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March 20, 1920 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

MICHI AN

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:S TIERS MEET
FINALS TODAYt

Between Planck Brothers'
uses Greatest Amount of
Interest

DUNPHY PRESENT
IT STYLES OF GAME

Four new campus wrestling cham-
pions will be determined this after-
noon in Waterman gymnasium when
the finals in each class of the wrestl-
y;",ing tourney are staged. The eight; men
whonhave core successfully through
a large field of contestants will meet
in, afinal battle for supremacy.
"eFor 'the title winner in -each class,
there is provided a handsome silver
loving cup, which will be suitably en-
graved with the winner's name,
weight, and year. T he runner-up in
each division will receive his numer-
als, .
Rules. Remain Saime'
The rules for today's matches are.
substantially the same as have ob-
tained throughout the tofurney. The
matches will be of 10 minutes dura-
tion. if no fall is obtained, the men
will rest thre _ miautes and then con-1
tinue five minutes more, at the end
of which time the judges will give
their decision.
]Decisions' will be judged, on the basis
of aggressiveness and skill displayed.
All toe-holds, full-nelsons, hammer-
locks, and struggle holds are bar-
rea.
In the lightweight , class, Larry
Packard will meet E. W. Gillard. Gil-
lard is a newcomer to the wrestling
game but has displayed considerable
ability in his matches, winning all of.
them in fast timhe. Packard has had
considerable experience, being light-
weight runner-up in 1918 and causing
considerable stir among the welter-
weights this year before he was fin-
ally eliminated in that class.,
Dicken Strong Wrestler
The welterweight contestants are
D. W. Dicken and C. L. Dyni. This
pair will make things interesting from
the start. Both seem to be of about
equal strength and ability and are in
fine. 'condition. Dicken's wrestling
specialty seems to be a double bar
hold, 'which may decide the con-
test if it is once obtained.
Two different brands of wrestling
will be displayed in the middleweight
battle'between H. G. Dunphy and C. P.
Haller. Dunphy is the aggressive type
of wrestler, always working on the
offensive and resembling in the tiger-
like ferocity of, his attack, the late
Frank Gotch.
On the other hand, Halier,'aformer
member of the Cornell wrestling
team, is cool and deliberate, in search-
ing out an opponent's weak points. He
is also possessed of an almost im-
pregnable defense,
Brothers Meet ili Final
In the heavyweight class, an unus-
nal situation is presented, in that two
brothers meet to contest for the
wrestling supremacy of the campus.
George Planck, '23, has had consider-
able experience with the game as a
physical instructor in the army and
has won- his matches this year with
apparent ease.
His main reliance is a crushing body
scissors, with which he has eliminated
all his opponents so far.
Joe Planck, '21L, was middleweight
champion in 1917, and though still
properly a middleweight, is wrestling
in the heavyweight class. His favorite
hold is a head-scissors and wrist lock,
which, combined with wider experi-
ence, he will match against the up-
erior weight and strength of his
younger brother.
The matches will begin promptly at
4 o'clock on the main floor of the gym-
nasium. The officials for the day are:.
Referee-Andy Meadows., Timekeep-
er-P. M. Shaw. Judges-H. N. Now-
len, Roy Johnson, and Frank Czysz.
Britishers Oppose Prohibition Move
London, March 19.-Huge anti-pro-
hibition posters have appeared on
London billboards. One shows a

brawny British workingman fishing a
tiny Uncle ,am out of his glass of
beer, with the words: "Lumme,.
there's-a microbe in my beer." An-
other displays the figure of 'W. E.
Johnson, American prohibition, cam-
paigner, as an angel by the bedside
of "John Citizen" to whom he croons
a lullaby, while he binds him with
iron shackles, hand and foot.
Patronise the Daily Advertisers.

\I

BEARDSLEY, WHO WITH CAPTAIN
JOHNSON, Is 1iICHIGAN'S HOPE.,
-FOR POINTS IN THE HIGH HULt-
DLE RACE. .
Tad Wienan Will'
Return Next Year
"It is practically certain now that I
will be there next year," writes Tad
Wieman, captain-elect of the 118 foot-
ball team in a recent letter to Mr.
Roscoe B. Huston of Detroit. The
big fellow goes on to say. that he hai
sent signed statements to Piofessor
Aigler which should insure his eligi-
'bility.
"Believe me, I want another year
at the game," Wieman continues. "I
have never felt that I have done my-
self justice.. When I landed in Ann
Arbor I 'didn't know the American
game at all. I just learned a few
things about the position of end and
a, little about the game in general
during my freshman year. I spent
the next year learning the tricks of
a tackle and was just about able to
hold my own when the season was
over and I came back next year only
to find that my services would be of
more value in the backfield. I never
felt, though, that I was a success
there, I was out of place. That is
the reason I am particularly anxious
to have another chance at !t. Aside
from football I will be mighty glad
to get back to the old stamping ground
again."
Beside raising the Michigan pros-
pects for next fall's football team by
the announcement of his own intend-
ed return, Tad declares that he ex-
pects to bring his younger brother
with him, a lad whom he describes as
"about my height, a little heavier than
I, but faster." According to Tad, "by
the time he gets through he ought to
be going with the best of them."
Michigan rooters who have seen
Wieman perform on the gridiron can
understand what his return wvill mean
to Yost's 1920 team. As a tackle he
is certain to be a bulwark on defense
and his fighting aggressiveness on the
offense will break up many end runs
and off-tacke mplays. Furthermore,
the - announcement that his brother
will accompany him brightens the out-
look for future Michigan teams.
HARDEST WINTER IN HISTORY
EXPERIENCED BY MASS. TOWN
Nantucket, Mass., March 19.-Short
of fuel and having waged a grim bat-
tle with sickness and death from in-
fluenza while isolated by 30 miles of
impassable ice, the people of Nan-
tucket are emerging from what they
call the hardest winter they ever ex-
perienced.

MANY SIGN FOR
G LASS TANK MEET
Sprint and Plunge Events Prove Most
Popular with Candi-
dates1
HENRY, HUFFMAN, MILLION
SHOW CLASS IN PLUNGE
Entries for the interclass swimming
meet, which will be held next Friday
and Saturday, are .coming in at a
good rate of speed., The events which
seem to be the most popular are the
sprints and the plunge for distance,
the breast stroke, back stroke, and
dives being slighted.
Good Men Sign Up
Among the men who have signed up
are several who should become com-
petent performers in the events which
they have chosen. E. T. Settle, '23,
who has entered for the 40 and 100
yard free style swims, appears to be
*a particularly good man. Jack Hen-
ry, '21, a recruit in the plunge, show-
ed real ability in his first attempts,
as did V. C. Huffman, '21. The sur-
prise of Friday afternoon's practice
was the performance of J. W. Mil-
lion, '21, whose plunge of 50.feet in
his fifth trial in that event proved
that he is capable of far better work.
In the plunge, however, Koch still re-
mains the best performer.
In the, Daily of Wednesday or
Thursday Coach Drulard will an-
nounce his selection of 15 men for the
Varsity. These swimmers, as previ-
ously announbced, will not be eligible
for competition in the interclass meet.
The awards which they will receive
will be decided upon at some future
meeting of the Board in Control of
Athletics. It is expected that they
will receive numerals, and either
swimming suits or jerseys.
Aggie Meet Off
M. A. C.' has written that they will
be unable to hold a dual meet with
Michigan before Spring vacation, ow-
ing to the annual interscholastic bas-
ketball tournament, which is to be
held on the day that was proposed for
the meet. Manager Elliott 'expects to
arrange a meet with them for the lat-
ter part of April, and in the meantime
to secure competition for the date
made vacant by the action of M.
A. C.
Entries for the interclass meet
should be made preferably at Phe in-
tramural office on the second floor of
the Press building, but may be giv-
en to Drulard or Elliott. For the ben-
efit of those who did not read Friday's
Daily the list of events is reprinted
here: 40, 100, 220, yard free style
dashes, 100 yard breast and back
strokes, plunge for distance, and fan-
cy diving. .
- Hope for 50 Entries
No more than 10 sets of numerals
will be awarded, but one set will be
given for every five men who sign
up. It is hoped that the entry list
will exceedl 50 and at least 35 are
practically sure of signing. A man
does not have to be an expert swim-
lier to enter the interclass. There
will be no stars in any event, as the
geod men 'will all have been picked
'for the Varsity. All who enter will
be admitted to the pool at any time
before the meet on the payment of
five cents.
HARBERT AND MOELLER PLAY
FINAL ROUND OF TOURNEY

J. C. Harbert, '23,. (25) won his way
into the final round of play in the
Un'ion handicap three cushion billiard
tournament Thursday night by defeat-
ing Er H.'Martin, '22, (22), 25 toy15.
Harbert's success in, this tourney
was no surprise to those who watch-:
ed his play in the straight rail tour-
nament which was run off at the
Union room some time ago. With a
small handicap, he distancedthe field
in that event displaying at all times
accuracy and considerable knowledge
of the finer points of the game. In the
present series he was placed at
scratch and, has won all his matches,
handily.
Harbert's opponent in the final
game at 4 o'clock this afternoon will
'be S. D. Moeller, '23, (24). Moeller
has proven his ability in this tourna-
ment and with his handicap of one
poin't should furnish strong opposition
to Harbert.
ADDITIONAL SPORTS-PAGE SIX

OHIO STATE FEARS LOSS OF
LAST SEASON'S FOOTBALL STARS
Since last season's eleventh hour
loss of the Big Ten football -cham-
pionship, Ohio State has been making
plans to , cop the supremacy in 1920.
Prospects at the Columbus institu-
tion have been given a severe blow,
however, by the news that Butch
Pixley, giant lineman, is planning to
transfer his allegiance to Princeton
next season. On a recent trip through
the East with his father, .he visited
Princeton and displayed a very evi-
dent interest in things about Nassau.4
During the last Christmas vacation,
the Princeton Musical club, during it's
stay in Columbus spent as much time
entertaini! g the big fellow as it did
audiences. These different events have
been viewed with suspicion by 0. S. U.-
adherents and they are anxiously
awaiting Pixleys decision.
Another loss that is keenly felt is
the withdrawal of Halfback Davis from
the university. A serious illness that
retarded his progress in school was
his reason for leaving, and pnless h
returns to summer school he will be
ineligible next fall.
Although the Scarlet and Gray
backfield last fall seemed to Mich-
igan ,rooters to be composed of Har-
ley in four positions, the loss of a
man of Davis' calibre, coupled with
Pixley's desertion, would be a serious
setback to any team.
COUNT CHAS FINALS
'20 ITS AND '22 ENGINEERS WILL
MEET IN SEMI
FINAL
Upperclass laws won 'their plae .in
the finals of the interclass race by
deflating Zinn' fresh lits, 27 to 17,
Wednesday 4ight. The game was last
and well played. Cohn and Loring
starred for the winners and ZInn scor-
ed 13 points for the defeated team..
Crawford's fresh lits have won two
hard games lately. On Wednesday
night they defeated the senior engi-
neers in one of the hardest fouvt
games w~iich has been ' played to
date, the final score -being 23 to 17.
On Thursday the same team won the
verdict from the junior lits in an over-
time game by a score of 26 to 18. The
points stood 18 all at the endof the
time but in the overtime period Pie-
tro found the basket for three baskets
and Rehmus scored another.
J-Lits Bump:Medcs
On Wednesday night the junior, lits
won from the underclass medics by
their good guarding. Novak and Gal-
lagher divided the winning team's 12
points between them, while Gleason
was largely responsible for the loser's
6 counters.
Thursday night the soph engiheers
beat the junior engineers in a close
game, by an 11 to 7 score. Messner
and Reynolds starred for the juniors
and Crawford and Hickey did stellar
work for the sophs.
Zinn's litr won from the underclass
dents by a 17 to 8 result. Zinn played
the best game for his team, while Sam-
uels starred for the dents. The .up-
perclass medics lost by default.
The tournament is being run off in
two rounds. As each team loses a
game it goes to the second round, the
winner of which will. play the loser of
the finals in the first round for second,
honors.
Three in First Round
There are but three teams left now

in the first round. These are the up-
perclass laws, the senior lits, and the
soph engineers. The las~t team will
play the senior lits for a place in the
finals. The winner of this match will,
in turn, engage the upperclass laws for
the campus title.
In the second round four teams are
still in the competition. These are
Crawford's, Zinn's, and Quarte.'s fresh
lits and the junior engineers. One
more team will drop down 'from the
;undefeated round. Of the teams still
in Crawford's lits have been show-
ing the best form. Although this team
got a late start and lost the first
game, -its powerful scoring will make
it a dangerous competitor for second
place.
The first three teams will be award-
ed jerseys with numerals, while the
fourth team will have the right to
wear them if the class will put up the
necessary funds.
SP IRIT

?"THERE'S NOTHING TO DO,
IN THIS OLE TOWN"
Have you ever said that, when
you're tired of the movies, and
your best girl is out of town,
and you feel sort of "unneces-
sary?"
Just note the address at the
bottom of this advertisement
and drop in here "just to look
around" and watch the players.
You'll soon find a partner for
a game of "rotation" or
"straight" and forget all about
your lonesomeness.
This is a clean, decent place,
one which you'll enjoy visiting
regularly. Come in today.
HUSTON BROS.
Billiards and Bowling, Cigars
and Candies. Cigarettes & Pipes.
"We try to treat you Right"

SPRING SUITINGS

Get measured
today and be ready
for spring wear.
"Cheaper. than
ready, made"

"Better Fit"

4

VARSITY,
TOGGERY SHOP
1107 S. UNIVERSITY
AVE.

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FLOWERS FLOWERING PLANTS
Cousins, & Ha u
Members Florists Telegrah Delivery
Drone 116 1002 S. UnIv.

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HAVE YOU EXECUTIVEABILITY and~a desire to see EUROPE
withot. expense? Write, stating why you should be chosen.
William W. Grace, 1020 Little Building, Boston 11; Mass.

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The saving in rug wear alone will pay for
the TORRINGTON. It removes the -
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It brightens up the delicate colorings of
your expensive rugs and carpets and adds
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WASHTENAW ELECTRIC S H 0 P
THE SHOP OF QUALITY
Phone 278 - 200 E. Washington it
w
AMW~

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For Spring
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The Home of Harl Schaffner & Marx Clothing
THE BIG STORE

6

Southwest Corner of Main and Washington Streets

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