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March 21, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

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IPAY AND N)
SERV

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 21, 1920.

PRICE T

OIS

NOSES

OUT

MICHIGA

I I I . -----------

Forged Checks
Passed In City
Police Declare
According to the chief of police,
more bogus checks are being passed
at the present time than ever be-
fore. Daily forged checks are be-
ing passed qn both State street and
downtown .merchants.
From 50 to 60 checks are in the
hands of the chief, and in his opin-
ion some united action should be
taken upon the part of the mer-
chants. .,
"There is undoubtedly an organized
gang who are responsible for this
situation," said the chief. "I have two
qr three Inen under suspicion but it
is almost impossible to trace the guil-.
ty parties."

Truman
States
lay con-!

SOVIETS INCREASE
IN GERMAN TOWNS
London Reports Expect Situation May
Become Much Worse.Before
Improvement
EBERT GOVERNMENT ASKS
ALLIES YOR FOOD SUPPLYj

retain his
unless that.
or the su-

ul (By Associated Press)
n London, March 20.-Conditions in
h Germany are expected to get much
worse before they improve, in the
opinon of British War Office officials
if based on the latest dispatches from
Germany. The officials express con-

OPERA TO, ISIT
HICAGO ON TRIP
Detroit, Flint, Grand Rapids, Battle
" Creek and Saginaw Included
In Tour
ALUMNI TO HAE CHARGE
OF TICKET SALES IN TOWNS
Detroit, Chicago, Flint, Grand Rap-
ids, Battle Creek, and Saginaw wilt be
the towns played visited by the 1920
Union Opera company, to present
"George Did It,' 'in its trip during the
spring vacation, according to the com-
mittee's announcement last night.
Four Pullmans- and two baggage
cars will convey the organization from
city to city. In all, 120 men will make
the trip, including orchestra, assist-
ants, and property men.
Opens in Flint
Monday night, April 12, the Opera
will open dn its road tour in the Ma-
jestic theater, Flint. Tuesday night,
April 13, "George Did It" will be pro-
duced in the Auditorium, Saginaw;
Wednesday night, April 14, Post theater
Battle Creel; Thursday night, April
, Powers' theater, Grand Rapids;
Friday night, April 16, Auditorium
theater, Chicago; and Saturday night,
April 17, in Orchestra hall, Detroit.x
Alumni will have complete charge
of ticket sales in all towns. They will
also provide dances and other enter-
tainments for members of the com-
pany in every place visited. Alumni
have first call on tickets.
Advance ticket sales to annual mem-
bers of the Union for the si per-
formances in Ann Arbor will begin
at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon, and
will continue at the same hour on
Wednesday and Thursday. Lines of
etudents will form if the concourse
for the idisposition of tickets from the
booth.
(Continued on Page Six)
URGES STUDENTS TAKE
DI F UPMISONARY WORK
DR. J. T. STONE DELIVERS FIRST
OF SERIES OF RELIGIOUS .
LECTURES
In an earnest appeal to the stu-
dents to use their lives to the best
advantage Dr. John T. Stone last
night made the first of the series of
lectures conducted by the"Y" authori-
ties in the campaign for religios
awakening on the campus. The sub-
ject of Dr. Stone's address was "The
Investment of a Life" and he gave
many interesting examples of men of
his own personal acquaintance who
had made the important decision of
their life work and who becamie emi*.
nently successful though in most in-
stances forced to endure many priva
tions.
Dr. Stone spoke at length on the
wonderful fields for missionary work
at the present time and urged stu-
dents to think seriously of the 6ppor-
tunity to consecrate their lives to this
work and thereby make their lives
worth while in this world by sacri-
ficing personal whims to the good of
civilization and mankind.
His manner was pleasing and well
ellil tar dfn intarta th 01t

Who stole the sign, at North Uni-
versity avenue and Twelfth street,
directing the stranger to the Univer-
sity hospital?
Details and clews are entirely lack-
ing, and as yet the motives f th4
person or p4rsojs committing the
misdemeanor has not been ascer-
tained.
Perhaps a collector of souvenirs
appropriated it for his collection, or
perhaps the material in the stolen
sign will be re-shaped as an instru-
ment to deal with the "military"
freshmen:
But the real facts are that the sign
is gone.
DE'hMOCRATIC CLUB'
TO BEORAIE
Temporary Executive Committee to
Plan Permanent Organization,
at Work
WILL HOLD 'SMOKER
LATER; MURPHY TO SPEAK
Not to be outdone by the Republi-
cans on the campus, a representative
group of Michigan students with de'm-
ocratic tendencies, yesterday took the
initial steps for the .organizaton of a
campus Democratic club.
Temporary officers forming an ex-
ecutive committee were selected from
the group at tIe meeting, to formulate
plans for the permanent organiza-
tion qf the club.
Elect Temporary Officers'
The committee of temporary offi-
cers is made up of the following: .L.
B. Doyle, '21L, chairman; L. S.
Daugherty, '22L, secretary; P. K.
Platts, '20; Bert McNeil, '22M; 0Jack
Dunn, '20; H. Fergus, '21E. and ,F.
McKowan, '21E. ,
Communication with the state Dem-
ocratic committee has been estab-
lished by the temporary organization
and actual campaigning on the cam-,
pus will be started so.
Plans are being laid for °a Demo-
cratic smoker to be held at the
Michigan Union some time in the
near future. Frank Murphy, '17L,
Assistant United States District At-
(Continued on Page Six)
BARBERS BOO 80ST PRICES

MOREHEAD,
CAPTURES

OHIO
HIGH

fidence that some sort of central gov-
ernment will ultimately prevail.
In the face of official messages to-
day it would appear that this belief is
based more on desire than on infor-
fation forwarded by British repre-
sentatives in Germany. These repre-
sentatives tell of the increasing num-
e ber of towns being taken' over by
e newly organized soviets.
Food is expected to be the decid-
o ing factor, and the Ebert govern-
ment has already requested the Al-
f lies to maintain the present system
o of supplying food stuffs, which have
1- become inadequate. With transpor-
n tation virtually suspended, many
- towns which heretofore have been
t better supplied than Berlin are be-
ginning to feel the pinch. ,
Combats Oontinue
- Berne, March 20. - Combats are
n continuing in'the Rhineland mining
district and mobs of strikers and
cimunists with hand grenades and
g steel helmets are patrolling the coun-
1 try, while troops are sending arm-
e ored trains against them.
y iFighting of a most violent nature
w is reported at Essen and Gelsen-
It kirchen, but the details are unknown
here as telgraphic and telephonic
f communication, with this 'district has
'_been cut off.
-I A Red army is reported forming at
s Aschsleben, and Quedlinburg. In
a these towns sharp encounters occur-
e red between troops and Spartacans
t and many persons were killed or
wounded. Fighting recommenced at
(Continued on Page Six)

Hospital Sign
Takes Leave Of
absence-Where?

WITH JOHNSON REELING OFF HUR
'ART SEVEN AND THEFITSSEC

SUCKER STATE'S TRA
COUNT 31 POINTS
MICHIGAN'S 27

Hair

Cuts Go to 50 Cents Followin
Journeymen's Petition

would cost a

learned that in view o
y and the humorous let
King and Newberry in
the defense, the juror
:ulty in agreeing that
had existed. Only on
aken on Newberry. I
for guilt.
JUNIOR-LIT
Y BIG SUCCES.

That the price of hair-cuts will be
raised to 50 cents, and the price of
shaves to 25 cents, is the result of ac-
tion taken by the boss barbers of Ann
Arbor at a meeting held Friday even-
ing at the city Y. M. C. A. This in-
crease becomes effective Monday,
March 22.
According to Mr. John P. Troja-
nowski, proprietor of a barber shop at
717 North University avenue, the
journeyman barbers had presented a
petition to the boss barbers, asking
for a raise in the prices of haircuts
and shaves.
"In order to meet present condi-
tions we must raise our prices. Oth-
erwise, there will soon be a shortage

BUTLER, THE MICHIGAN QARTER .
MILER, WHO CAME THROUGH
WITH A FIRST THAT WAS NOT
EXP ECTED OF HIM.
CASTFOR ANN UALPLY
MADELEINE HAZELTON AM ,EL-
IZABETH VICKERY HAVE
LEADING PARTS
Prof. J. Raleigh Nelson, director of
Masques, has announced the following
cast for the annual play, "The New
Lady Bantock," to be given May 121
and 13. t
Lady Bantock, Madeleine Hazelton,
'23;- Lord Bantock, Elizabeth Vickery,
'22; Martin Bennett, butler, Marion
Ames,. '20; Susanna Bennett, house-
keeper; Susan Verlenden, '20; Jane
Bennett, maid, Jeanne McPherson,
'21; Ernest Bennett, second footman,
Harriet Gustin, '22; Horonia Bennett,
still-room maid, Evelyn Rockwell,
'22.
The Misses Wetherell, aunts by
marriage, Alice Comfort, '21, and
Christine Murkett, '22; Dr. Freeman-
tle, local medical man, Anna McGurk
'20; Lord P. Newte, Helen Master, '21:
an actress friend, Mildred Henry, '22;,
other actress friends, Finette Martin,
'22, Isabel Kemp, '22, Grace Ohlmach-
, 2X, Gertrude Boggs,, '22 Amy
Loomis, ' 2, Frances Stevens, '21,
Edelaine Roden, '22, Anna Lindemul-
ler, '21, Frances Oberholtzer, '21, Is-
abelle Swan, '22, and Frances Maire,
'21.
This play will be open to both men
and women. All members of the cast
will meet at 4 o'clock Tuesday in
Barbour gymnasium.
ANDREW HAIGH TO
FEATURE CONCERT
Andrew C. Haigh, '19, will play two
of his own compositions at the Facul-
ty Twilight concert to be given at 3
o'clock this afternoon in Hill audi-I
torium.
Mr. and Mrs. William Wheeler, ten-
or and soprano, respectively, and Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Lockwood will also
contribute voice and violin numbers
with the assisance of Dorothy Wines-
(Continued on Page Six)

Ties with Hoffman of Iowa at SI
Giving Wolverine Captai
-Third Place
(Special to the Daily)
Chicago, March 20.-Emery's
tional work for the Illinois trac
here tonight made it possible f
Sucker state aggregation to no
star Michigan quintet out of t
door track title of' the western c
ence.
The Illinois winners counted
points, while the Wolverines
gather only 27 1-2. Wisconsin
ed in third place with 101-4 po
Three Records Broke
Three conference records wer
tered when Brown of Illinois
off the half mile in 1:59; the m
lay run in 3:29 by the Illinois
team; the 60 yard hurdle was
to read 7 3-5 seconds by the
tional Michigan captain, Carl
son. All of these are new reco
indoor meets.
A surprise was sprung when
head of Ohio State and Hoffm
Iowa reached six feet in the
jump, forcing Johnson of Michig
to third'place.
Butler of Michigan came in
points by leading all 440 yard i
with his time 52 2-5. Butler's si
was a surprise.
Fifty yafd dash, won by. Jo
'SUMMARY .
(Michigan); second, Kelly, (Mi
ta); third. Poliak, (No' Wes
fourth, Strawn, (Northwe ).
5 3-5 seconds. Sixty yar .' hig)
dies, won by Johnson, (Michigan
'ond, Andres, (Wisconsin); thir
paford,'(Wisconsin);fourth1
son, (Minlesota). Time, 7 '-
onds. New Conference record.
hundred and forty y.ard dash, v
Butler, (Michigan); second,
(Illinois); third, Kayser, (Wisco
fourth, Dahoe, (Illinois). Time,
5 seconds. Half mile, won by f
(Illinois); second, Spink, . (Illi
third, Shuh, (Illinois) ; fourin,
holder, (Michigan). .Time, 1:5
Conference record. Mile run, w.
Yates, (Illinois); second, W
(Illinois); third, ,Otis, (Chi
fourth, Ferguson, (Ohio). Time
2-5. Two mile run, won by F
(Purdue); second,. Beswort, (
western); third, Crump, (Wisc
fourth, Naughton, (Ilinois).
9:55 4-5.
Shot put, won. by Higgins °
go).; second, Baker (Michigan);
Weiss (Illinois); fourth, Sundt
cosin). Distance, 42 .feet, A10
Running high jump, won by
head (Ohio and Hoffman (
thirds and fourth, Johnson (Mi
and Osborn (Illinois). Height,
Pole vault, won by Hawker (
sota); second, Cross and We
(Michigan); fourth, Devine(
Buchanan (Illinois); Hill (
Davis (Northwestern); T
I'sin); Wilder (Wisconsin);
(Minnesota). eHight 11'feet, 9
Relay, won by Illinois; seon
'cago; third, Michigan; fourth,
sota. Time, 3:29. New Coni
record.
Zionists Discuss Eleeton of De
Plans for the election ofl a d
to the national conference c
Zionist Organization of Americ
discussed by the board of d
of the Intercollegiate Zionist
at a special meeting held at 7
Friday night in Lane hall.
Will Speak to Guild
Dean John .R. Effinger of th
ary college, is scheduled to a
the Unitarian Guild forum' a

wasv v u+rvwr wJu},a, v. v. .r .r, rv" ,vf: w++ w:Y

S

Will Discuss Scientifie Subject
Dr. G. I. Naylor will discuss vener-

red and fifty students at-
first junior lit party nt
ren Saturday afternoon in
assembly hall. Dancing
;o 5:30 o'clock to the
Sandy" Wilson's' seven
Ara was the entertain-
r class succeeded in mak-
refit from the dance. Al
president of the class,
he was well satisfied with
Chaperons for the occa-
Mrs. Myra B., Jordan,
Conklin, Miss Gertrude
Prof. and Mrs. J. R.

eal prophylaxis at 3 o'clock this after- uactte Oi~rS n 3 La
eo- of barbers," declared Mr. Troja-
noon at the Homoeopathic hospital. who formed a large percentage of the nowski.
This is the fourth of a series of lec- audience. The meeting was held at All local' barber shops, as well as
tures given by the University faculty the Congregational church and was the one in the Michigan Union, will
and is open to the general public. well attended. be affected by this increase.
"Doe" Gathers Overcoats as Winter Gives Way to Spring

Today is the 21st day of March. Ac-
cording to the Moan's Liver Pill al-
manac, the signs of the zodiac and the
omnipotent ouija board, that makes to-
day the first day of spring.
The spring season always has a har-
binger. You can hunt from Richard-
Uen to Richard Harding Davis, but
you'll never find a spring without a
harbinger.
Down near the M. C. depot, the kids
are yelling "knuckle down;" the Main
street stores show new stocks of hats

and furs for the ladies.; the city edi- did not forget her harbinger. Not a
tor got a haircut yesterday; the all- bit of it.
American freshman got out his white It became the good fortune of one
shoes this morning; all these are har- of our best known Ann Arbor friends1
bingers of spring. to make the cast this year in.the coy
But they don't satisfy: Jack London and coquettish part of harbinger. Yes-.
would not have been' able to get more terday afternoon ,he made his appear-
than'"three pages out of any of them. ance in this new and fitting role.
None of these reflect the spirit of the State street, soft breezes, dickie birds'
season, the casting off of the old and singing, warm sun shining, and- en-{
the birth of the new. ter-"Doc" with a double armful of
Rut spring has batted true to form. winter overcoats.4
She did not drop in unannounced, she Spring has come.

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