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March 16, 1920 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-16

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UnIIA"1 X
DAY

.

1w wan

4:3attii

ASSOCIATE[
PRESS
D)AY ADD NIGHT If
SERVICE

I

_ .

No. 1:1



8.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 16, 1920.

PRICE. THREE

ENATE REAFFIHMS
IIFFERENCES WITH
WiL[SO0 N 0O N
W ARTICLE X RESERVATION
ADOPTED BY 2 TO 1
VOTE
DEMOCRATS J O IN
EPUBLICANS IN BALLOT
ion Ends Efforts for Compromise
to Insure Ratification of
Pact
(By Associated Press)
TashingtonsMarch 15.-Reaffirming
disagreement with President Wil-
on the issues of the peace treaty
troversy, the Senate adopted today
a, vote of more than two to one the
Article X reservation framed by
)ublican leaders.
:s action brought to an end, at least
the present, the protracted effort
a compromise that would insure
fication and the senate's decision
accepted generally as hastening
treaty toward another deadlock
n which it could be released only
the verdict at the polls next No-

i JMi" u w

s

UNIVERSITIES JUDGED BY CHARACTER
AND PERSONALIT I(, NOT BY BUILDINGS
-SAMUEL A. ELIOT

"A university is not judged by the
excellence of its buildings or the
amount of its endowment, but by the
kind of character that is nurtured in
its atmosphere and the kind of per-
sonality it develops," declared Mr.
Samuel Atkins Eliot in his address on
"Sight and Insight" at the University
union services held Sunday in Hill
auditorium.
"Education is not so much the ac-
cumulation of facts as it is, the in-
terpretation of these facts, -of mak-
ing them live," he said. Mr. Eliot told
of the great part the imagination play-
ed in everyday life and of how vital
it is in' business, patriotism, law and
'order, and history.
W4arning, Issued
He issued a warning against the
loss of iniigination through increased
knowledge, and said that the more
science discovers the more it reveals
new worlds for the imagination.

"All our knowledge ends in won-
der," he said, "and the glory of hu-
manity is the sense of expectation."
Impelling Motives of Life
"These are not the days of faith, so
we are told," he declared, "but still
the impelling motives of this life are
faith and hope and love." Mr. Eliot
closed his address by saying that the,
thing to be feared is the foss of the
spiritual life and what tht'orld needs
today is a re-birth of the old faith.
Two solos were sung by Robert R.
Dieterle of the School of Music during
the course of the service, accompan-
ied by Frank A, Taber. Harry M.
Carey, '20, presided.
A reception to Mr.tEliot was given
after the service at the home of Mr.
and Mrs. Stanley G. Stevens, 640 Ox-
ford road. Several members of the
faculty and their wives and members
of ' the Union church services com-
mittee were present.

INOUNCE UDUTS fO
OPERA T1ICKET SAE
"GEORGE DID IT" TO BE PRODUC-
ED FIVE DAYS, BEGINNING
APRIL 5

FILM TO SHOW NATAL
MILITIA IN ACTION.

?IoviextActress and
Football )Yan To
lie Hop Partners
Elaine Hammerstein, famous movie
actress, is planning to come all the
way from Los Angeles to attend the
Junior Hop.
Aside from her mere desire to at-
tend, Miss Hammerstein entertains the
.hope of bringing her manager and
procuring moving pictures of the
grand assembly for use in one of her
,future productions.
Incidentally, one of last year's foot-
ball men will be her Hop escort.
Ati1chigan Ties
for Second In
judge Contest
Michigan and Columbia pushed
Cornell for. first place and tied for
second hdnors in quantity of contri-
butions accepted and printed by
Judge in the College Wits number.
Pennsylvania came third, Dartmouth
fourth, and. Syracuse fifth, thus leav-
ing Michigan the only one of all the
middle west or western colleges
'among the leaders in the contest.
A cover design by Reed Bachman,
'20, was given honorable mention and
fprinted in the numiber. Four sketch-
es, two by Leland Atwood, '23A, one
by Donald Major, '20, and one by Wai-
do W. Gower, '23, were also given
relative prominence in this number.
;Besides the art contributions the Col-
lege Wits. number contains bits of
verse and prose by Kendrick Kimball,
'20, Donald Major, '20, Frances Stiles,
grad., and Mark K. Ehlbert, '20.
Reed Bachman, '20, editor of the
Gargoyle, seemed well pleased wit"
Michigan's showing, saying: "Michi-
gan did exceptionally well in the Col-
lege Wits contest. The next two edi-
tions of Judge will be filled -with mat-
ter they did not have space for in this
issuegand undoubtedly the Gargoye
art andh' literary staffs will again be
well represented."
SOUTHERN MEN 1 nO MEET FOR
ORGANIZATION OF DIXIE CLUB

SENIOR LITS, NOTICE?

GERMAN GOENETLCRISIS ENDS
WITH* FORMAL AGREEMENT BETWEEN
EBT- REGIME A ND KPPFACTID

Invitations and announce-
ments canbe ordered by senior
lits for the last time from 4
to 5:30 o'clock Wednesday in
University hall.
DAVID NASH,
Chairman.
SEN. JOHNSON TO SPEAK
IN ANN ARBOR TODAY
WILL NOT CAMPAIGN IN OWN IN
TERESTS; 'WILL CONDUCT
G. 0. P. MUEETING

NEW REICHSTAG MEMBERS TO BF
CHOSEN IN TWO
MONTHS
PRESIDENT WILL BE
ELECTED BY PEOPLE
Genera'l Von Luttwitz Erects Wire
Entanglements in Berlin
Streets
(By Associated' Press)
Paris, March 15:-The .government
crisis in Germany was ended today,
according to unofficial reports reach-
ing here, by * an agreement between
the Ebert and Kapp factions that the
former government was to remain in
power two months, during which elec-

Senator Hiram Johnson'

of

Cali -tions to the Relehstag would be

PRESENT

STUDENTS

WILL BEI

SEEN IN WAR MOVIES
TOMORROW

olned by Demcrats
n Democrats voted with the
publican membership for the
n, but this deflection from
ation ranks fell far short of
er that would be required to
It was conceded that oth-
ly would swing over on the
n roll call, but administra-
rs, backed by a definite as-
iat the new reservation was
ble to the president evi-
o apprehension that their
ild dwindle beyond the dan-

Vote 56 to 26
The vote for adoption of the reser-
tion was 56 to 26.
The reservation follows in general
rm the one adopted last Novem-
r. It reads:
'The United States assumes no ob-
ation to preserve the territorial in-
grity or political independence of
y other country by the employment
its military or naval forces, its re-
irces, or any form of economic dis-
mination, or to interfere in any
y in controversies between nations,
luding all controversies relating to
'ritorial integrity or political inde-
adence, whether members of the
,gue or not, under the provisions of
ticle X or to employ the military or
val forces of the United States, un-
r any article of the treaty or any
rpose unless in any particular case
congress which under the Consti-
ion has the sole power to declare
authorize the employment of the
litary or naval forces of the United
tes shall, in the exercise of full lib-.
y. of action, by act or joint reso-
ion so provide."
OFESSOR PARKER TO ADDRESS
FRESH ENGINEER ASSEMBLY
Prof. John H. Parker will speak on
general subjecf of electrical .en-
.eering at 11 o'clocl Wednesday
rning in University hall before the
shman engineers.
Professor Parker's speech is 'part
a program arranged by Prof. W.
Hoad for the freshman assemblies.
e program consists. principally of
ks by representatives of the differ-
engineering departments.

Application blanks for ti(kets for
"George Did It," which will run for
five days commencing Monday, April 5,-
at the Whitney theater, have been
mailed out to members of the cast,
chorus, committee, orchestra, life
members and participating life mem-
bers of the Union.
All of the Ann Arbor performances
with the exception of a matinee on
Friday, April 9, will be in the eve-
ning. . The prices for seats will be
$2.20 for the main floor and box seats,
$2.00 for the first four rows of the
balcony, $1.50 for the second four
rows of the balcony, and $1.00 for
the balance of the balcony.
Four-Seat Limit -
Not more than four seats will be
sold to any one person and each one
is asked to give his first, second, and
third choice of seats to facilitate the
filling of the orders. Members of the
committee should see William Leit-
zinger, '20, general chairman of the
opera at once for their application
blanks if they haye not yet received
any.
First Box Office Sale
The first box office sale is at 2
o'clock Tuesday, March 23, in the Un-
ion lobby. The order in which mail
orders will be filled follows:
1. Members of the cast, chorus,
committee and orchestra-Mail orders
must be in before Thursday, March 18.
2. Life members-Mail orders must
be in by Friday, March 19.
3. Participating life members-Mail
orders must be in by Saturday, March
20.

More than 50 men who are now in
school are seen in action in the offi-
cial motion pictures of the former
seventh and eighth divisions of the
Michigan naval militia in France to
be shown at 8 o'clock Wednesday
evening in Hill auditorium. The pic-
tures will be explained by Prof. T.
R. Hayden, formerly a commander of
the militia.
The proceeds from the film will be
used to publish a history of the work
of this organization, which, with the!
exception of the ambulance corps, was
the only military unit from'the Uni-;
versity. This unit on. Nov. 9, 1918, '
cut the Montmedy-Sedan railroad,
over which the Germans were receiv-
ing all their food supplies, and influ-
enced the signing of the armistice two,
days later.
Taken by Signal Corps
The pictures were taken oy the sig-
nal corps and were only recently re-;
leased. They depict in action the
naval railway batteries which consti-
tuted the largest mobile artillery ever
used. More than half of the officers;
and men in these divisions were Mich-
'igan men.

fornia, Republican candidate for nom-
ination to the presidency will be in
Ann Arbor for a short time today,,
meeting the students and citizens in
the lobby of the Union from 5 to 6
o'clock, and speaking at a banquet
at the Union immediately after the
reception..
He comes under the auspices of the
Johnson-for-President club and the
Washtenaw Republican club. As the
representative of the Republican Na-
tional committee, Mr.' Johnson will
not campaign directly for nimself, but
will conduct a Republican meeting.
Ten-Day Tour R
Swinging through the state on a
10-day campaigning tour, Mr. Johnson
comes here directly from Ypsilanti,
where he will address an audience
early this afternoon. This morning
he will be in Jackson.
Enemy of League
As the avowed enemy of the League
of Nations, his visit here is consider-
ed of much interest to the 'Univer-
sity, which has had the opportunity
of hearing the league defended by
Gen. Leonard Wood. He has been
quoted through the press as saying
that he will support whatever candi-
date is nominated at the Republican
convention in Chicago.
With Michigan as a pivotal state
for the 20 different states which held
presidential primaries, Johnson's cam-
paign tour is being closely watched
by Washington politicians.
Late BVulletins

and a new president of the German
republic elected by a popular vote.
The reported agreement was declar-
ed to have been reached on the fol-
flowing basis:
First, Kapp abandons his intentions
of forming a cabinet.
Second, a new cabinet is to be
formed, composed of experts.
Third, new elections to the reich-
stag are to be held within two months.
Ebert to Keep Power
. Fourth, a new president of the Ger-
.man republic will be elected, not by
the reichstag, but by the people.
Fifth, pending the election Friderich
Ebert is to remain in power.
Sixth, the economic council of the
empire and the employment councils
are to be transferred into a second
chamber, to be called the chamber of
'labor.
GRENADES THROWN
Berlin, March 15.-Eight- hand gran-
ades are reported to have been thrown
this afternoon' from 'the roof of a
building into the street in front of the
headquarters of General Baron Lutt-
witz, minister of defense in the new
government. There were no casual-
ties as far as known. No arrests
were made. t .
Rail traffic in Berlin was at a stand-
still, from early morning. The water
supply was restored but the gas and
electric supplies were still cut off.
Entanglements Erected
General Von Luttwitz .has erected
large wire entanglements at all the
street corners to protect government
buildings from possible surprise at-
tacks. No newspapers appeared to-
Iday except some special sheets of the
local ,Anzeitung, which in accordance
with the government's decree contains
only news pleasing to the govern-
ment.
The public is extremely skeptical of
the reports published in this form.
The local Anzeitung asserts the mil-
itary units everywhere lare declaring
for the new government and adds
that resistance is being offered only
in a few places.

Mobilization of Unit
The unit mobilized the day war was
declared and its members averaged
more than a year in France. They
were associated with the a-mbulance
corps at Soissons and the members
of this corps now in school have been
invited to the entertainment as t he
guests of the naval militia.
Professor Hayden was a former
commander of one of the, guns in
France. In addition to the motion
pictures, there will be slides of some
of the leading men and events con-
nected with the unit.
NOTED CHEMIST WILL
SPEAK HERE TONIGHT

All students from the southern-
states are invited to attend the ini-
tial meeting of the Dixie club to-
night in room 318-20 of the Union.
This meeting will be in the form of a
get-together affair and those men who
play musical instruments are asked to
bring them along.
The meeting has been arranged un-
der the auspices of the Kentucky club
and a program is being worked up
by the officers of that organization.
Definite action will probably be taken
in regard to arrangements for a Dixie
club spring party, the music for which
will be furnished by one of the fam-
ous southern jazz bands.
IL CIRCULO D'ANNUNZIO
TO HAVE VARIED PROGRAM

4. Yearly members-Box office sale,'
Michigan Union lobby commencing
Tuesday, March 23, at 2 o'clock, in
the order shown, on the slips given
out to yearly members starting Thurs-
day, March 18 at 9 o'clock in the
morning.
5. Women ,of the University--Box
office sale, Hill auditorium, Saturday,
March 27, from 2 to 5: o'clock. Slips
will be given out at the office of the
deani of women starting Thursday,
March 24.
6. General public-Box office Whit-
ney theater, commencing Wednesday,
March 31 at 10 o'clock in the morn-
ing.
FACULTY MEN TO ATTEND
CONVENTION IN CHICAGO

TT EXPLAINS USES OF
ENGLISH TO FRESH

LITSI

of. Fred N. Scott addressed the
iman assembly Monday afternoon.
talk covered the use and meaning
he English language ,in different
s of the United States and the use
alects. He then contrasted the lan-
e as spoken in England and in the
ed States.
dIen to Address Students in Union
vernor Frank O. Lowden, Repub-
z nominee for the presidential
idacy will arrive in Ann Arbor
):30 o'clock Friday morning and
be here until the middle of the
'noon. Arrangements are being
e by the Lowden-for-President
to have him meet the students
speak to them in the Un'ion. Com-
arrangements will be announced

Two members of the education de-
partment, Profs. J. B. Edmondson and
C. O. Davis, will give reports of their
committees at the twenty-fifth annual
meeting of\ the North-Central Asso-
ciation of Colleges and Secondary
Schools, which will be held the last
three days of this week at the Sher-
man hotel in Chicago.
Professor Edmondson will tell of
the work done by the special com
'mittee working on a tentative set of
standards for accrediting junior high
schools. The report of the commission!
on secondary schools will he read by(
Professor Davis.
Registrar Arthur G. Hall and Prof.
Fred N. Scott will also attend the
convention.

Prof. Walter A. Patrick, of Johns
Hopkins university, member of a com-
mittee of six appointed by the Na-
tional Research council to encburage
research in colloid chemistry, will lec-
ture at 8 o'clock this evening in the
amphitheater of the Chemistry build-
ing. ,His subject will be "The Ab
sorption of Gas by Silica Gel and'
Its Industrial. Applications."
This subject is considered of inter-
est to everyone concerned with med-
icine, chemistry, physics, botany, or
any of the allied sciences. The lec-
ture, to be held under the a pices of
the University, will' be open to the
public.
It was only through the combined
efforts of the science departments of
the University, and through the se-
curing of the signatures of several
members of the faculties of these de,
partments, that Professor Patrick's
services could be obtained here. Be-
cause of his work on colloids and his
connection with the National Research
council, he is considered one of the
few men in this country so well able
to give this sbject.

Rollin R. Winslow, '19L, who was
with the American forces attached to
the Italian army, will give a short
talk ii Italian, on '"La Battaglia sul
Piave," before Il Circulo d'Annunzio
at 7 o'clock Wednesday evening, in'
room 202, South Wing.
A musical program has also been
arranged. Prof. P. S. Zampiere will
sing the "Garibaldi Hymn," and the
brothers Falcone will liven up the en-
tertainment with some "Jazz Italiane."
All interested' in "things Italian"
are cordially invited to be present.
J-LITS TO HOLD FIRST
CLASS DANCE SATURDAY
The junior lits will hold their first
class dance of the year from 2:30 to1
5:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon,
March 20. "Sandy" Wilson's seven-
piece orchestra will furnish the mus-
1C.
Tickets at 50 cents each may be
obtained from Ceilan Rorick, chair-
man of the social committee or from!
Katrina Schermerhorn, Alice Beck-
liam, Eleanor Spenser, Richard Khuen,
Jack Gardner, Gratton Rourke, Fran-'
cis Maire, or Dorothy Dunlap.
Saint Clair Club to Meet Tonight
Organization and future plans of
the St. Clair County club will be!
brought up at the meeting of the club
at 7:15 o'clock tonight on the third
floor of the Union. All women from
the county are urged to attend.

Major Jackson Morris of Kentucky tne communists nave proclaimed a
opened the Republican club last night counter revolution and general strike.
in the Union with a short speech in A number of labor councils have
which he emphasized the need of been formed at Essen and Dortmung.
Jevery young man to have a part in Fighting continues at Frankfort.
politics. He suggested that every stu- ' Bavaria, Wtrttemburg and-Baden
dent ally himself with his. home or- have joined together as one state, and
ganization and offer to go out and I Saxony, it is reported, will enter the
make speeches. block.
The club elected the following offi-
cers: F. H. Laude, '22L, president; W. PROF. hI. R. CROSS INVITED
W. Hinshaw, '20, Karl Velde, '20, D. TO ATTEND ART CONGREAS
. Fagerburg, '20L, Chesser Camp-
bell, '21, W. F. Gries, '20, and G. G.. Prof. Herbert R. Cross' of the fine
McNight, '21D, vice-presidents; James arts department, has received an in-
K. Pollock, '22L, secretary; and S ,L. vitation to attend the History of Art
.Sonne, '20, treasurer. . congress to be held in Paris in 1921
or 1922. The invitation is from Lieut-
h. 0. T. C. Club to Ratify Constitution Col. Thodore Reinach, who spoke here
Ratification of the R. 0. T. C. club, last year in the interests of the
constitution is the main business to French educational commission. He
be transacted at a meeting of that has requested Professor. Cross to
club att7:30 o'clock this evening in head the delegation from the state of
room 306 of the Union. Michigan.

Up to the time of going to press last
night The Daily had rAceived no word
of the Michigan-Indiana basketball
game results..
(By Assoeiated Press)
London, March 15. - David Lloyd
George, the British prime minister,
announced that the following man-
dates have been allocated:
German East Africa to Great
Britail and Belgiun.
German South West Africa to the.
Union of South Africa.
eGrman possesions in the Pacific
ocean south of the equator other than
Samoa, to the commonwealth of Aus-
tralia..
Samoa to New Zenland and the
German islands north of the equator
to Japan.
MAJOR JACKSON MORRIS OPENS
CAMPUS REPUBLICAN CLUI

STRIKES CALLED
London, March.15.-Telephonic mes-
sages received by the Berlin corre-
spondent of the Exchange Telegrhph
company from different parts of Ger-
many report the situation as follows:
Silesia, an independent government,
has been formed under the direction
of the Socialists. In the Rhine val-
ley and Westphalia indtfstrial regions

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