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March 14, 1920 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1920-03-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WINS SIX STRAIGHT VICTORIES

LIKElY TO BE REC.
VARSITY SPORT
' YEAR

at more than 125 men participat-
i the interclass and interfratern-
ockey games this year is the
ment of Fred Fletcher, '21, man-
of the informal team. This large
out, coupled with the successful
n which the informal team en-
L, gives the intramural depart-
cause for considerable- satisfac-
meeting of all those interested
terclass hockey was the first step
rd the formation of hockey teams.
wing this, a schedule 'of classj
s- was arranged. All of these
ists were hard fought and some
material was' uncovered. The sen-
engineering team came out vic-
us in this series. The interfra-
ty league was formed with the
ing of the new semester and, as
e interclass, race, some excellent'
s were run off.
Le Mieux Co4ches
Le Mieux of the engineering
ty, agreed to coach an informal
if one were organized and, in
way, Pe first Michigan hockey
came into existence. Coach Lel
x spent a great deal of time with

the team and whten, finally, a, game
was scheduled with Assumption col-
lege, the sextette was in fine condi-
tion.
That game proved to Michigan how
good the team really was.,I No one
knew that the school had an aggrega-
tion which could win a hard game.
Then games with the strongest in-
dustrial teams from Detroit were
scheduled, but all came here only
to go back defeated. When Michigan
triumphed over the Weber aggrega-
tion in overtime periods, it defeated
one of the strongest contenders for
the American championship.
Six straight victories is the record
which the .squad acheived. No more
games could be scheduled on account
of the approach of warm weather,
which softened the ice and made fast
play inmpossible.
Defensive Work Best
Of the personnel of the squad little
need' be said. The men developed into-
a sextette of fast, aggressive, and
heady players. Together with this a
brand of team work was presented
.which made scoring against Michigan
a difficult task. The team undoubted-
ly showed up best on defense, par-
ticularly in the first few games.
Richards, Kahn, and Follis made up a
combination which, by keeping the

opponent's score down, made it possi-
ble for Michigan's few points to mean
victory. Richards, especially,. deserv-
es unstinted praise for his stellar
work.
However, in the latter games the
offensive play- had developed to the
point where it was equal to the de-
fensive work and a well-balanced
team resulted. Barkell, the fast cen-
i er, was the scoring star all season.
Trip North Planned
In view of the splendid record
which the team made the Athletic as-
sociation granted permission for a
trip north and games with the Hough-
ton College of Mines and possibly
Wisconsin, which has had an inform-
al team for several years. The nec-
etssary arrangements could not be
made, however, and the plan fell
through. It is hoped that next year
will see games scheduled with these
schools.
Provided that the necessary inter-
collegiate schedule can be arranged1
for next season hockey will be recog-t
nized as a Varsity sport. Efforts are
now being made to secure matches
with all the schools around here
which hace ice teams and since the
majority of the northern schools in
the United States and the nearby parts
of, Canada have such squads, it is ex-
pected, that the dates widl be arranged.
CLASS SWIMMING
STARTS MONDAY
Practice for the interclass swim-
ming meet will begin Monday after-
noon at the Y. M. C. A. Men desiring
to enter should report to the Y. M. C.
A. at 3:30 o'clock and ask to sign on
the interclass book. Admission will
be 10 cents. Upon entering the pool,
the men shotiAl report to acting Cap-
tain Babcock, or acting Managers
Booth and Elliott.
Tryouts for the plunge will be held.
at the same time. Prospective plung-
ers report to one of the men mention.-
ed above. Before 'entering the pool
pay 10 cents and sign on the Varsity
book.
The following men are requested to
be on hand with suits for group pic-
tures: Babcock, Hyde, Stuart, Rob-

SEVEN WRESTLING .
MATCHES DECIDED
Because of complications in ar-
rangements it was impossible to run
off all t1e semi-final wrestling match-
es as scheduled yesterday. In order
to start the finals next Saturday as
previously arranged it will be necess-
ary to hold a second set of semi-finals
next Wednesday. The title in the
heavyweight class can be settled at
any time the Planck brothers ar-
range to clash, as all others have been
eliminated in that class. At least one
more contest is necessary in each of
the other -classes before next Satur-
day.
Following is given the result of'
each contest, stating the time and
holds by which the fall was secured
Lightweight-Fleckenstein vs. Gil
lard, won by Fleckenstein in five min-
utes, 35 seconds ,with a half nelson.
Welterweight- Landis vs. Packard,
decision given to Packard. Dyni vs.
Kerr-Kerr downed by Dyni in 10 min-
utes with body scissors. Boscham vs.
Dicken, 'victory for Dicken in three
minutes, 42 seconds, by means of
double bar arm' hold."]
Middleweight-Haller vs. Kalmback,
Kalmback defeated in six minutes,
seven seconds by arm and leg hold.
Heavyweighbt-G. Planck vs. Mudd,
won by Planck in two minutes, eight
seconds with body scissors. J. Planck
vs. Goebel, Goebel downed by chan-
cery and arm lock after nine minutes
48 seconds of strenuous wrestling.
FAST GAMES IN UNION TOURNEY;
EIGHT PLAYERS ELIMINATED1
W. H. Ingham, '21,: (22) defeated
E. L. White, '22E, (21) 22 to 7 Fri,?ay
night at the Union billiard room in
the fastest game that has,.been play-
ed to date in the Union handicap,
three-cushion billiard tournament.
Ingham averaged one point an inning
for the entire game. On Saturday af-
ternoon A. D. Moore, Grad., (25) nos-
ed H. G. Griffith, '21, (20) out of a
hard fought game by a 25 to 20 count.
Monday at 4:30 o'clock P. E. Gar-
rick, '20, (25) will meet E. H. Martin,

'. W. Page, '22E, (21) and S. D.
Moeller, '23, (24) will be the contest-
ants Tuesday at 3 o'clock and in the
evening W. H. Ingham, '21, (22) and.
A. D. Moore, Grad., (25) will wind up
the second round of the series. All of
these men won their games in the first
round very handily and this week's
play should bring forth some keen
competition.

1_ .1

I. S. Exchange Expensive for Britain
London, Mar. 13.-The Daily Mail
calculates that the adverse exchange
on America is costing the United
Kingdom 225,000,000 pounds a year,
which is more than the administrative
cost of the whole country in pre-war
times.
Patronize our Advertisers.-Adv.

999

TAXI

999

K
a

A DODGE CAR AND
DODGE SERVICE ---
ENOUGH SAID' .-

999

TAXI

999

THE MYSTERY IS SOLVED

VICTOR RECORD No. 18647

WILL EXPLAIN

Our long delayed shipment of Victor
Records for March is now here., All the
tatest Dance Records and the other

kinds are here.

Schauberle £&

Son, friusic

J

ertson, White, Valentine, Gilmore, '22, (22) in the first game of the see-
Dunlop, Lewy, Levy, Goldsmith, Stein, ond round of play. Monday evening
M1yers, 'Settle, Elliott, Koch, Bush, at 8 o'clock W. B. Gilbert, '22E, (20)
Loeb, Smith, Hanson, Parker, Porter, and J. C. Harbert, '23, (25) will settle
Joyce, Grayson, and Randall. their differences.

Ho us
110v S. Plain Street

INFORMAL HOCKEY TEAM

f

,.

, . f _ ,

I

;

11

RBO'S

11

11

TEST

tU..

SIX CONCERTS-wmMAY 19, 20, 21, 22, 1920m FOUR DAYS
The Most Imposing Array of Musical Celebrities Ever Assembled for a May Festival-Including
Many "Head Liners" from Both the Metropolitan and the Chicago Opera Companies--and
Other Renowned Artists, Both Instrumental and Vocal.

.Requliem
Berlioz'
Damnation
Of Faust

TITTA

RUFFO
Chicago Opera
THE WORLD'S
GREATEST
AND HIGHEST
PRICED BARITONE

"EDDIE",
JOHNSON
Chicago Opera
"THE TENOR
SENSATION
OF THE YEAR"
(Eduardo Giovanni)

MYRNA
SHARLOW
Chicago Opera

CAROLINA

RENATO

LEON

MARGARET

LAZZARI
Metropolitan Opera
A brilliant operatic star

A prima donna who excells
not only vocally but who 3's
personally most attractive.

I

who
the

is equally successful on
concert platform.

ZANELLI
Metropolitan Opera
"Chile's greatest baritone"
who has won fame in New
York. His first Festival ap-
pearance.
FREDERICK
STOCK

ROT HIER a
Metropolitan Opera

French basso who has won
many triumphs and created
many furores.
ALBERT
STANLEY

MATZENAUER
Metropolitan Opera
Recognized throughout the
musical world as one of the
greatest concert and operatic
contraltos.

LENORA
SPARKES
Metropolitan Opera,

JOSEF
LIHEVIENNE
Pianist

EDWIN ARTHUR
KRAFT

A prima donna who has tri-
umphed at all the big Eng-.
lish festivals and in opera in

"Tue real Rubinstein No. II,
is L h e v i nn e (Henry T.
Finck). His performances'
are wonderful."

Mr. Kraft Js one of America's
most distinguished young or-
ganists, and has won many

WILLIAM
WHEELER'
~JAMES
HAMILTON
ROBERT
DIETERLIE

, and the

RUSSELL

and the
UNIVERSITY

CHICAGO

CARTER
and a
CHORUS

SYMPHONY
ORCHESTRA

CHORAL
ONION

OF SCHOOL
CHILDREN

this country

and abroad.

triumphs In this field.

TICKETS: $4.50, $5., $6., $7.

If Pre-Festival "Cover Coupon" is Returned) Deduct $3.00

Public Sale of Tickets Hill Auditorium, Instead of School of Music, Saturday, March 20 8:00 A M
MAIL ORDERS filled in advance, in order of receipt. Address orders to CHARLES A. SINK, Secratary

w

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