RECOUNTS EXPERIENCES
AMO LABRADOR FOLK
DR. WILFRED T. GRENFELL DES-
CRIBES MISERABLE CON-
DITIONS
Experiences among the fisher folk
of Labrador was the subject of Dr.
Wilfred T. Grenfell's lecture last
night in Hill auditorium. The lec-
ture was 'illustrated with colbred
slides.,
On Dr. Grenfell's first cruise in this
territory, he and his staff made a sur-
vey and analysis of the various dis-
eases of the coast people. The pre-
ponderant cases were found to be tub-;
erculosis, and infantile paralysis,
with acertain amount of scrofula,
beri-beri, and blindness. During the
first year the doctor's work was car-
ried on among 30,000 of these hospit-
able and simple folk.
A system of non-sectarian hospit-
als, co-operative stores and schools
which, Dr. Grenfell says have done a
great good for the poor folk, have
been introduced on the sparsely set-
tled coast.
The scenery of the Labrador and
New Foundland coastsrwasydescribed
as rivaling that of Norway.'
Both Dr. Grenfell and Dean Victor
C. Vaughan, who introduced the
speaker, emphasized the need of funds
with which to carry on the work.
Those interested are requested to
send and contributions to M Evans
at Lane hall.
OLD DIXIE CLUB
TO RE-ORGANIZE
Re-cjrganization of the old Dixie
club will take place at a meeting of
all men from the South at 7:15 o'clock
tonight in room 323-325 of the Union.
Officers for the following year will
be elected at this meeting, and a mus-
ical program will be furnished by

Sandy Wilson's five-piece jazz band.
The Dixie club was formally one of
the strongest of, the sectional clubs
and every effort is being made to
build the club up to its former
strength and prestige. All men who
live south of the Mason-Dixon line or
who formerly lived in Dixie are elig-
ible for membership in the club.
MARJORY SPRINGER, '20, DIES
AT HER HOME IN PORT HURON
Marjory Caroline Springer, ex-'20,
the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
William Springer, died at 6:30 o'clock
yesterday morning at the family res-
idence, 803 Beard street, Porc Huron.
Miss Springer was taken sick while
a sophomore at the University, and
since then her health has steadily de-

the Marne river to the French govern-
ment for usd as a hospital.
The local campaign, which will last
until the end of the week, has been
placed by Mayor E. M. Wurster in the
hands of a committee consisting of
L. A. Butler, superintendent of
schools; L .L. Forsythe, principal of
the high school; George E. Lewis,
president of the city council who will
act as treasurer of the committee; and
Registrar Arthur G. Hall, who will
ahandle the campaigA for the Univer-
sity.
Registrar Hall has named the fol-
lowing student committee: Carl E.
Johnson, '20, Marguerite Chapin, '20,
and Harry M. Carey, '20.
At places on the campus, to be an-
nounced later, subscriptions will be
received from students, while the
banks will collect those from the1
townspeople.

Ann Aror Sees
Aurora Borealis
Two years ago when the sky was
colored there were dire predictions
among the pessiniistic that the world1
would end; the optimistic declared
that the war would end.
Last night both classes of men had
the chance towitness the phenomenon
without trying to connect it with any
event to come. They recognived it as
the Aurora Borealis.
That interest was shown in the
lights was evident, for although the
lights were observednat about 7
o'clock, numerous phone ,calls con-.
tinued to come in to the office. Tele-
phone calls also carried questions,
some asking if the lights really were
the aurora and others asking what
caused the illumination.
The most plausible theory is that
the emanation causes an ionization in
the 'rpper strata-simple, isn't it?

"U fM rolm eig flyChaotic, "Says Burton to Alumni

President-elect Marion L. Burton
paid 'a flying visit to Ann Arbor Sun-
day afternoon, being ain the city only
from 3 to 6 o'clock. He conferred with
President Harry B. Hutchins on re-
pairs and alterations to be made on
his new home in the Angell home-
stead.
Doctor Burton came to Ann Arbor
from brand Rapids, where he ad-
dressed Grand Rapids Alumni asso-
ciation at their annual dinner which
was given in his honor. Doctor Bur-
ton said in part:.
"I will say at the outset that there
is no danger of Minnesota convincing
me that I will be happier in Minneap-
'olis than in Ann Arbor, as I have told
them that I am determined to marry
the girl, and I will. The University
of Michigan attracted me first because
of its 40,000 former graduates who can
be counted upon to lend their powerful
influence to the support of the insti-
tution.
"Problems Cijaotic"
"The problems at the University of
Michigan, I must confess, are delight-
fully chaotic," he continued. "There
are financial conditions to meet. Sal-
aries must be raised. We must be able
to compete successfully with the in-
dustrial organizations which are at-
tracting our professors by larger
wages. I am confident that we shall
be able to face the legislature soon
'and successfully ask for larger
funds."
Dr. Burton then told of hi. concep-
tions of what must be taught at the
University.
"The first essential of education is
an active mind. We must iear down
all barriers and in some way prick
and goad the minds of hundreds of
under graduates until they fairly glow
with an almost insatiable curiosity
for knowledge which will aid them in
grappling with the problems of to-
day.
Accuracy Needed
"Our schools, as never before, must
demand. accuracy. From the stand-
point of American life/as a whole, the
problem involved is fundamental.
Superficiality is an American vice.
Historically speaking, we have been a

must be aroused. Our duty, as edu-
cators, is to place a higher value upon
the art of teaching. The results' to
be secured are tw-fold. First, we
mustehave students who study. That
is to say, students who are actually
concerned about their understanding
of the truth and life. Secondly, we
must have teachers who teach. That
is to say, those who recognize that a
human being is one of the final val-
es of life, and, therefore, actually
proceed upon the hypothesis that the
thing which counts is not the quantity
of material presented, but the actual,
positive, avkening of . the human
spirit."
Prof. Ralph W. Aigler of the faculty
athletic board of the University was
the first speaker. His address took
the form of an explanation of the Uni-
versity's athletic showing the past
year.
Regent Benjamin S. Hanchett, of
Grand Rapids, welcomed Doctor Bur-
ton to the city, and said, in doing so.
that he was welcoming him to the
State of MTehigan for the next 25
years.
LATE WIRE BRIEFS
Washington, March 22.-The selec-
tion of! Henry Morgenthau, former
ambassador to Turkey as ambassador
to Mexico, is expected to be announc-
:ed soon by the White House. No of-
ficial announcement was available to-
day but it is known that Morgen-
thau's name is foremost among those
under consideration.
Olympia, Wash., March 22 --Ratifi-
cation of the proposed suffrage amend-
ment to the Federal constitution was
completed by the Washington legis -
lature today when the senate passed
ta resolution modifying the ariend-
ment. The resolution had previously
been passed by the house. Washing-
,ton was the 35th state to ratify the
-amendment.
Washington, Mnarch 22.-Plans for
counting the ballots in the Michigan

CARTER QUITS AS
GLEE CLUB LEADER
Refuses to Make Statement; Wheeler
to Succeed Him
Mr. Russell Carter, director of the
Glee club for the past year, resigned
his position yesterday. He refused late
yesterday evening to make any state-
ment for his action.
His place will be taken by Mr. Wil-
liam Wheeler, head of the vocal de-
partment of the University School of
Music.
UNION CHOOSES NEWI
COMMITTEE MEMBERS
Waldo M. McKee, '20E, was ap'point-
ed chairmok of the Union house com-
mittee, at a recent meeting of the
Union appointment committee. McKee
succeeds J. I. McClintock, '211, recent-
ly elected law vice-president of the
Union, and McKee's position as a mem-
ber of the house committee will be fill-
ed by Bruce Millar, '20, managing edi-
tor of the Michiganensian. Richey B.
Reavill, '22L, was appointed chairman
of the dance committee, succeeding
Grattan L. Rourke, '21.
A temporary concert committee was
also appointed, with William Gregg,
:20, as chairman. This committee will
shortly put on a moving picture in
Hill auditorium, with the Union or-
chestra, in connection with the musi-
cal activities of the Union. W. E.
Bandemer, '22E, was made chairman
of the registration cgmmittce for the
national Union convention, to be held
in Ann Arbor early In May. The re-
ception committee for the convention
will be composed of the student mem-
bers of the board of directors.
CHURCH MOVEMENT
AROUSES INTEREST
Interest in the Interchurch World
movement was awakened Sunday
night by the meeting in Hill audi-
torium when a large gathering of
students listened to several lectures
on the movement, its purposes and
functions.
The Rev. Lloyd C. Douglas open-
ed the meeting with a. prayer and
statement of the relation of the move-
ment to the University. Rev. J. M.
Wells of the First Baptist church gave
an illustrated lecture on the work be-
ing accomplished in the Orient, and
Mr. Wilbur B. Smith of New York told
of the need by the missions of all
types of educated men and women. o.
0. Stanclifield, '07, gave a short ac-
count of his experiences with the Y.
M. C. A. in India.
A few excerpts from the Wayfarer,
a picturization of the religious page-
ant recenty produced in Columbus,
were flashed on the screen.
MAROONS WIN FIRST
MATCH FOR TITLE
(Special to the Daily)
Chicago, March 22.-The Chicago
basketball team nosed out the fast
Pennsylvania quintet, in the first of
three games for the national basket-
ball championship, by a score of 28-
24, played in Bartlett gymnasium to-

night.
The second game of this series is to
be played in Philadelphia, while the
third will be played at Princeton if a,
third game is found necessary to de-
cide the title.
The Maroons were greatly handi-
capped- by the absence r their cap-
tain, but despite this fact the team
put up a good fight. Sweeney, the
Pennsylvania forward, proved the
stellar player of the game.
Bulein }
Washingon, March 22.-The nomi-
nation of Bainbridge Colby as secre-
tary of state was confirmed late to-
day by the senate.'
It was understood that no objec-
tion was raised to confirmation of the
nomination, which has been the sub-
,ject of extended secret hearings by the
foreign relations committee.

Coach Fielding H. Yost, head n
tor of the Michigan Varsity fool
squad, is preparing for next ye
football season'
The famous football expert ,
ed Ann Arbor Monday with the
ject of arranging 'for spring fool
practice and lining up the gen
football situation.
"About the only thing there is
to be done is up to toe students
the alumni," he de'lared yeste'
afternoon.
Will Hold Spring Practice
"We're preparing to get the me
shape; therefore all we, need is
men. We're lined up for the sp
practice, we're planning on real w
outs for the summer' and we're g
to keep in touch with the boys t
gain that prestige in the ath
world that is likely to slip away I
Michigan if we don't keep plug
away."
Caomes from Chicago
The coach arrived in Ann A
Sunday afternoon after spending
past week in Chicago, where he
been making arrangements for
officials of the football games for
year. While there he attended
Conference track meet and was
guest of the Chicago Alumni ass
Spring practice for the Varsity:
,all squad, he announced, is sche
ed to begin on Ferry field Imn
ately after spring vacation. Apr
has been set as the first day of p
tice. Thesquad will be put in eb
of Assistant Coaches Douglas
Mather and Captain Goetz for the
week. On April 26 Coach Yost
arrive to take over persoally
training of his proteges.
Must Keep Up Good Work.
"I was very glad to see the wa
students and alumni took hold 1
'situation. They did good work -
they've got to keep it up," he
clared.
"We coaches can ask for this
'ask for that, we can do our bes
the football field, but we can't do
thing without material. At prese
looks like we ought to have1
pretty good material if the then
eligible. That is another thing foi
students to watch out for."
Comeback Not Discussed
"What, we've got to do is to
plugging. We've got a good star
that doesn't mean that we shoull
it go at that," he said.
Arrangements are being madE
keep the men on the squad in t
'with the situation and with' 4ll
tails of the spring worout.
spring training, the coach deck
would be highly valuable to the:
and therefore an' effort would
made to have them report regu
for the spring workout, -
Coach Yost will be in Detroil
day, where he will attend a mei
of the Detroit Alumni assocla
Plans are to be laid at that time I
little booklet telling of Michig
athletic fame, with complete recor'
conference seaons, o be distril
among the almni.
RAYMOND ROSS, EX-'17P, KL'
IN ANN ARBOR,MACHINE S
Raymond S. Ross, ex-'17P, so
Mrs. Nora Ross of Ann Arbor,
fatally injured Monday morning,
at work at the Ann !Arbor
chine company's 'plant., He - die
short time later at St. Joseph's s
tarium, without regalning consc
ness.
Ross enlisted in the Universit
Michigan Ambulance unit, which

here inl June, 1917. He was
transferred to the artillery,
which organization he saw se
with the American Expeditic
forces at Verdun and St. Mibiel.

Says

Future Depends Largely on
operation of Students and
Alumni

YOST -ARRIHVES TO
MAKE PLANS FOl
rI -
LINES UP GENERAL FOOTB
SITUATION; WOULD NOT
DISCUSS COMEBACK
"ALL WE NEED IS EN,
STATES GRID M Ni

'race of pioneers. It takes time to de- senatorial campaign will be discussed
velop a substantial civilization. Tem- tomorrow in the senate election sub-
peramentally, we are not well equip- committee of which Senator Watson,
ped for patient, thoroughgoing works republican, of Indiana, is chairman.
Our standards have been defective. Attorneys representing Senator New-
Our aim has been to turn' off a task berry and Henry Ford, the contesting
quickly. The war has produced a se- candidates, will attend the meeting.
rious restlessness among our people Alfred Lucking, attorney for Mr.
and our youth. If it has been difli- Ford, has written Chairman Dilling-
cult before, it will be almost impossi- ham urging "that the full and com-
ble now to settle down to thorough-
I lete invAQHrtin tio d d by MA

i

'going work in our colleges and unt-
versities. Oxford tutors, speaking of
American Rhodes scholars, say that
they seem to lack accuracy and, as a
rule, the power of a hard grind.'
Must Awaken Students'
"The public schools must awaken
their students. Any student of Amer-
ican education recognizes that a new
tendency is at work in our entire ed-
ucational system. The mechanism, ex-
ternality and formalism of our en-
tire educational system today is gen-
erally conceded.
Splendid Task
"This generation faces a splendid
task, and its unlimited potentialities
S P I R I T S?

pi esd iu. Ygau n or ere oy y Lne
senate-shall proceed without further
delay."
STRAW VOTE ON PRESIDENTIAtL
CANDIDATES TO BE HELD SOON
A straw vote on the various candi-
dates for presidential nomination on
the Republican ticket was decided up-
on yesterday by the executive commit-
tee of the University Republican club.
It is planned to have the vote taken
on the campus Friday, March 26. Gen-
erals Wood and Pershing, Governor
.Lowden, and Senators Johnson, Pin-
dexter and Harding are the candidates
whose names will be' placed on thet
ballots.1

clined.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan